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Donald
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Shutting down Planned Parenthood really save a bunch of lives, didn't it Texas?

Texas has highest maternal mortality rate in developed world

Quote:
The rate of Texas women who died from complications related to their pregnancy doubled from 2010 to 2014, a new study has found, for an estimated maternal mortality rate that is unmatched in any other state and the rest of the developed world.

The finding comes from a report, appearing in the September issue of the journal Obstetrics and Gynecology, that the maternal mortality rate in the United States increased between 2000 and 2014, even while the rest of the world succeeded in reducing its rate. Excluding California, where maternal mortality declined, and Texas, where it surged, the estimated number of maternal deaths per 100,000 births rose to 23.8 in 2014 from 18.8 in 2000 – or about 27%.

But the report singled out Texas for special concern, saying the doubling of mortality rates in a two-year period was hard to explain “in the absence of war, natural disaster, or severe economic upheaval”.

From 2000 to the end of 2010, Texas’s estimated maternal mortality rate hovered between 17.7 and 18.6 per 100,000 births. But after 2010, that rate had leaped to 33 deaths per 100,000, and in 2014 it was 35.8. Between 2010-2014, more than 600 women died for reasons related to their pregnancies.

No other state saw a comparable increase.

In the wake of the report, reproductive health advocates are blaming the increase on Republican-led budget cuts that decimated the ranks of Texas’s reproductive healthcare clinics. In 2011, just as the spike began, the Texas state legislature cut $73.6m from the state’s family planning budget of $111.5m. The two-thirds cut forced more than 80 family planning clinics to shut down across the state. The remaining clinics managed to provide services – such as low-cost or free birth control, cancer screenings and well-woman exams – to only half as many women as before.

At the same time, Texas eliminated all Planned Parenthood clinics – whether or not they provided abortion services – from the state program that provides poor women with preventative healthcare. Previously, Planned Parenthood clinics in Texas offered cancer screenings and contraception to more than 130,000 women.

In 2013, Texas restored funding to the family planning budget to original levels. But the healthcare providers who survived the initial cuts reported struggles to restore services to their original levels.

Indeed, the report said it was “puzzling” that Texas’s maternal mortality rate rose only modestly from 2000 to 2010 before doubling between 2011 and 2012. The researchers, hailing from the University of Maryland, Boston University’s school of public health and Stanford University’s medical school, called for further study. But they noted that starting in 2011, Texas drastically reduced the number of women’s health clinics within its borders.

The report comes just as public health advocates are raising questions about Texas’s ability to prepare for the Zika virus, which is transmitted by a common species of mosquito and has been linked to severe birth defects. The World Health Organization has advised women in areas of local transmission to delay pregnancy.

Texas is one of several southern states where health officials say there is a risk of a local outbreak. But about half the state lacks ready access to OB-GYN care, making it difficult for women to obtain contraception or for pregnant women to confirm the health of their babies. Just this month, Texas’s health department drew fire for allocating $1.6m of the $18m the state budgets for low-income women’s family planning to an anti-abortion group that does not provide basic health services.

“There is a need to redouble efforts to prevent maternal deaths and improve maternity care for the 4 million US women giving birth each year,” the authors said.
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G Rowls
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it's Texas - everythings BIGGER.
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Erik Henry
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Also they chose not to expand Medicaid under the ACA, leaving many poor women uninsured.
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Moshe Callen
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ἄνδρα μοι ἔννεπε, μοῦσα, πολύτροπον, ὃς μάλα πολλὰ/ πλάγχθη, ἐπεὶ Τροίης ἱερὸν πτολίεθρον ἔπερσεν./...
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Yup. Pro-Life-- well, not women's lives anyway
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T
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Yep, in the last 20 years, under a GOP-controlled government (all three branches), Texas has declined in numerous areas of public health and welfare - from the rate of uninsured families with children, to spending per student on education, to the quality of health care.
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J
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Lexington
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Sometimes the price of Freedom is a few inconsequential women. Or something. soblue
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Moshe Callen
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ἄνδρα μοι ἔννεπε, μοῦσα, πολύτροπον, ὃς μάλα πολλὰ/ πλάγχθη, ἐπεὶ Τροίης ἱερὸν πτολίεθρον ἔπερσεν./...
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μῆνιν ἄειδε θεὰ Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος/ οὐλομένην, ἣ μυρί᾽ Ἀχαιοῖς ἄλγε᾽ ἔθηκε,/...
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Why do we still need feminism? This is one of many reasons why.
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Steve Fitt
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Chang Mai
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whac3 wrote:
Why do we still need feminism? This is one of many reasons why.

This is the sort of reason that led me to suggest an Amendment to require that 1 Senator from each state be a woman. Voted on by both sexes but a woman.

Half the population will always be female so it is a quota that will always be 'on the money'.

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Trey Chambers
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Pro-fetus does not mean pro-life, because that would indicate that they cared about life beyond the uterus, which they don't.

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Boaty McBoatface
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jmilum wrote:
Sometimes the price of Freedom is a few inconsequential women. Or something. :soblue:
Well they are slags or whores or Babylon or something (maybe secret Muslims for all I know).

Consequence free sex is the work of the devil you know?
 
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Chris R.
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Quote:
Yup. Pro-Life-- well, not women's lives anyway.


"abortion restrictions in Chile have improved maternal mortality outcomes

...the most rigorous study of its kind...

Countless public-health professionals and researchers reflexively assume that expanded access to abortion improves public-health outcomes for reproductive-age women. However, there is relatively little quality academic research that supports this assertion.

...This study also cites the decline in maternal mortality after abortion was legalized in Romania in 1989. However, the authors fail to consider that access to quality health care doubtless improved after the fall of Communism.

...First, Chile has reliable data on maternal mortality dating back until the 1950s. Second, Chile is one of the few countries that placed legal restrictions on abortion after a period of legalization.

...Poland, Malta, and Ireland, where abortion is restricted, have among the lowest maternal-mortality rates in Europe. All in all, this research provides very good evidence that access to abortion has had little to do with improved public-health outcomes for women."

http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/300129/why-chilean-mate...
 
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Donald
United States
New Alexandria
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sikeospi wrote:

...Poland, Malta, and Ireland, where abortion is restricted, have among the lowest maternal-mortality rates in Europe. All in all, this research provides very good evidence that access to abortion has had little to do with improved public-health outcomes for women."


Which has nothing to do with Texas. In Texas the push to restrict abortions has had the side effect of closing facilities that provided other health care services to women, leading to the high mortality rate.

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Christopher Dearlove
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Chelmsford
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SoRCon 8 27 Feb - 1 Mar 2015 Basildon UK http://www.sorcon.co.uk Essex Games 27 Jul '15
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sikeospi wrote:
Quote:
Yup. Pro-Life-- well, not women's lives anyway.


"abortion restrictions in Chile have improved maternal mortality outcomes

...the most rigorous study of its kind...

Countless public-health professionals and researchers reflexively assume that expanded access to abortion improves public-health outcomes for reproductive-age women. However, there is relatively little quality academic research that supports this assertion.

...This study also cites the decline in maternal mortality after abortion was legalized in Romania in 1989. However, the authors fail to consider that access to quality health care doubtless improved after the fall of Communism.

...First, Chile has reliable data on maternal mortality dating back until the 1950s. Second, Chile is one of the few countries that placed legal restrictions on abortion after a period of legalization.

...Poland, Malta, and Ireland, where abortion is restricted, have among the lowest maternal-mortality rates in Europe. All in all, this research provides very good evidence that access to abortion has had little to do with improved public-health outcomes for women."

http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/300129/why-chilean-mate...


Plenty of giveaways there that "most rigorous" means "draws conclusions I want". Maybe the conclusions are correct. Maybe they aren't. But we need experts in medicine and statistics, not (as I expected to see, and saw) from someone in "political science" to provide an assessment.

Edit: Yes, as I suspected but didn't know when I wrote the above, the author is associated with organisations (Witherspoon, Charles Lozier) that I hadn't heard of, but on checking, are where the conclusions are known before the research is done. So while the study might be good (or might not) the commentary is pretty much worthless. As it would also be from someone having made their minds up in advance in an opposite direction.
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Donald wrote:
sikeospi wrote:

...Poland, Malta, and Ireland, where abortion is restricted, have among the lowest maternal-mortality rates in Europe. All in all, this research provides very good evidence that access to abortion has had little to do with improved public-health outcomes for women."


Which has nothing to do with Texas. In Texas the push to restrict abortions has had the side effect of closing facilities that provided other health care services to women, leading to the high mortality rate.



Dude, it's sikeospi. He doesn't do facts. He doesn't understand that a number of clinics were closed that had nothing to do with abortion.

He also doesn't get simple math. If you have a money pool of $x going to prenatal care to y number of mothers and you cut to 1/3x dollars and you increase y substantially, he thinks that it's the same ratio of $ per mother. Because reasons.

To me, this has nothing to do with abortion other than a spike in birth rate that wasn't adequately planned for in Texas because they are stupid.

It's every single thing I hate about the right wing GOP Christian contingent. If you want to make abortion less accessible, then you need to grapple with the fact that you need to allocate more money to prenatal care and support of poor mothers. Of course, the last person I pointed this out to said that I was supporting baby killing, which I so loved.

Put your money where your mouth is, GOP. Or stop pretending you actually care about mothers.
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