Christopher Best
United States
Brandon
FL
flag msg tools
Avatar
Played this for the first time last night with my group and it was largely a bust. I didn't want to run them through the first training scenario so we decided to play the next one as far as difficulty goes, Rising Tide. After three hours, everyone was ready to stop out of boredom. Up to that point, all we had done was explore a bunch of bookshelves and gained clues. No exciting events, no combat. Largely nothing progressed from an evidence standpoint.

I guess my question is, does it pick up? Is there a better starting scenario people prefer?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Ainsworth
United Kingdom
Manchester
Lancashire
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Yeah, the first one.
19 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mathue Faulk
United States
Cedar Park
TX
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I wouldn't call the first scenario a "training scenario." It's just a shorter scenario that's designed to be a good entry into the game. It was a mistake to start elsewhere IMO.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Geoff Core
msg tools
The first one isn't a training story, but it's a good, relatively short introduction to the game. My group was totally sold on the game after the first round.

There's a reason they had it first and the one you played as the forth and last story.

I'd suggest giving the game another go with the first story. It is quite good!
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Play the first one first. Its in a mansion, its a mystery, its very much like the original version scenarios. Its fun.

Then do the second one.

Continue like this.

Don't jump into the final scenario, the longest one, which is designed for those who have really got into the game and are prepared to spend a very very long time working through a story.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Robert Trayers
United States
Pittsburgh
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb
McCrank wrote:
After three hours, everyone was ready to stop out of boredom. Up to that point, all we had done was explore a bunch of bookshelves and gained clues. No exciting events, no combat. Largely nothing progressed from an evidence standpoint.


I found this useful. All the people saying start with the first scenario, that's well and good, but if a game group prefers a bit of combat to offset hours of adding tiles and flipping clue tokens, now we know this scenario might be one to avoid. Especially if, after three hours, nothing progressed as far as evidence goes. It sounds like flipping a "nothing happens" card again and again.

It's also an argument against the app I haven't come across. After all, a Keeper would (or should) be able to spot he's losing his players and come up with a reason to add some combat to spice things up and increase tension.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
phil mccrackin
msg tools
Honestly you should probably skip the second one. It's the real hardass of the group, and it often bugs out just as you think you're about to win. The truth is, and most don't realize this yet because of where the app bugs out, they aren't near winning - that's when the scenario unfairly sticks the knife in.

That's why i'm suggesting to skip it until you've played all others. I found the third one much slower as you said, merciful at it's start, in comparison.

Edit: I'll add, I even four easier than two. Oh, and if you want an easier time of it, the way the app works now - always take five investigators.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
phil mccrackin
msg tools
RobertPT wrote:
McCrank wrote:
After three hours, everyone was ready to stop out of boredom. Up to that point, all we had done was explore a bunch of bookshelves and gained clues. No exciting events, no combat. Largely nothing progressed from an evidence standpoint.


I found this useful. All the people saying start with the first scenario, that's well and good, but if a game group prefers a bit of combat to offset hours of adding tiles and flipping clue tokens, now we know this scenario might be one to avoid. Especially if, after three hours, nothing progressed as far as evidence goes. It sounds like flipping a "nothing happens" card again and again.

It's also an argument against the app I haven't come across. After all, a Keeper would (or should) be able to spot he's losing his players and come up with a reason to add some combat to spice things up and increase tension.


It also depends on how fast you play. I find the app way too slow the way it's implemented now. I don't need to confirm every single token in turn to get it right. And since there's no labeling every player needs to look at each token again to decide if they want to reveal anything, that means a lot of passing and tapping the app. The app is a big problem with this game the way it works now.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mike Fazakerley
United Kingdom
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Why are you passing the device around? Have one player, the best reader, control the app, it saves a lot of messing around. The ideal solution is to connect your device to a large screen TV so everyone can see it clearly.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bryce K. Nielsen
United States
Elk Ridge
Utah
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
CletusVanDamme wrote:
Yeah, the first one.

Seriously. It's not a "training" scenario, it's a normal good scenario that's just a little shorter and not so difficult as the other ones. It's well written, engaging, and fun.

-shnar
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
soak man
msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
McCrank wrote:
Played this for the first time last night with my group and it was largely a bust. I didn't want to run them through the first training scenario so we decided to play the next one as far as difficulty goes, Rising Tide. After three hours, everyone was ready to stop out of boredom. Up to that point, all we had done was explore a bunch of bookshelves and gained clues. No exciting events, no combat. Largely nothing progressed from an evidence standpoint.

I guess my question is, does it pick up? Is there a better starting scenario people prefer?


Rising Tides is the long one correct? If so, that one plays differently than the others. It is very much a who-dunnit mystery until the very end. A lot of investigating, no fighting. It's a nice change, but if you prefer combat then the other 3 are all more combat focused. First scenario and 3rd are your best bets.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jason Pisani
United States
New Albany
Indiana
flag msg tools
Avatar
I found this scenario to be pretty boring. It took us 6 hours to complete. The story is very very thin.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Justin Colm
msg tools
mbmb
Just as a point of trivia, there is at least one fairly obscure way to get combat in the 'investigative' part of this scenario, but it's something of an outlyer and needs the players to do something pretty stupid... as actually, do a lot of the more surprising events in this game, disappointingly.

For instance, we played the scenario twice with the group and beat it both times: the first we aced; we got 'conclusive' evidence against both culprits and discovered the ritual location (3 out of 3 Objective-wise). The second time we didn't get evidence against anyone (we made deliberate decisions to do some things differently for the sake of experimentation) or discover where the ritual was (0 out of 3 objective-wise) but still were able to 'guess' a correct suspect to follow. This was through a process of elimination: "we didn't find that object there this time so we can rule that person out". This is a flaw in the scenario I mentioned elsewhere. It's essentially mechanical. The suspects will behave the same and mostly say the same things regardless of whether they are a cultist or not. So we also won on the second play-through even though the investigation went badly... pretty unsatisfactory. It is my least favourite scenario. It's far too long to be so easy.

But when I did a virtual playthrough on the App to experiment with the scenario and see everything (it's too long and fiddly for solo play) I found there was a much more dramatic and interesting ending if we had done some things wrong. I'll elaborate in the spoiler:
Spoiler (click to reveal)

For the sake of experimentation I attacked the Deep One Hybrids in detective Blake's basement
Spoiler (click to reveal)
(requires the silver key to enter)
. After that I opened the door from the basement into Blake's room, thus blowing our cover and giving the investigation away to Blake, who, in this game, was a cultist (we knew this as the evidence is in his basement). This changed up the scenario ending considerably. The ritual location was the docks. As well the usual cultists to fight the other suspects were transforming into Deep One hybrids, which was pretty cool. Then, the transforming inhabitants of Innsmouth became a rampaging mob (Riot monster). Then a Star Spawn spawned (I'm unsure how much of this was happening because I was just killing the monsters outright in the App whilst ignoring the ritual. Whether the pace of transformation would have gone slower if I was killing monsters slower I'd have to experiment with). After this point, and with the ritual still uninterrupted (I was deliberately ignoring it to see what would happen) Zadok turned up on his boat and called for us to get onboard to flee. This we did... to get what I'm sure is a fairly obscure alternative ending.

Now, presumably this ending could only happen if Zadok is not a cultist, the ritual happens at the docks and the investigators do badly at stopping the ritual.


These kinds of moments exist in the scenarios. I'm sure there will be others I haven't seen. But my point is this ending was a lot more exciting and dramatic than the effective one. Why couldn't they make the common ending as exciting?

So this scenario joins Scenario 1 in having a much more interesting, exciting ending for people who did badly then for people who investigated effectively.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Greg Filpus
United States
Bellevue
Washington
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
High Flying Bird wrote:
But when I did a virtual playthrough on the App to experiment with the scenario and see everything (it's too long and fiddly for solo play) I found there was a much more dramatic and interesting ending if we had done some things wrong. I'll elaborate in the spoiler:
Spoiler (click to reveal)

For the sake of experimentation I attacked the Deep One Hybrids in detective Blake's basement
Spoiler (click to reveal)
(requires the silver key to enter)
. After that I opened the door from the basement into Blake's room, thus blowing our cover and giving the investigation away to Blake, who, in this game, was a cultist (we knew this as the evidence is in his basement). This changed up the scenario ending considerably. The ritual location was the docks. As well the usual cultists to fight the other suspects were transforming into Deep One hybrids, which was pretty cool. Then, the transforming inhabitants of Innsmouth became a rampaging mob (Riot monster). Then a Star Spawn spawned (I'm unsure how much of this was happening because I was just killing the monsters outright in the App whilst ignoring the ritual. Whether the pace of transformation would have gone slower if I was killing monsters slower I'd have to experiment with). After this point, and with the ritual still uninterrupted (I was deliberately ignoring it to see what would happen) Zadok turned up on his boat and called for us to get onboard to flee. This we did... to get what I'm sure is a fairly obscure alternative ending.

Now, presumably this ending could only happen if Zadok is not a cultist, the ritual happens at the docks and the investigators do badly at stopping the ritual.


These kinds of moments exist in the scenarios. I'm sure there will be others I haven't seen. But my point is this ending was a lot more exciting and dramatic than the effective one. Why couldn't they make the common ending as exciting?

So this scenario joins Scenario 1 in having a much more interesting, exciting ending for people who did badly then for people who investigated effectively.


I had a similar experience in my real playthrough of the scenario where I guessed wrong.

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Picked the wrong suspect, he led us to downtown which was the wrong location. So there was no ritual to disrupt, just all the monsters you mentioned. All we could do was survive until Zadok showed up with an escape route. I didn't make it there in time to see what would've happened if I'd gotten there, but I assume it'd be similar to what you saw.

I'm guessing the residential district also has an escape like that, and maybe an alternative character to bail you out if Zadok is a cultist.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Justin Colm
msg tools
mbmb
GregF wrote:


I had a similar experience in my real playthrough of the scenario where I guessed wrong.

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Picked the wrong suspect, he led us to downtown which was the wrong location. So there was no ritual to disrupt, just all the monsters you mentioned. All we could do was survive until Zadok showed up with an escape route. I didn't make it there in time to see what would've happened if I'd gotten there, but I assume it'd be similar to what you saw.

I'm guessing the residential district also has an escape like that, and maybe an alternative character to bail you out if Zadok is a cultist.


That's interesting. So it seems that there's two basic types for the end game: guessing right (in which case you stop the ritual to win) and guessing wrong (in which case you can only escape) and then a third variation for guessing right but having given yourself away to one of the cultists along the way (as in the example I gave above), which basically conflates the two; the ritual is there to be stopped and you can win but all of the other crazy stuff is happening too.

I'm interested in how Zadok rescued you (or would have rescued you had you made it) in the downtown area as his boat isn't there? Does he just appear at the edge of the board beckoning you? At the docks he was actually on his boat, which made sense as an escape route. Also, from memory (and I wish I'd taken a screenshot now) the ending text was pretty specific about escaping 'down the coast'.

I'm sure you're right in your guess that there will be an escape route in each location.

Well, fuel for experimentation when I can be bothered.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Greg Filpus
United States
Bellevue
Washington
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
High Flying Bird wrote:
I'm interested in how Zadok rescued you (or would have rescued you had you made it) in the downtown area as his boat isn't there? Does he just appear at the edge of the board beckoning you? At the docks he was actually on his boat, which made sense as an escape route. Also, from memory (and I wish I'd taken a screenshot now) the ending text was pretty specific about escaping 'down the coast'.


Essentially, yes.

Spoiler (click to reveal)
I don't remember the exact text, but the gist of it was him popping out of a door in the Warehouse that led off the map, with an Interact token to escape.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
R.P. Kraul
United States
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
mb
I found Rising Tide exciting at first, as it's more investigative in nature. But as I concluded the second day, I found myself becoming somewhat bored with it. I definitely prefer the more combat-focused scenarios, as there's constant danger. Rising Tide seemed to lack danger. Interesting that some folks have written that playing the scenario poorly increases the tension.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Justin Smith

New Hampshire
msg tools
Quote:
This was through a process of elimination: "we didn't find that object there this time so we can rule that person out".


Quote:
The suspects will behave the same and mostly say the same things regardless of whether they are a cultist or not.


But if the people said different things, wouldn't it exacerbate the first issue?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bryce K. Nielsen
United States
Elk Ridge
Utah
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
This gives me a lot of love for this quest. The two times we played it, the cultists were none of the ones mentioned above, and the ritual was both times in the same place not mentioned above. I had high hopes that each suspect could potentially be a cultist, but the second play through it was the same two, so I was scared that my hopes would be dashed. That does not appear to be the case. Can't wait to try this one again.

-shnar
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Justin Colm
msg tools
mbmb
Draffut wrote:
Quote:
This was through a process of elimination: "we didn't find that object there this time so we can rule that person out".


Quote:
The suspects will behave the same and mostly say the same things regardless of whether they are a cultist or not.


But if the people said different things, wouldn't it exacerbate the first issue?


It would help to obfuscate the essentially mechanical nature of the scenario. But essentially yes, the dialogues have to be vague and generally unhelpful / unreliable... I don't want to say it is a 'complaint' exactly but once you cotton to this fact the scenario becomes very uninteresting and not desirable to replay.

Other than the fact the dialogues sometimes bequeath clue tokens (which can also be gotten many other ways) it is essentially pointless speaking to the characters... a waste of actions. Nothing they say reflects their actual guilt or otherwise, although they do have their own individual stories that are somewhat worth revealing for their own sakes... the first time you play.

Proving guilt is simply a matter of finding the right card in the right place... so essentially all you have to do is check as many of those points of interaction as possible (and it's not possible to check all of them in a given game because of the way they have seeded essential items, but needing only one of 3 pieces of evidence (either suspect or the location) means you don't need to). That is literally all you need to do to make it to the end game. Interact with the maybe 3 or 4 elements in a given location that possibly have one of the 'Evidence' cards, establishing guilt. Even if you find none of them, you can still make a near-certain 'guess' at the culprits, as I demonstrated in my second game described above, simply by noting which pieces of evidence weren't there.

In a nutshell: once you've found an 'Evidence' card for Joyce (as a random example) in one game, all you need to do is check the same place in any subsequent game. If the card is there she's a cultist. If it isn't then you can rule her out. It's that straightforward. You don't need to speak to her at all. Find one single piece of evidence from 3, or rule out 2 locations or 3 suspects and you get to the end game. Nearly impossible not to do after just a couple of games.

This transparent mechanic really makes this the least replayable scenario when it seemed to have the potential to be the most replayable. It's also the easiest in my opinion; I don't know how they've come up with the 3 star rating. We have not failed it and knowing what I know I can't imagine ever failing it, other than with awful dice rolling in the final part. I don't know, perhaps I discern the mechanics and design of these scenarios quicker or more easily than a lot of players because a lot of people say they find the scenarios very replayable. That's probably down to my wide experience with interactive narrative and my general ability for discerning and understanding systems.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
R.P. Kraul
United States
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
mb
High Flying Bird wrote:


This transparent mechanic really makes this the least replayable scenario when it seemed to have the potential to be the most replayable. It's also the easiest in my opinion; I don't know how they've come up with the 3 star rating. We have not failed it and knowing what I know I can't imagine ever failing it, other than with awful dice rolling in the final part. I don't know, perhaps I discern the mechanics and design of these scenarios quicker or more easily than a lot of players because a lot of people say they find the scenarios very replayable. That's probably down to my wide experience with interactive narrative and my general ability for discerning and understanding systems.


I thought it was the easiest scenario. Should have been rated one star.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Paul F
Wales
Vale of Glamorgan
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Having played the 1st scenario four or five times and Escape From Innsmouth twice, we tried Rising Tide today. We really enjoyed our four hour session, precisely because it was so different to the previous ones we've attempted.

We certainly didn't find it thin on story during our session, though it's true that the responses from the suspects were very generic and it was the evidence that pointed us in the right direction to solving the case. In retrospect, the story that we enjoyed hinged on the characters' tales, which added to the overall history of Innsmouth without ever really being relevant to the specific case. The story isn't as engrained in the scenario as it might be.

So, as fun as it was, I can see how it's not going to be as re-playable as the other scenarios we've attempted, despite the random selection of the cultists and location. I'd happily play the others solo, but there's not enough depth in this one for the time and effort required in committing to replay it.

Definitely the easiest scenario we've played so far. (Though my wife might disagree as she went insane due to a "crisis of conscience" on the turn before the rest of us solved the final puzzle!)

Great concept - I love the focus on investigation, but there needs to be more relevance in what the cast of suspects is telling you, rather than simply finding the right piece of evidence in the right place.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dean L
United Kingdom
Coventry
West Midlands
flag msg tools
High Flying Bird wrote:
Just as a point of trivia, there is at least one fairly obscure way to get combat in the 'investigative' part of this scenario, but it's something of an outlyer and needs the players to do something pretty stupid... as actually, do a lot of the more surprising events in this game, disappointingly.

For instance, we played the scenario twice with the group and beat it both times: the first we aced; we got 'conclusive' evidence against both culprits and discovered the ritual location (3 out of 3 Objective-wise). The second time we didn't get evidence against anyone (we made deliberate decisions to do some things differently for the sake of experimentation) or discover where the ritual was (0 out of 3 objective-wise) but still were able to 'guess' a correct suspect to follow. This was through a process of elimination: "we didn't find that object there this time so we can rule that person out". This is a flaw in the scenario I mentioned elsewhere. It's essentially mechanical. The suspects will behave the same and mostly say the same things regardless of whether they are a cultist or not. So we also won on the second play-through even though the investigation went badly... pretty unsatisfactory. It is my least favourite scenario. It's far too long to be so easy.

But when I did a virtual playthrough on the App to experiment with the scenario and see everything (it's too long and fiddly for solo play) I found there was a much more dramatic and interesting ending if we had done some things wrong. I'll elaborate in the spoiler:
Spoiler (click to reveal)

For the sake of experimentation I attacked the Deep One Hybrids in detective Blake's basement
Spoiler (click to reveal)
(requires the silver key to enter)
. After that I opened the door from the basement into Blake's room, thus blowing our cover and giving the investigation away to Blake, who, in this game, was a cultist (we knew this as the evidence is in his basement). This changed up the scenario ending considerably. The ritual location was the docks. As well the usual cultists to fight the other suspects were transforming into Deep One hybrids, which was pretty cool. Then, the transforming inhabitants of Innsmouth became a rampaging mob (Riot monster). Then a Star Spawn spawned (I'm unsure how much of this was happening because I was just killing the monsters outright in the App whilst ignoring the ritual. Whether the pace of transformation would have gone slower if I was killing monsters slower I'd have to experiment with). After this point, and with the ritual still uninterrupted (I was deliberately ignoring it to see what would happen) Zadok turned up on his boat and called for us to get onboard to flee. This we did... to get what I'm sure is a fairly obscure alternative ending.

Now, presumably this ending could only happen if Zadok is not a cultist, the ritual happens at the docks and the investigators do badly at stopping the ritual.



Interesting. We finally played this today and got something like that. Followed the correct suspect but
Spoiler (click to reveal)
got attacked by the two suspects, a witch and a cultist, who were shortly joined by two deep ones. Maybe we gave ourselves away - I think at one point we got a Mythos effect that said we didn't know if we had or not


Came entirely down to the wire, with one investigator eliminated, and the other taking a final turn but not quite having enough moves to beat the final puzzle.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Justin Colm
msg tools
mbmb
Deano2099 wrote:
High Flying Bird wrote:
Just as a point of trivia, there is at least one fairly obscure way to get combat in the 'investigative' part of this scenario, but it's something of an outlyer and needs the players to do something pretty stupid... as actually, do a lot of the more surprising events in this game, disappointingly.

For instance, we played the scenario twice with the group and beat it both times: the first we aced; we got 'conclusive' evidence against both culprits and discovered the ritual location (3 out of 3 Objective-wise). The second time we didn't get evidence against anyone (we made deliberate decisions to do some things differently for the sake of experimentation) or discover where the ritual was (0 out of 3 objective-wise) but still were able to 'guess' a correct suspect to follow. This was through a process of elimination: "we didn't find that object there this time so we can rule that person out". This is a flaw in the scenario I mentioned elsewhere. It's essentially mechanical. The suspects will behave the same and mostly say the same things regardless of whether they are a cultist or not. So we also won on the second play-through even though the investigation went badly... pretty unsatisfactory. It is my least favourite scenario. It's far too long to be so easy.

But when I did a virtual playthrough on the App to experiment with the scenario and see everything (it's too long and fiddly for solo play) I found there was a much more dramatic and interesting ending if we had done some things wrong. I'll elaborate in the spoiler:
Spoiler (click to reveal)

For the sake of experimentation I attacked the Deep One Hybrids in detective Blake's basement
Spoiler (click to reveal)
(requires the silver key to enter)
. After that I opened the door from the basement into Blake's room, thus blowing our cover and giving the investigation away to Blake, who, in this game, was a cultist (we knew this as the evidence is in his basement). This changed up the scenario ending considerably. The ritual location was the docks. As well the usual cultists to fight the other suspects were transforming into Deep One hybrids, which was pretty cool. Then, the transforming inhabitants of Innsmouth became a rampaging mob (Riot monster). Then a Star Spawn spawned (I'm unsure how much of this was happening because I was just killing the monsters outright in the App whilst ignoring the ritual. Whether the pace of transformation would have gone slower if I was killing monsters slower I'd have to experiment with). After this point, and with the ritual still uninterrupted (I was deliberately ignoring it to see what would happen) Zadok turned up on his boat and called for us to get onboard to flee. This we did... to get what I'm sure is a fairly obscure alternative ending.

Now, presumably this ending could only happen if Zadok is not a cultist, the ritual happens at the docks and the investigators do badly at stopping the ritual.



Interesting. We finally played this today and got something like that. Followed the correct suspect but
Spoiler (click to reveal)
got attacked by the two suspects, a witch and a cultist, who were shortly joined by two deep ones. Maybe we gave ourselves away - I think at one point we got a Mythos effect that said we didn't know if we had or not


Came entirely down to the wire, with one investigator eliminated, and the other taking a final turn but not quite having enough moves to beat the final puzzle.


That sounds like the standard ending actually so you probably didn't mess up in the investigation. The key is if the former suspects are appearing in addition to the two guilty suspects and then transforming into Deep Ones. If something like that happened then you screwed up somewhere.

But even in the best case scenario Deep Ones will start to spawn if you take too long on the puzzles. 2 sounds about right for a 2 player game. I think you were on for success if you'd survived.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.