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Chris Buhl
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I have one free credit there, and after listening to Valiant Ambition I realized I know little of the war and would like to know more. I read Battle Cry of Freedom about the Civil War, and if there is a "version" of that for the American Revolution I'd love to know about it.

Thanks!

Chris
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James D
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Well, The Glorious Cause by Robert Middlekauff is the AmRev volume of the Oxford History of the United States (so it's part of the same series as Battle Cry of Freedom), also Almost a Miricle by John Ferling is excellent. I don't use Audible so I don't know if they're available there, but they are fairly standard works.
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Chris Buhl
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Excellent, thanks! They're both on Audible, so now I have a decision to make. Time to read some reviews I suppose. Do you have any thoughts on which is better, or what the relative strengths and weaknesses of them are?

In any case, thanks much for the recommendations.
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CJ
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The Revolutions podcast on itunes covers the American Revolution as its second such, and is free (and good).
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Chris Buhl
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I see that Almost a Miracle is by Ferling, whose book A Leap in the Dark is on my list, so I lean toward that. Then I see he has a book titled Whirlwind, that is about 10 hours shorter as audio, another one volume history of the Revolution. Now I'm truly torn.
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elgin_j wrote:
The Revolutions podcast on itunes covers the American Revolution as its second such, and is free (and good).


I appreciate that reference. Sadly, I binge listened to his first podcast, History of Rome. I went through the whole series just after he finished with it. I found that about 2/3 of the way through his approach took a turn that I found to make it nearly unbearable. I finished, but couldn't bring myself to start Revolutions. What I thought happened was he started getting really into cracking jokes, as if he'd gotten some feedback that he was funny. But he went way too far with it for my taste, and his jokes seemed to make light of the material, so it ended up seeming like a tweener between a straight history podcast and something like The Dollop. I'm not sure I'd have had the same experience if I'd listened to him every week or two as he went along, it might have been more noticeable because I was going through 1 or 2 episodes at a time, many days a week. It particularly stunk because I didn't think he was very funny, but did think he was a very good history podcaster. So as I said, I'm averse to Revolutions, which is a shame. I should probably give it a try, although I'm also slammed with other podcasts that I'm way behind on.

Well, that's a long winded way to ask, do you notice anything like that listening to Revolutions? I'm well aware that I'm stating purely personal preferences, and I'm not trying to disparage him.
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Jason Nier
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I would second The Glorious Cause. Outstanding.
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+1 Glorious Cause and the other previous book (Rise to Rebellion) are great.

Actually anything by Jeff Shaara (or his Dad, Michael Shaara did) is great.
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fatgreta wrote:
I see that Almost a Miracle is by Ferling, whose book A Leap in the Dark is on my list, so I lean toward that. Then I see he has a book titled Whirlwind, that is about 10 hours shorter as audio, another one volume history of the Revolution. Now I'm truly torn.


Almost a Miracle is excellent. Highly recommend!
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Peter Rich
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Ferling writes very well. I found "Almost a Miracle" quite compelling.
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fatgreta wrote:
I see that Almost a Miracle is by Ferling, whose book A Leap in the Dark is on my list, so I lean toward that. Then I see he has a book titled Whirlwind, that is about 10 hours shorter as audio, another one volume history of the Revolution. Now I'm truly torn.
Almost a Miracle is more of a military history, covering the campaigns and battles of the various armies as well as their overall strategies for each year; the political aspects are covered as well but without the same level of detail, and largely to give context to the events happening in the war. A Leap in the Dark by my understanding (I haven't read it) is the reverse of Almost a Miracle, it focuses primarily on the Revolution as a political event with the war receiving less attention. Whirlwind is a more concise overall history of both the Revolution and the war, giving a more evenhanded account but with less detail.
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fatgreta wrote:
elgin_j wrote:
The Revolutions podcast on itunes covers the American Revolution as its second such, and is free (and good).


I appreciate that reference. Sadly, I binge listened to his first podcast, History of Rome. I went through the whole series just after he finished with it. I found that about 2/3 of the way through his approach took a turn that I found to make it nearly unbearable. I finished, but couldn't bring myself to start Revolutions. What I thought happened was he started getting really into cracking jokes, as if he'd gotten some feedback that he was funny. But he went way too far with it for my taste, and his jokes seemed to make light of the material, so it ended up seeming like a tweener between a straight history podcast and something like The Dollop. I'm not sure I'd have had the same experience if I'd listened to him every week or two as he went along, it might have been more noticeable because I was going through 1 or 2 episodes at a time, many days a week. It particularly stunk because I didn't think he was very funny, but did think he was a very good history podcaster. So as I said, I'm averse to Revolutions, which is a shame. I should probably give it a try, although I'm also slammed with other podcasts that I'm way behind on.

Well, that's a long winded way to ask, do you notice anything like that listening to Revolutions? I'm well aware that I'm stating purely personal preferences, and I'm not trying to disparage him.


I know what you are talking about and his style has not fundamentally shifted.I don't recall much by way of jokes or excessive mirth although he does make frequent light-hearted comments which may be what you're referring to. It was most noticeable during the second revolution covered - the American (most likely because he is American and felt comfortable doing so) - and I found it irritated me slightly but this podcast is definitely more polished than The History of Rome.

Personally I found his coverage of the American Revolution slightly cloying but the others have been very good. I've listened to other history podcasters but most are very dry in style and presentation and he far surpasses them. Sometimes his presentation style does detract from the material but overall I think it is a positive aspect of the show. I recommend that you give it a listen - it starts with the English Civil War - and then make a decision as to whether you want to push onto the others (American, French, Haitian, South American [currently]).
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elgin_j wrote:
fatgreta wrote:
elgin_j wrote:
The Revolutions podcast on itunes covers the American Revolution as its second such, and is free (and good).


I appreciate that reference. Sadly, I binge listened to his first podcast, History of Rome. I went through the whole series just after he finished with it. I found that about 2/3 of the way through his approach took a turn that I found to make it nearly unbearable. I finished, but couldn't bring myself to start Revolutions. What I thought happened was he started getting really into cracking jokes, as if he'd gotten some feedback that he was funny. But he went way too far with it for my taste, and his jokes seemed to make light of the material, so it ended up seeming like a tweener between a straight history podcast and something like The Dollop. I'm not sure I'd have had the same experience if I'd listened to him every week or two as he went along, it might have been more noticeable because I was going through 1 or 2 episodes at a time, many days a week. It particularly stunk because I didn't think he was very funny, but did think he was a very good history podcaster. So as I said, I'm averse to Revolutions, which is a shame. I should probably give it a try, although I'm also slammed with other podcasts that I'm way behind on.

Well, that's a long winded way to ask, do you notice anything like that listening to Revolutions? I'm well aware that I'm stating purely personal preferences, and I'm not trying to disparage him.


I know what you are talking about and his style has not fundamentally shifted.I don't recall much by way of jokes or excessive mirth although he does make frequent light-hearted comments which may be what you're referring to. It was most noticeable during the second revolution covered - the American (most likely because he is American and felt comfortable doing so) - and I found it irritated me slightly but this podcast is definitely more polished than The History of Rome.

Personally I found his coverage of the American Revolution slightly cloying but the others have been very good. I've listened to other history podcasters but most are very dry in style and presentation and he far surpasses them. Sometimes his presentation style does detract from the material but overall I think it is a positive aspect of the show. I recommend that you give it a listen - it starts with the English Civil War - and then make a decision as to whether you want to push onto the others (American, French, Haitian, South American [currently]).


You also have to be willing to put up with Mike Duncan's constant mispronunciation of names and words in languages other than English.
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CJ
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fightinlegalist1 wrote:
elgin_j wrote:
fatgreta wrote:
elgin_j wrote:
The Revolutions podcast on itunes covers the American Revolution as its second such, and is free (and good).


I appreciate that reference. Sadly, I binge listened to his first podcast, History of Rome. I went through the whole series just after he finished with it. I found that about 2/3 of the way through his approach took a turn that I found to make it nearly unbearable. I finished, but couldn't bring myself to start Revolutions. What I thought happened was he started getting really into cracking jokes, as if he'd gotten some feedback that he was funny. But he went way too far with it for my taste, and his jokes seemed to make light of the material, so it ended up seeming like a tweener between a straight history podcast and something like The Dollop. I'm not sure I'd have had the same experience if I'd listened to him every week or two as he went along, it might have been more noticeable because I was going through 1 or 2 episodes at a time, many days a week. It particularly stunk because I didn't think he was very funny, but did think he was a very good history podcaster. So as I said, I'm averse to Revolutions, which is a shame. I should probably give it a try, although I'm also slammed with other podcasts that I'm way behind on.

Well, that's a long winded way to ask, do you notice anything like that listening to Revolutions? I'm well aware that I'm stating purely personal preferences, and I'm not trying to disparage him.


I know what you are talking about and his style has not fundamentally shifted.I don't recall much by way of jokes or excessive mirth although he does make frequent light-hearted comments which may be what you're referring to. It was most noticeable during the second revolution covered - the American (most likely because he is American and felt comfortable doing so) - and I found it irritated me slightly but this podcast is definitely more polished than The History of Rome.

Personally I found his coverage of the American Revolution slightly cloying but the others have been very good. I've listened to other history podcasters but most are very dry in style and presentation and he far surpasses them. Sometimes his presentation style does detract from the material but overall I think it is a positive aspect of the show. I recommend that you give it a listen - it starts with the English Civil War - and then make a decision as to whether you want to push onto the others (American, French, Haitian, South American [currently]).


You also have to be willing to put up with Mike Duncan's constant mispronunciation of names and words in languages other than English.


That is very unfair. Only a native speaker of a language will ever be able to pronounce a name flawlessly, and even then...
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Roi espino
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Totally unfair in my opinion

At least with Spanish he does rather good job taking in consideration he is not studying the language. A few mistakes sometimes but I totally can understand it.

Probably it sounded worse with French.
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Chris Buhl
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In the History of Rome he stated pretty clearly that he was butchering some pronunciations and apologized for it. I'm not sure it would be reasonable to expect much more.
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Chris Buhl
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Molon Labe wrote:
fatgreta wrote:
I see that Almost a Miracle is by Ferling, whose book A Leap in the Dark is on my list, so I lean toward that. Then I see he has a book titled Whirlwind, that is about 10 hours shorter as audio, another one volume history of the Revolution. Now I'm truly torn.
Almost a Miracle is more of a military history, covering the campaigns and battles of the various armies as well as their overall strategies for each year; the political aspects are covered as well but without the same level of detail, and largely to give context to the events happening in the war. A Leap in the Dark by my understanding (I haven't read it) is the reverse of Almost a Miracle, it focuses primarily on the Revolution as a political event with the war receiving less attention. Whirlwind is a more concise overall history of both the Revolution and the war, giving a more evenhanded account but with less detail.


Thanks for this breakdown. I think Whirlwind might be what I'm hoping for, I will give it a go.

Thanks to all for your feedback.
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Edward Pundyk
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elgin_j wrote:
fightinlegalist1 wrote:
elgin_j wrote:
fatgreta wrote:
elgin_j wrote:
The Revolutions podcast on itunes covers the American Revolution as its second such, and is free (and good).


I appreciate that reference. Sadly, I binge listened to his first podcast, History of Rome. I went through the whole series just after he finished with it. I found that about 2/3 of the way through his approach took a turn that I found to make it nearly unbearable. I finished, but couldn't bring myself to start Revolutions. What I thought happened was he started getting really into cracking jokes, as if he'd gotten some feedback that he was funny. But he went way too far with it for my taste, and his jokes seemed to make light of the material, so it ended up seeming like a tweener between a straight history podcast and something like The Dollop. I'm not sure I'd have had the same experience if I'd listened to him every week or two as he went along, it might have been more noticeable because I was going through 1 or 2 episodes at a time, many days a week. It particularly stunk because I didn't think he was very funny, but did think he was a very good history podcaster. So as I said, I'm averse to Revolutions, which is a shame. I should probably give it a try, although I'm also slammed with other podcasts that I'm way behind on.

Well, that's a long winded way to ask, do you notice anything like that listening to Revolutions? I'm well aware that I'm stating purely personal preferences, and I'm not trying to disparage him.


I know what you are talking about and his style has not fundamentally shifted.I don't recall much by way of jokes or excessive mirth although he does make frequent light-hearted comments which may be what you're referring to. It was most noticeable during the second revolution covered - the American (most likely because he is American and felt comfortable doing so) - and I found it irritated me slightly but this podcast is definitely more polished than The History of Rome.

Personally I found his coverage of the American Revolution slightly cloying but the others have been very good. I've listened to other history podcasters but most are very dry in style and presentation and he far surpasses them. Sometimes his presentation style does detract from the material but overall I think it is a positive aspect of the show. I recommend that you give it a listen - it starts with the English Civil War - and then make a decision as to whether you want to push onto the others (American, French, Haitian, South American [currently]).


You also have to be willing to put up with Mike Duncan's constant mispronunciation of names and words in languages other than English.


That is very unfair. Only a native speaker of a language will ever be able to pronounce a name flawlessly, and even then...


Problem is that he doesn't even try.
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Edward Pundyk
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fatgreta wrote:
In the History of Rome he stated pretty clearly that he was butchering some pronunciations and apologized for it. I'm not sure it would be reasonable to expect much more.


He could actually find out how to correctly pronounce the names and/or words and then consistently do so. It doesn't seem to be asking too much if he wants to be taken seriously.
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Edward Pundyk
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celacanto wrote:
Totally unfair in my opinion

At least with Spanish he does rather good job taking in consideration he is not studying the language. A few mistakes sometimes but I totally can understand it.

Probably it sounded worse with French.


It did. It was pure butchery of the language IMO.
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Chris Brooks
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fatgreta wrote:
I have one free credit there, and after listening to Valiant Ambition I realized I know little of the war and would like to know more.


Thanks for the reminder on Valiant Ambition. My son is currently in his second year at West Point and I've been interested in Benedict Arnold and related events. Found this in audio form at my local library... hopefully I can finish this in 21 days!
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Chris Buhl
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CaptainCaveman wrote:
fatgreta wrote:
I have one free credit there, and after listening to Valiant Ambition I realized I know little of the war and would like to know more.


Thanks for the reminder on Valiant Ambition. My son is currently in his second year at West Point and I've been interested in Benedict Arnold and related events. Found this in audio form at my local library... hopefully I can finish this in 21 days!


I'd be interested to know what you think of his treatment of Arnold in that book. I found it interesting, but knew nothing beyond the grade school history narrative that he was a traitor and he got caught.

I grew up in Cornwall, about 20 minutes from West Point. Saw lots and lots of Army sports events over the years. Just this year I made it back to the military history museum there, which is always a treat. Congratulations to your son for making it in, and into the second year.
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Tom Willcockson
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Just reading "Angel in the Whirlwind" and it is quite good as a one volume history. Also second "The Glorious Cause". Enjoyed "Valiant Ambition" although I wish the author had gone into a little more detail on Arnold's post-treason career.
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