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Subject: 1775: Doesn't Live Up To 1812, But Is Good rss

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Jeff
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1775: Rebellion is a light war game, and sequel to 1812: The Invasion of Canada. They have a lot of similarities in play, but there are some important differences between the games. Though good, this is the weaker of the two.

The game can be played by 2-4 people. In it players take on the role of one of four factions: the British Regulars, the Loyalists, the traitorous American regulars, or the equally traitorous colonial militia.

Card play determines troop movement, and special actions that can be taken. Battles are handled through the roll of custom dice. Each faction has it's own unique dice. They tell you what happens in combat. There are no charts to consult! The game is over at the end of a round that sees one side have all of its special "Treaty of Paris" cards out. The winner is the side that has the majority of flags on the board. You put a flag out by completely controlling a colony.

Unlike 1812 where the battle lines were very clear, i.e. the boarder between the Canadas, and the United States, 1775's battle lines are a patchwork of unconsolidated colonies. I prefer the former, but the latter does provide a unique challenge to contend with.

I guess the thing that bothers me the most about the game is its handling of natives. Natives in 1775 are neutral, but are easily swayed to the side of whichever army enters their territory. Those same native units will then change sides if the army they are with is defeated. So, they become these mindless fair-weather friends. Various native tribes at this time were allied with either the British, or the rebelling colonists. Though I'm sure some played both sides against the middle, many were stanch allies of one or the other. This was largely because an enemy native tribe was allied to other side. I would have preferred to see two types of native units, one allied to the British, the other to the rebels.

I did like the ability of third parties to enter into the war. It was realistic and a nice twist to the game.

Overall, I like 1775. That sentiment pales in comparison to the love I have for its predecessor.
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Steve Duke
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Wow, I have a completely opposite opinion to you.

If the native thing bothered you that much, hmm, not sure what to say.

1775 is much more asymmetrical if you like that kind of thing--and I do.

I like them both a lot but if I had to pick, 1775 wins and it is not even close.
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Kevin Duke
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Wynne
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For 1775.

The Native American thing shows a "fickle" nature which works very well in game terms.

And if you play some more, you will find that they are usually not that big a part of the game- an interesting threat sometimes but not a country maker.
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Bob S.
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Thanks for the post, Jeff.

I also find myself with the opposite reaction as you. For me, 1775 is the preferred game over 1812. 1812 is good too, but feels a bit more constrained for me than 1775. This may be due to the relatively "stable" front between Canada and the States. That front still offers plenty of decisions to be made regarding force commitment and strategy for invasion. But the "patchwork" nature of colony control in 1775 and the opportunity for ship/boat movement provide me a more freewheeling sense as sides must decide where to campaign for the different years.

Your mileage may vary! Whichever is preferred, keep playing!
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Bob Shurig
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Springfield
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Sorry Jeff; I'm with Steve, and Kevin, and Bob on this one. I have owned, and played, both games; and the bottom line is that 1775: Rebellion is a more exciting and tense game. The game play is more fluid, and also offers a greater variety of decisions.
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O.Shane Balloun
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No doubt this is the result of some patriotic bias, but 1775 is the better of the two.
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Andrew Prizzi
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West Newton
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1775 is a hit in our house. We haven't tried 1812 as of yet although we'd like to (really looking forward to the French and Indian War game).

The goofiest thing about the Indians in 1775 is that when they come into the game as reinforcements they come in at cities just like anyone else, so you end up with massive native armies appearing in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, etc.

Of course the game isn't super historical, but it is super fun. Pax.
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Jason Jullie
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I have to agree with the other posters here. I own both games and enjoy them, but I think 1775 is clearly the better game. The static front for 1812 makes the game a little less exciting. 1775 has lots of possibilities and threats are from everywhere.
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Alex Drazen
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Another vote for 1775. It basically fired 1812 for me.

Mrs. Drazen dislikes both, but "prefers" 1812. Her reasoning is that the sheer volume of potential decisions in 1775 overwhelms her. 1812 is a little more static; most troops always re-spawn in the same place (only American fled units and the roaming Native American require any actual decision-making).

Also, a lot of people found that Canada was extremely strong in 1812 because of the lopsided factions (3-2) and almost always seemed to win or tie. I have six logged plays of 1812, with the results:

1813 Scenario

Canada wins 5-4
Canada wins 2-1
Canada wins 5-3
USA wins 5-2

Base Game

USA wins 5-1 (the only time I've played this game while in Canada)
Canada wins 4-3 (likely 4-1 if their last faction had moved, but they'd already won)

I discovered the game in early 2013, and didn't start logging plays regularly until 2014, so there were several plays prior. If memory serves, virtually every early play came out in Canada's favor.

I've found 1775 much more dynamic, where I can't play the same strategy every time. When will the French and/or Hessians arrive? Did the USA initially go for Boston or Maryland?

In 1812 it's pretty simple: as Canada, swoop down from Montreal and hold a bunch of border cities, be sure to fortify Queenston/Fort Erie, and then launch a Warship down near Albany to crush reinforcements. As the USA, try to seize York and First Nations, wreak havoc in the weaker Western Canada, hold the line at Detriot, protect your musters, use CD's to block roving NA's, and when ready for the final Truce, try to take over Queenston/Fort Erie. Sure, there's a few extra blocks at the beginning, but there aren't as many reasonable strategies to choose from as to how you deploy them (I think you always want to mix up all the muster areas as Canada, for instance, so they have a big pile of dice, while the Americans only ever get five).

1812's Command Decision ability is considerably more limited than 1775's, since you can only go to homeland or allied areas (except for NA's). Canada's advantage is that it musters right on the front lines and had 3 factions, so its "limited" movement cards don't hurt as much as they should. If I recall, most of Canada's events are better, too.
 
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Lewis Karl
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I also agree that 1775 is the better game. However, I want to play 1812, but when I offer an opponent the choice, its always 1775.
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Doug Ratz
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I liked 1812 when it came out, and have also found it nearly impossible to win as the US (in spite of reading the advice given in the forums there, though we haven't tried the modified setup with a few extra US troops on Lake Erie). Because I liked 1812, I wanted 1775, and it is a great game, and will only get pushed aside if we have 5 players. And, because I like 1775 so much, I can't wait for the 879 Vikings game!
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Jim McNaughton
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sduke wrote:
Wow, I have a completely opposite opinion to you.

If the native thing bothered you that much, hmm, not sure what to say.

1775 is much more asymmetrical if you like that kind of thing--and I do.

I like them both a lot but if I had to pick, 1775 wins and it is not even close.


Yup, very much prefer 1775.
 
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Jelly Pantz
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Quote:
1775: Rebellion is a light war game, and sequel to 1812: The Invasion of Canada. They have a lot of similarities in play, but there are some important differences between the games. Though good, this is the weaker of the two.


You're swimming hard against the current there but as has been said in other comments, your mileage may vary.
 
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Moe45673
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1812 does provide a different experience than 1775. I think 1775 is better because it feels more balanced but I did enjoy the feel of 1812. After all is said and done, I don't need both and sold 1812
 
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Jeff
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There's no simple explanation for anything important any of us do, and yeah the human tragedy consists of the necessity of living with the consequences, under pressure, under pressure. -Courage (For Hugh Maclennan): The Tragically Hip
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jellypantz wrote:
Quote:
1775: Rebellion is a light war game, and sequel to 1812: The Invasion of Canada. They have a lot of similarities in play, but there are some important differences between the games. Though good, this is the weaker of the two.


You're swimming hard against the current there but as has been said in other comments, your mileage may vary.


Meh, sometimes one beats to the march of a different whatever.
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Paul Farrell
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I realise I'm ridiculously late to the table on this one but I'll toss in a vote for 1812. My reasons are all highly logical, I assure you.

1. It was the first game my wife bought me.
2. She bought it from the designer.
3. We live in a town where a battle took place and she bought the game from him very close to the battlefield.
4. Even though the British did most of the heavy lifting I like the fact that the Canadian boys pummelled the Americans.
5. Canada just crushed the Americans in a totally meaningless hockey tournament and I'm bursting with national pride.
6. Did I mention that my wife bought me this game?
7. I'm actually going to cast my vote for the French and Indian war version of this game that I heard was supposed to be produced.

Edit - I just went to the Academy games site and saw the 1754 game. Pre-ordered! I see a three game campaign in the near future!
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Jeph Stahl
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Grimsby
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Never2manygames wrote:
I realise I'm ridiculously late to the table on this one but I'll toss in a vote for 1812. My reasons are all highly logical, I assure you.

1. It was the first game my wife bought me.
2. She bought it from the designer.
3. We live in a town where a battle took place and she bought the game from him very close to the battlefield.


Awesome... I probably sold it to your wife. Glad you like it! Beau and I were blacksmithing at a number of 1812 200 year anniversary events and set up games sales at the same time. Cheers!
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Karsten Engelmann
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Fun to listen to all the folks here arguing about which is better, 1812 or 1775.

The answer is pretty clear...

1754!!!!!!!!

Now, if only those lazy slackers at Academy games would get it published!

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Andrew White
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I wouldn't know, I'm still waiting for mine to arrive!!!!
 
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Benny Bosmans
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I just recently rediscovered 1775 tx to the digital 100% conversion.

All I can say is that the basic system is far better than I first thought.

You know the core of a GREAT game SYSTEM is only revealed by a computer translation.

Not many board games can hold it up when transferred to a computer. But 1775 just like Ticket to Ride live up to it.

So the system is great, as to the version, I guess with every new extension it will get better ...
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Gary Selkirk
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We really like 1812, hands down. However, taken into the fact that 1775 was fought some years earlier, the way the Native Americans are handled in 1775 is absolutely correct, given the period. Those people were dealing with their own issues, aside from being steadily driven West.
Believe it or not, the North American political and boundary situation was far more advanced and, if I must say, more civilized in 1812 as opposed to 1775.
On the one hand, in 1775, the Americans were still trying to establish their own brand of self government, still run by England.
By the time of 1812, just 29 years after 1783, America had been essentially established, to a large degree. But now they had to deal with what must be considered as an outside power (England)interfering with the USA commerce. Two totally different situations indeed.
To my mind Academy Games has handled both wars very well. By the same token, we do like 1775 better. I can hardly wait to see how 1754 is handled. A situation that, in reality, deals with issues between Britain and France but involves the innocence of 'The New World.'
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Gary Selkirk
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grammatoncleric wrote:
No doubt this is the result of some patriotic bias, but 1775 is the better of the two.


After several games of 1775 and having played a lot of 1812, we agreed that we enjoy 1775 more. This has nothing to do with the period - 1812 does a fine job portraying the situation at the time. The simple changes in 1775, primarily the options a command decision result gives you, makes this game a lot more problematic. You must be aware at all times.
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Edward B.
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I haven't had the chance to play this one yet, although I do hope to pick it up eventually.

I love 1812, however, and have to say at least one thing it has in advantage over 1775: you can play with one more person!
 
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R Moore
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Clarkston
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I love both games a lot. But 1812 is definitely more preferred for a number of reasons in my house.

1. International theme, from an American/Canadian family.
2. Wide open map, no tiny territories like in 1775.
3. Asymmetrical teamwork 3 on 2 or less, how many other games can offer such balanced play with 5 players? I love this aspect.
4. Two-nation map. I enjoy the split down the middle of the board rather than the standard area control free-for-all of 1775.
5. Great Lakes focus. Cause more games need an accurate depiction of the Great Lakes on the board. They just do.

That being said, I consider 1775 a Wonderful game. I love the addition of extra factions, using natives as a switchable variable, the character and specials in the cards... etc. but 1812 just personally is mo special to us.
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