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This review is part of my attempt to review as many co-op games as I can. All of my reviews are in the geeklist A Crazy Couple's Co-op Guide: 2013 and onward Edition

Our rating:

Addictive? thumbsup

Long Term Replayability: thumbsdown

Skill Factor: 3

Modes: Co-op
No reason you can't play solo, but you will want to control multiple heroes, probably at least 3.

Players: 2-4

With a couple: Crazily brutal with just 2 heroes. I recommend playing 2 heroes each.

Play Time: 2+ hours

Difficulty: Its really random based on how things come up, and very dependent on the situations in the game. For example, one objective room seems like it would be brutally hard, unless you (like we did) have the one character to perfectly handle the situation and make it almost trivially easy.

Individual/Group Play: Depends on the players; some players see "players score individual XP" as a competitive element. Whether you treat it that way or not is really up to you. If not, you probably want to plan your overall actions as a team a bit, but there's not really enough deep planning to matter much.

Component Quality:



Most of the components are great.
* The miniatures are impressive and have a lot of detail, though a few are very hard to assemble.
* The tiles are thick and have vibrant, strong graphics.
* There's differently colored dice for each player, which is a nice touch.

Some are less great.
* The cards are fine, but the skill and treasure cards are just text and pretty boring looking.
* The room cards just give you a picture of the room (even the name of the same room changes between cards); there's no numbering or reference to help find the appropriate tile.

Some are really bad.
* The assembly instructions refer to the wrong size bases for some models (for example, it says to put the Ogroid on a 40mm base, when it should actually go on a 50mm base), and many copies apparently don't include the correct amount of bases. (Mine was short bases).
* There are no monster cards. The monsters are just full page entries in the book. This is an absolute pain to reference during play.

Rules Quality: The general rules are fine, doing a good job of explaining the game. The layout sometimes makes it hard to look up rules however.
The rules text on monster cards and events is not as good, often having walls of text that take too many words to explain what to do, and mixing together flavor text and game rules in a confusing way. Many times there are abilities/monster actions that are written differently but amount to the same thing.

Mini-Review


In the late 90s, Games Workshop released Warhammer Quest, a truly epic board game that tried to get the feel of an RPG dungeon crawl experince in a boxed set with no GM. Despite overly complicated rules and terrible game balance, the game was a ton of fun and remained an unchallenged ruler of its genre for years. Many people have lamented to long out of print classic. Now, Warhammer Quest...doesn't really return. Let's be very clear on this; if you want the original Warhammer Quest experience, Silver Tower is NOT it. The original was practically bursting with content; each character advanced differnetly, there were towns to visit, and there was a veritable army of monsters detailed in the rules, with rules for encountering all of them.

Silver Tower trims the game to the basics. Heroes only have a few stats, there is minimal advancement and there's a mere dozen monsters (four of which are optional and aren't well integrated into the game).

At its core, Silver Tower is a straight-up dungeon crawl. A party of heroes heads into a monster-filled tower for dubious reasons to battle through hordes of monsters and face perilous traps. There's lot of rolling dice for attacks and damage and counting squares as figures move around the board.

Players pick from 10 different characters (six of which have stat cards and miniatures, 4 of which are just presented as pages in the rulebook) and engage in a series of quests, exploring through tile spaces.

Most of the game is combat. The mechanics are decent, and certainly faster and smoother than the original WHQ. One slight twist is that you roll dice which you will use for your actions; higher dice typically give stronger actions. There's also a pool of common dice that any hero can use each round. You can use dice to move, attack, trigger special abilities and recover wounds.

I really like the action dice mechanic, but I feel like it is underutilized; there's not usually any real options about how to use your high scoring dice, just triggering your big power.

Many of the tiles and events in the game will direct you to read a paragraph in the adventure book with flavor text and instructions. The flavor text is strange; its usually written in an awkward "backward" manner, and generally in the past tense. I'm not a fan of flavor text in general, but this is some of the worst I've seen.

========================================

On first plays, we enjoyed this. It moves fairly quickly and it was fun to battle the monsters and gain new skills. After our first few plays, the shine wore off due to a few problems:

Too many random events
The constant events became tiring; you have a random event or a familiar (little annoying critters that give a penalty until you catch them) pretty much every turn. The big event book, rather than preventing you with a variety of situations that you need to cleverly deal with, presents you with a variety of ways of resolving totally random stuff.

In this event, everyone rolls a die and the low roll takes damage!

But in this event, everyone rolls 2 dice and the one who gets the highest total takes damage!

To be totally different, in this event everyone takes a turn rolling a die until someone rolls a 1, and that player takes damage!

Problematic elements as the difficulty increases
As you gain more skills, two things become apparent:

1) There are not nearly enough skill cards! You can only carry over a limited number of skills from each game, but you can get a lot during the game and its very easy to run out the entire pile! This also makes it very easy to just cycle until everyone gets the skills they want.

2) The power scaling has problems. The main way that the game increases the difficulty as you power up is that, when you defeat all the monsters, what happens depends on a die roll based on how many skills the party has. On a good roll, you get a respite and get to heal wounds. On a bad roll, a group of monsters ambushes you (this is very painful).

Once you get enough skills in the party (which doesn't take that long!), you ALWAYS get ambushed. This means you either have to get constantly walloped by monsters, or do strange gamey stuff like leaving a small monster alive to run around behind you nipping at your heels so you never run out of monsters. This isn't much fun. (It also gets very strange when a room has "when you defeat all the monsters" special text, and you don't defeat all of the monsters until 3 rooms away because you let a Scutling follow you along).

Further, this means:
* Respites are the main way to bring back a hero that was defeated, so you stop being able to revive heroes. Since a random nasty event/attack can easily defeat a hero, this means you can be knocked out of the game pretty randomly.

* Respites are the ONLY way of recharging a hero few abilities, so some abilities become "once per game" once you get enough experience. This isn't much fun.

* Respites are the main way of getting treasure, so you just stop getting treasure. This also isn't much fun.

Annoying dungeon elements
The events you encounter as part of each dungeon are a nice way of providing a variety of new challenges, but they seem to be of the mind that if one event/special rule is good, two must be better and three is awesome. Having a wave of weak monsters that respawns so you have to fight them is an interesting twist and surprise. Having them respawn a second time is irritating. Having them respawn (I kid you not) 6 times is Sisyphean. Along similar lines, having a board where you have to roll a die every single space you move to potentially lose your move, or having obstacles that heal monsters AND reduce hero actions AND change the event rules, all at once...its just too much. Just do one of those things; that's enough to change stuff up, and save the other special rules for another occasion!

Some of them also are odd with replays; on the first play, you must make what amounts to a totally random decision. On a later play, you'll know which decision is correct.

========================================

The App
There's a supplemental app available for the game. It is not required. It is a character tracker, and I think the main point of it is to make you individually buy a bunch of extra characters. The app has a pretty terrible layout; you need to cycle between something like 5 different screens to see all of your character. Despite that, its not like they actually filled the screens for visibility; the actual text is tiny, so you might be looking at your stats screen that shows 3 numbers in a small font and has the rest of the page blank.

You can also purchase extra skills in the app; while more variety is badly needed, there's no way to sync characters from multiple devices together (or have multiple characters active at once in one app), so if you take that approach every member in the party can get the best skills.

========================================

Wrap-up

While designed as a campaign, I think this would actually be a lot more fun if you just play a set of a few games; not so many that you run out the skills and get into the "doing the same thing" over and over again. However, that takes some tweaking of the game design.

If you want a deep campaign with character building, this is a total miss.

If you want to play a battle heavy dungeon crawl with cool heroes and some interesting monsters and obstacles to overcome, this might be worth a look, though I think if you are planning on getting just one dungeon crawl I'd hold out to see how some of the other upcoming games in the genre turn out.

While I've griped about a lot of the individual elements, I think a lot of fantasy-adventure fans are going to have a fun time with this.

========================================
Negatives
* Monster stats poorly designed for play; trying to look them up out of the book all the time is a royal pain!
* Overload of special events and rules.
* Too much time spent looking up stuff in books and tables.
* Not enough skills.
* Poor scaling by player count.
* Poor scaling as characters increase in power.
* Lousy flavor text.
* Assembling the models takes time, supplies and some skill.
* Only 1/10 female characters, or 2/25ish (with a few with no defined gender) with the app characters. This is awful even by the standards of fantasy games.

Positives
* Heroes have neat abilities and good variety.
* While there's not a lot of monsters, the variety between the little monsters and the big threats is good.
* Low set-up time.
* A lot of the basic system plays smoothly (looking up monster actions does not).
* Several different quests, each with their own twists.
* Nice looking tiles and models.

Images thanks to the BGG Gallery and ConraDargo and Intourette
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James Butler
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Still far, far, FAR superior to the original - which is viewed with significantly rose-tinted nostalgia glasses by many. I applaud the bold mechanical innovations offered by Silver Tower - but do agree with your assessment of too few skill cards (and, by extension, treasure cards). The game is all out action (much like the recent Deathwatch Overkill), and personally I love having hordes of enemies to fight, judging when best to press on, and when best to risk a moment for respite. Given your identification of so many positives, I think your low 'star rating' is way off, based more on your opinion of meta details rather than the actual gameplay.

Too few female characters sums up the entire GW range, sadly, so the ratio herein should not be unexpected. That said, my favourite hero is easily the additional Dark Elf Sorceress.
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Clockpunk wrote:
Still far, far, FAR superior to the original - which is viewed with significantly rose-tinted nostalgia glasses by many.

I think the original was a fairly terrible game in most ways, and house-ruled the heck out of it; but it was a very expansive game that I played hundreds and hundreds of games of. It was fun to level up the characters, and there was an enormous supply of different monsters, treasures and abilities. Silver Tower got boring for us in under a dozen!

Quote:
I applaud the bold mechanical innovations offered by Silver Tower - but do agree with your assessment of too few skill cards (and, by extension, treasure cards). The game is all out action (much like the recent Deathwatch Overkill), and personally I love having hordes of enemies to fight, judging when best to press on, and when best to risk a moment for respite. Given your identification of so many positives, I think your low 'star rating' is way off, based more on your opinion of meta details rather than the actual gameplay.

I don't really see much innovation, nor do I see "all out action" (though I agree that Deathwatch Overkill rates high in that department!); too much time looking up stuff on tables and reading overly long and dull text entries.

And there's really no "when to risk a moment for respite" - early on you take a respite after finishing killing the monsters reliably, then you very quickly you lose the ability to take respites at all.

However, the core moving and fighting mechanic does work very well. I feel like with a generous dose of house rules this could be a very cool game, and I think its good for a few plays. But there's a whole lot of other miniature based dungeon crawls on the way.
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Kevin Outlaw
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StormKnight wrote:


And there's really no "when to risk a moment for respite" - early on you take a respite after finishing killing the monsters reliably, then you very quickly you lose the ability to take respites at all.



Be sure to check out the FAQ. The respite rules got a do-over.
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RedMonkeyBoy wrote:
StormKnight wrote:


And there's really no "when to risk a moment for respite" - early on you take a respite after finishing killing the monsters reliably, then you very quickly you lose the ability to take respites at all.



Be sure to check out the FAQ. The respite rules got a do-over.


Thanks for pointing it out. Funnily enough, that's very close to the first house rules we tried for respites.

Though with 3 skills each you've still got an 80% chance of being ambushed.

They make trying to rest optional though, which is quite a big change.
 
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azza rein
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"Only 1/10 female characters, or 2/25ish (with a few with no defined gender) with the app characters. This is awful even by the standards of fantasy games."

Positive for me.

De gustibus non est disputandum.

While your points on the game are valid -- 3.5 stars??? What modern day dungeon crawler co-op are you playing that makes this score justified?
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Matt Price
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Thanks for the review, I wish I'd waited for some feedback before diving in to this one too.

While I wouldn't call this game a 3 (maybe a 5 or 6?) it was a big disappointment. I also can't stand the new figures' art style, how huge and goofy looking the new figures are. The expansions and the next big box will likely be a miss for me!
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mattprice wrote:
Thanks for the review, I wish I'd waited for some feedback before diving in to this one too.

While I wouldn't call this game a 3 (maybe a 5 or 6?) it was a big disappointment. I also can't stand the new figures' art style, how huge and goofy looking the new figures are. The expansions and the next big box will likely be a miss for me!


The errata for the respites might push it up a tad - the existing respites were REALLY problematic! It definitely takes a big hit in my book for how hard it was to play the monsters out of the book. I made big stat cards for all the monsters to make it more playable. Not as much effort as we went through with WHQ...but, well, I expect games to have come a long ways since then!
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I'm genuinely curious - I've never heard of anyone running out of skill cards before! Can you give some more info on how it happened? Like, how many heroes you had in the game, how many skill cards did they have at the start of the trial, etc.?
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JamesMHewitt wrote:
I'm genuinely curious - I've never heard of anyone running out of skill cards before! Can you give some more info on how it happened? Like, how many heroes you had in the game, how many skill cards did they have at the start of the trial, etc.?

Probably happened in quest 3. In the original rules, with 4 heroes starting with 2 skills each, you can't get a respite so every time you run out of monsters you get a whole new batch (we hadn't hit on the "leave one little thing alive" yet), so you got TONS of XP.

I think we houserules respites after that, but I think we were still mostly running out the skill pile in the next game; just cycling through the last few ones left that we didn't want.

The errata for the game is a long way from fixing all of its problems, but it does patch some problems that were very serious; the old respite rules were really practically unplayable. And the un-errated Aetheric Surge on the Mistweaver could generate crazy amounts of dice if you met a big group of monsters, while stunning all of them in the process.
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Yeah, it's really easy to cycle through enemies if you want to take the time to farm.

On the review, I think it was a bit harsh and haven't played the original, but think the complaints were pretty valid. Still not sure how I feel, I'd want to get at least a full campaign done first...
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spiralingcadaver wrote:
Yeah, it's really easy to cycle through enemies if you want to take the time to farm.


It was really easy to cycle through enemies even when it was dragging horribly, we were really bored with it, and we wanted to get on with getting through the dungeon.

Quote:
On the review, I think it was a bit harsh and haven't played the original, but think the complaints were pretty valid. Still not sure how I feel, I'd want to get at least a full campaign done first...

It is entirely possible that my review would be a little less harsh if I hadn't played the original either. The original had many, many problems, but what it tried to do was very impressive. The new one doesn't even make an attempt.

But, everyone likes different things. I've gathered for example, that I'm atypical in being annoyed by the "lots of events that just have different totally random rolls".
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Matt Blunderbuss
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A ton of rules errata have recently been published. These fixes include how ambushes happen, among other things. Try it again!
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BGGBlunderbuss wrote:
A ton of rules errata have recently been published. These fixes include how ambushes happen, among other things. Try it again!

The ambush/respite change is a very big deal and probably merits at least a boost to the rating I gave.

However, "trying it again" wouldn't make a big difference; after a truly dismal game of unending ambushes, we adopted a house-rule very similar to the errata. It still suffers a lot from from too few skills, too much dull text and too many constant events.

In theory I am intending to come up with some tweaks to play a shorter campaign and reduce the event glut, but I don't know if I'll actually go through the effort.
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Clockpunk wrote:
Still far, far, FAR superior to the original - which is viewed with significantly rose-tinted nostalgia glasses by many.


ST is a good game, and is pretty fun - but the original WHQ is absolutely bonkers FUN. Of course this depends on which iteration of Warhammer you like and what your tastes are - original WHQ carries with it the grim humor and zaniness of early GW rules/products, whereas ST has the humorless, grimdark 40K-ish aesthetic of modern-day GW.

For me, a big minus for ST is the lack of between-missions play, which was one of the best aspects of WHQ and possibly my favorite part of the game. Hopefully, Shadows Over Hammerhal helps introduce this to the new WHQ series.

Out of all GW's recent games output, I place ST somewhere in the middle alongside Burning of Prospero and Assassinorum. Betrayal at Calth and Deathwatch Overkill are my favorites, with Lost Patrol at the bottom.
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Patrick Tovey
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As someone who is looking for a fantasy based dungeon crawl with upgradeable character progression, this review along with the replies is very helpful. I'm still on the fence but a little better educated.
 
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LesBakers wrote:
...with upgradeable character progression...


This is the bit where Silver Tower is likely to fall short for you. The character progression is really, really minimal.

Glad the review and discussion have been helpful though.
 
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While many readers may feel that the original review of 3.5 was a bit low, it was interesting to read a mostly non-positive review of the game. Coming from decades of playing GW Warhammer Fantasy and 40K back in my youth, I had this game almost bought to rekindle that nostalgia, but having read this review, I am keeping away from it until a second edition or a slicker system comes along.

Knowing GW, this probably won't happen. Oh well, I'll keep my dungeon crawling, not so much inside the dungeon, but outside, with Mage Knight. I might just bought some GW miniatures to pimp my MK copy though.
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guigtexas wrote:
Coming from decades of playing GW Warhammer Fantasy and 40K back in my youth, I had this game almost bought to rekindle that nostalgia, but having read this review, I am keeping away from it until a second edition or a slicker system comes along.

Knowing GW, this probably won't happen. Oh well, I'll keep my dungeon crawling, not so much inside the dungeon, but outside, with Mage Knight. I might just bought some GW miniatures to pimp my MK copy though.


Are you aware they have already released a sequel, Shadows Over Hammerhal? It has several refinements to the system, but replaces co-op play with a dungeonmaster.
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StormKnight wrote:

* The room cards just give you a picture of the room (even the name of the same room changes between cards); there's no numbering or reference to help find the appropriate tile.


This is identical to the original Warhammer Quest. Picture of the board piece on the randomly drawn deck card. No numbering or reference on those cards either.


StormKnight wrote:

* The assembly instructions refer to the wrong size bases for some models (for example, it says to put the Ogroid on a 40mm base, when it should actually go on a 50mm base), and many copies apparently don't include the correct amount of bases. (Mine was short bases).


Base size issues were addressed in the Silver Tower FAQ.

Early versions of the game were short miniature bases. (My set was missing either two or three, I don't recall) This was identified really early on and the retail locations were provided small sealed plastic bags with the additional bases to be provided to purchasers. Check with your retail location if you were short bases, they should be able to get them to you. If you purchased from GW retail store they gave you the pack of additional bases when you purchased the game, or you can contact GW Customer Service for assistance. Ebay ... you're at the whim of the seller, but you can always try GW Customer Service. (Other users had issues with missing bases as well, so it wasn't just you https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/1578383/missing-bases )

StormKnight wrote:

* There are no monster cards. The monsters are just full page entries in the book. This is an absolute pain to reference during play.


Monster rules are in the back of the book, a page turn or so away from the events table. A 'monster card deck' would be a nice addition but the full A4 size pages are pretty easy to read. Those original Warhammer Quest monster cards had awfully small text.

locustofdeath wrote:
...For me, a big minus for ST is the lack of between-missions play, which was one of the best aspects of WHQ and possibly my favorite part of the game. Hopefully, Shadows Over Hammerhal helps introduce this to the new WHQ series.


The lack of 'between-missions play' was kind-of addressed in that the heroes are stuck in the tower until they get out ... or die. So, they can't really 'head back to town to do things' between the missions for the pieces of the amulet. (They also never get thirsty, or hungry ... and only apparently require any kind of respite when wounded.) (Though the 'events in town table' was always a blast in the old WH:Q!)
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Aforesaidraven wrote:
StormKnight wrote:

* The room cards just give you a picture of the room (even the name of the same room changes between cards); there's no numbering or reference to help find the appropriate tile.


This is identical to the original Warhammer Quest. Picture of the board piece on the randomly drawn deck card. No numbering or reference on those cards either.

Given that I regard the original WHQ as ambitious but terribly designed, saying "WHQ did it that way to" isn't exactly praise in my mind.

The WHQ tiles were much less "interesting" looking than the Silver Tower tiles; however, they were single sided, only a few uniform sizes, and were either generic (hallways) or had strong distinctive features to them. It is very easy to look at a picture and see "ah, its the chessboard room" or "the one with the drain". The Silver Tower tiles are double sided, can't be stacked neatly as they come in a variety of sizes, and many of them lack clear easily identifiable features - so it can be a pain to find the right tile!

Of course, except for the objective room in WHQ, finding the exact correct tile was totally cosmetic - room, passage, corner or T-Junction was all that mattered.

Quote:
(Other users had issues with missing bases as well, so it wasn't just you https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/1578383/missing-bases )

Yeah, I'd heard it was widespread enough to be worth mentioning. The store I bought it from had not been given replacements from GW, but they had spare bases lying around and sent the right ones to me.

StormKnight wrote:

* There are no monster cards. The monsters are just full page entries in the book. This is an absolute pain to reference during play.


Monster rules are in the back of the book, a page turn or so away from the events table. A 'monster card deck' would be a nice addition but the full A4 size pages are pretty easy to read. Those original Warhammer Quest monster cards had awfully small text.[/q]
We'll have to disagree on whether the book is easy to use.

WHQ was also pretty unusable; we wound up making (by hand) stat cards for all the monsters in the game. Now that was devotion to a game!

Quote:
The lack of 'between-missions play' was kind-of addressed in that the heroes are stuck in the tower until they get out ... or die. So, they can't really 'head back to town to do things' between the missions for the pieces of the amulet. (They also never get thirsty, or hungry ... and only apparently require any kind of respite when wounded.) (Though the 'events in town table' was always a blast in the old WH:Q!)

Having a thematic explanation doesn't mean the fun is there.
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