Michael Condon
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Exceed is a two player card game that seeks to replicate the tension of two-dimensional arcade fighting games such as Street Fighter or Killer Instinct. But chances are if you’re reading this, you already knew that. The greater question becomes how this entry fares into the niche market of tabletop fighting simulators. I contend it does so brilliantly.

I may do an analysis of Exceed’s underlying systems in light of the existence of BattleCon, but not here. This analysis is for the game system proper, with only a few nods to its predecessor, as appropriate.

Components:
A box of Exceed comes with four character cards and their deck consisting of 2x copies of 8 regular moves that every character has in common, 5 special moves and 2 super moves that are unique to that character.

Each basic card has a colored symbol at the top right, and each card for a specific character has a portrait of themselves in its place to easily distinguish them from the others. The super moves and the backside (the powered up ‘Exceed’ side) of the character cards are in the shiny foil overlay.

There are currently four such boxes, each containing a different mix of 4 different characters, making the current total of fighters 16, with a few others to be purchased as stand-alone fighters. (Think DLC.)

Three things of note:
1) It would have been incredibly easy to cut costs by only putting two sets of basic cards in the box, forcing players to switch out the basic cards between characters. They didn’t do this, which I am quite thankful for.
2) It appears that LvL99 Games took to heart the outcry of one of their past BattleCon kickstarters, as the card quality is exceptional. The thickness of these cards are noticeable, and greatly appreciated.
3) These are all of the components. So there is no in-the-box system of tracking your life total as the match goes on. This has bothered some, but I’m not one of these people.

High Level Overview:
Players will have a hand of cards, and will be using these cards in a variety of ways in order to circumvent their opponents strengths, exploit their weaknesses, and grind their health to zero while protecting your own.

Strategy: With almost 50% of the cards in an Exceed deck similar across all characters, I was concerned that the differentiation between characters would not be enough to matter. Thankfully, I was very, very wrong on this. Each character has specific things they want to do to capitalize on their inherent strengths and tools at their disposal. The selection of a character will greatly inform what kind of strategy you will want to pursue, especially in light of particular opponents….

Tactics: …but as soon as the fight starts, capitalizing on your strengths and the opponents shortcomings is very much a turn-by-turn affair. Both players are going to attempt to position themselves and their opponents in such a way to swing the odds in their favor with a variety of means. ‘Position’ here does not mean only physical position, but ‘board position’ as well with a dizzying assortment of Boost effects, bluffs, counter-bluffs, opponent reads, board control--all sorts of things you would want to see in a game of this type.

A Few Game Elements: While writing analysis of a game, you tend to structure it a specific way for the flow of thought or categorization. And then there are things that don’t fit or flow better once you have background knowledge.

Mulligan: Exceed has my favorite method of mulliganing. You simply set aside the cards you do not want in your opening hand, draw that many replacement cards, then shuffle the set-aside cards back into your deck. Simple. Elegant.

Force/Gauge: There are two in-game ‘currencies’ to manage in Exceed. Each card can be discarded for one or more ‘Force’, which has a variety of uses detailed below. Additionally, after a successful Strike (damage or not) the card used to Strike is added to a separate section of the table as your Gauge—representing one of the many different type of special meters found in fighting games. Gauge can be spent to use devastating Super moves, upgrade your character to its Exceed side with additional or boosted abilities, or simply used in a pinch as Force for more mundane uses.

Card Breakdown: Like some of the most beloved games in the tabletop hobby, each card in your deck has a variety of uses. The most obvious of these is the ‘attempt to hit the other player’ Strike effect that takes up the majority of the card face. Below this is a ‘boost’ effect, which is basically a card in and of itself.

Imagine if every creature in your favorite dueling mages card game also had a spell or effect attached to the same card that you could play instead of the creature. This would give each card increased utility. Boosts are like that.

But that’s not all. Each card can also be used as ‘force’—a “currency” of a kind that will allow you to move, draw additional cards, and pay for some of the more flashy boost or other effects. The Super moves (foil, orange cards) offer two force while the regular and character specific special moves net you one. Even in this there is a wonderful valuation of each card, as you may really want to hang on to your super move because you are close to getting enough ‘Gauge’ to play it… but at the same time you need to spend some Force to get yourself into a better position, draw more relevant cards, or pay for a much needed Boost effect you need here-and-now. Opportunity costs are all over the place.

The stats on a card (be they on the Strike effect itself or the Continuous Boost effects that augment them) are as follows:
Range: The locations on the board the Strike will hit if successful, counted from your Character’s current position. Some strikes only hit directly beside you while others stretch for a few spaces, and others have specific ranges.
Power: The amount of damage the Strike will do if they hit.
Speed: How fast a Strike is to determine which Strike will activate first.
Armor: (not on all cards) The amount of damage mitigated by this Strike.
Guard: (not on all cards) The amount of damage your character can take without being Stunned.


There are two basic things one does in Exceed: Take an Action, or Strike.

Actions: Actions are important. Though they may not allow you to punch your opponent in the face—the bread-and-butter of a fighting game—they do allow you to do *something*, and afterward draw a card. This may not seem all that important, but hand-management is huge in Exceed, as any player will find out when staring down an opponent’s Strike without a relevant card in their hand.

Prepare: Draw a card, then (as this is an action) you draw another. Simple as that. An oft-used move when you’ve over-extended yourself or are fishing for more relevant options.

Move: Need to get into a specific range to use a particular attack? Need to get away from a bruiser that is beating your face in, or move beyond the minimum range of that 3+ range attack that just ruins your day that you just *know they have* because they’ve been keeping you at a distance for a while now and drawing cards like a madman? Or are you just sick of your opponent beating you into a corner or denying you of your effective ranges?

At the cost of one Force per space moved, you can dash around the board and attempt to better situate yourself.

Unlike Exceed’s big brother BattleCon, movement isn’t inextricably linked to striking the opponent. Sometime you just need to move. This may not seem important to someone without first-hand knowledge of the game, but play a grappler against a ranger and you’ll see move-and-countermove playing a big part of those games.

The best part about Move as an Action (and some Boost effects) is you cannot be Stunned out of them. While movement effects attached to Strikes may be more efficient with their chance of also hitting the opponent, you also run the risk of being Stunned out of the move altogether. With Move as an action, you are guaranteed to actually move.

Boost: The bottom portion of each card is reserved for a Boost effect. Some of these have a plus symbol showing that they will have a lingering effect (most of the time, a stat enhancement or a Before/Hit/After trigger) that stays in play until the next Strike. Others simply have an instant action that will be discarded once played.

And it seems the crafty designers have spent much of their design time making the choice between the Strike and Boost on each card as painful as possible. The utility or strength of each Boost seems tied to the utility or strength of the Strike you’d be giving up to play it. It’s quite brilliant.

Change Cards: Though there are upsides in having a randomized set of cards in a deck (such as limiting options and the Wild Swing strike option that will be discussed later), having a draw deck is always going to have a luck-of-the-draw effect in place. Some characters—especially in specific matchups—really need very specific tools at their disposal in a particular set of circumstances. And sometimes the deck just doesn’t want to cooperate.

What do you do? Spend force to draw cards! Discarding cards to draw an equal amount of cards (or more if discarding the Super moves) may not seem that exciting, but when you’re fishing for the perfect counter for the situation in front of you, you’ll be glad it exists.

I used to mulligan the Super moves without a thought if they came up in my opening hand. But as I keep playing I’ve started to weigh them as simply early-game force for card draws or movement instead. Having a card that can trade up for two options (and then draw a card at the end of this Action) or help movement can really start you on the right footing.

Reshuffle: Occasionally, you simply need the mass of cards in your discard pile to be reshuffled into your draw deck so that you can draw them again. Perhaps through process of elimination you (or worse, your opponent) has figured out you have no more relevant draws for what they have in their hand. Spending an action to refresh your options is possibly the right move. Granted, a reshuffle will be automatic once the draw deck is exhausted, but sometimes you need it earlier than that. This doesn’t happen every game, but the option is there, thankfully, and some character’s abilities or options actually get a boost from having used it.

Exceed: By spending the indicated amount of Force, you can spend an action to upgrade your Character by flipping them over to their shiny side. The utility of this will depend completely on the situation you are facing (should I wait for a chance to use my Super move, bluff like I’m about to use it to make my opponent play sub-optimally, or Exceed now while I’m in a good position?)

Exceed-ed characters usually have an enhanced version of their intrinsic skill, but by using the Gauge to activate it you are also limiting yourself by spending the Gauge that could have been used as Force or Super moves. Again, the opportunity costs and case-by-case valuations are simply delicious.

Strikes: Alternatively, you could use your turn to Strike by declaring a Strike, then you have three options.
1) Choose a card from your hand to play face-down as your Strike.
2) Choose two duplicate cards to play face-down as your Ex Strike (which has all the effects as the regular Strike, but with +1 Power, +! Speed, +1 Armor and +1 Guard.)
3) Placing the top card of your deck down on the table as a Wild Swing, and hoping for the best.

Your opponent will then do one of the above three options themselves. You then both flip your Strikes, compare Speed and Range, and go from there.

Whoever has the most Speed will go first—ties go to the one who initiated the Strike (an incredibly important factor.)

They will activate any Before effects and then see if their attack is in range.

If they are within range, they will apply any Hit effects and do damage based on the Power of their Strike minus any Armor the opponent may have, reducing their opponents life total by that much.

They then perform any After effects. If the opponent was hit (damage or not), the card they used to Strike with is added to their Gauge.

The opponent will then go through this same process, but only if their combined Armor and Guard were equal to or greater than the damage taken that turn. If not, the attack Stunned them, and they do not get to do any of this.

Striking-As-Design: Some attacks are by design faster or more mobile, but less ‘safe’ as they do not have the Guard to be able to retaliate if they are hit. Same goes for ranged attacks that rely on sheer distance as their defense. Other attacks are slower, more powerful, and can take a bit of punishment through high Guard/Armor. There are many different levers here.

As a mechanic, Wild Swing is interesting and exciting. As having cards in hand as options are important, sometimes you just need to Wild Swing and hope for the best—especially if your opponent initiated the strike and you have no relevant options. Why waste a card that you *know* does nothing in this situation when you might end up with a Hail Mary? Remember, it *is* a free card draw, even if it has semi-random effectiveness.

And when you DO succeed in Wild Swinging into that *perfect* counter to your opponent’s move… it’s just delicious. Of course being on the receiving end of that can really make you grit your teeth in frustration. The tension it produces and rare-but-hilarious situations that can come out of it is phenomenal.

And it’s not as if you have NO IDEA what you may be Wild Swinging into. Having 2x copies of 15 cards in your deck where you know what you have in hand/discard/Gauge… you can play the odds, as you will be doing with your opponent the whole time as well when you’re hoping one of those *four measly cards* isn’t that ONE thing that could ruin EVERYTHING and he’s already used ONE and he only has 12-ish cards left in his deck so it MIGHT be safe and DANG IT HE WAS HOLDING IT THE WHOLE TIME!

Tension.

You couldn’t have a mechanic like this without the inherent randomness of the deck. While I would concede that perfect information may make for an objectively “better game”, there are enough ways to mitigate it to make the normal frustrations of card drawing simply not much of a factor, and mechanics like Wild Swing do better represent those panic moments in fighting games, and are simply, in my experience, more fun in the aggregate, leading to a better game *experience*. And that *is* why we play games, right? (Right?)

One thing I’ve noticed is that Striking is inherently better than counter-Striking in most situations, as the initiator of the Strike having the ability to break ties in speed is absolutely integral. There have been dozens of strikes where I thought I was in the clear by choosing a Speed 5 or 6 card, only to be met with a Speed 5 or 6 card and whiffing completely (as it is rare that a card has speed 5/6 with Guard/Armor.) This realization made me really evaluate which cards are better as the Striker or the counter-Striker.

Basic Cards:
Sweep: The card by which all cards are measured. It’s slow, almost impossible to stun out of, has good range, and hits like a truck. When picking cards, you really have to figure if trading with a Sweep is worth it, or calculate if they even have Sweep as an option.

Boost: Light: …or it can be one of the best hit confirm Boosts in the game by giving +2 speed to your next Strike. Holding Sweep as the best retaliation card vs the best hit confirm Boost is a decision that will probably have to be made multiple times-per-game, and will depend greatly on the matchup, board state and available options in any given turn.

Grasp: An incredibly fast move that does mild damage but with the ability to throw opponents. Maybe you want to throw them in the corner, maybe you want to throw them so you’re out of range of their current chosen Strike that 3 damage doesn’t stun them out of, or maybe you just need a quick move that will stun them at range 1. There are few cards that can out Speed this one, so chances are high you will be making this decision in light of the Strike your opponent has chosen.

Boost: Fierce: …or you can make sure your next Strike packs a punch with +2 Power, increasing the chance it stuns the opponent. Make fast, light hitting punches something to be feared or leaden hard-hitting punches with even more wholloping power.

Assault: A mid-to-fast attack that allows you to close 2 spaces, and gain Advantage (being able to take the next turn no matter who initiated the Strike) if it hits. Moderate damage and a great way to set up combos. This is also a good way to mess with your opponent’s head when you’re a ranged character and they keep trying to get in your range (or their best range). Change up the game by pushing forward instead of backing off yet again, gain advantage and back up NEXT time in a game of footsy.

Boost: Backstep: …or maybe your character (or the situation) doesn’t warrant being so confrontational. Being able to retreat 4 (or as much as possible) when you’re trying to stop a freight train of a bruiser or to get in your optimal range gives you room to breathe.

Cross: A really great counter card. A fast, quick hit that allows you to move backward after a hit, hopefully out of range of whatever you have not stunned them out of. If your opponent doesn’t choose a Speed 6 card or Grasp at range 1 while initiating a Strike, this is a great way to set yourself up for a ranged hit on your next turn if you have one available, (or to simply bide your time by doing an Action instead while you have the time and breathing room to do so.)

Boost: Run: …or you can simply discard it to advance 3 Spaces. Notice this isn’t ‘Close 3 spaces’ so where you are relative to your opponent will change this Boost’s utility. You may need to close the distance for that jerk who keeps backing up into artillery range, or maybe you just need a quick way to get out of the corner.

Dive: Dive is, at least for me, a highly situational toolbox. At Speed 4 with no protection it is incredibly easy to be stunned out of. But being able to advance 3 and, if switching places with the opponent, be immune that turn has great uses against slower hard-hitting Strikes. And of course if this Advance 3 puts you directly behind your opponent, they are going to take 5 damage to the back of the head. But if you are at a great distance and need to close it, and the opponent has no quicker ranged hits to stun you out of this, it’s way to move 3 closer with the chance to drop an elbow on them.

Boost: Tech: …then, of course, there’s the OTHER situational card of being able to simply discard an annoying Boost in play. This is a great tradeoff (to your opponent’s never-ending frustration) if they’ve paid 2-4 Force for an incredibly strong Boost and you play Tech… sucks the wind right out of their sails. But of course they will be trying to evaluate if you have this card at your disposal prior to committing so many resources into it… and you’ll have to figure how badly you want to hold on to this option if you know there’s a Boost in your opponent’s deck that will make them a force to be reckoned with.

Spike: Spike is a hard hitting attack—not just in damage, but also hits so hard as to ignore the opponents Armor and Guard. It can’t hit at range 1, however, and very slow. It’s vanilla form is the perfect counter to a slow jackhammer hit from the opponent, but when you increase it’s speed with some Boosts then it competes with quite a bit. Guard 4 also makes it a very competent option for a retaliation against quicker strikes as well—so long as they don’t duck into your minimum range.

Boost: Defend: …or, instead of knocking through defenses, you can mount them with +1 Armor and +3 Guard, giving you some insurance that your next Strike will not be stunned out. The opponent will have to do 4 extra damage to have the same stun potential over whatever choice you make, which will make you easier to avoid than to stun if they want to shut down your Strike.

Focus: Focus is another toolbox, but with more average utility. It hits for decent damage, is really safe with its two Armor and 5 Guard and slow as they come. But it’s real benefit is that it prevent the opponent from moving you and if you hit you get to draw a card. Any one of these things has situational uses: you’re in a prime position or don’t want to be Grasped into a corner, you want to maintain card advantage and your opponent keeps Striking when you’re not ready, you believe they’re about to Sweep, expecting a rather large hit incoming. It’s more of a reactive or defensive card by nature, but I’ve also found it makes for a good one-two punch after gaining Advantage after an Assault.

Boost: Reading: …or maybe you want to play the denial game by forcing them to discard a Normal attack and having them Strike without it. If you are at range 4 or greater and have a Strike prepared, force them to use a Grasp or Sweep to get that nonsense out of their hand. Even if you whiff completely you get to look at their hand and know exactly what their options are for that Strike (and potentially many Strikes to come if they had much in their hand.) Reading is by nature situational, but it is a Boost I’m really growing to appreciate.

Block: And lastly we come to the not-so-flashy but –ever-so-important card Block. Block has a natural Armor 2, but allows you to discard Force for extra Armor as well which, given your available resources, gives the potential to completely negate whole attacks. And afterwards you get to add it to your Gauge if not stunned (as it has no hit potential this is the only way it could manage that.) If you’re stuck Gauge and cannot manage to get that one extra you need for a super move or to flip to your Exceed side, Block is a safe way to gain that resource. Another thing I found useful on occasion is to initiate a strike WITH a Block, feigning aggression to have the opponent bleed themselves of one of their more tasty options. Or if you’re low on life and the opponent has you on the ropes, Block may be an absolute godsend to get you out of a nasty situation.

Boost: Parry: …or maybe you need a more preemptive, selective form of blocking. Unlike Reading, a Boost confined to selecting Normal attacks and then having your opponent Strike with them if they so happen to have it, Parry allows you to choose *any* card your opponent may have and to have them discard it. The bonus of information is the same across both of them, as you get to look at their hand if they do not happen to have it, but Parry is a strict Action, which means you’ll get to draw a card as well. And being able to select their unique moves to potentially rob them of has all sorts of potential depending on which move has the means of causing you the most headaches.


The Feel: All this ties together in a game that very much does feel like playing a competitive 2D fighting game. It’s not just the coat of paint over the mechanics here as it might be elsewhere. Striking a bunch of times and exhausting your options really does have the same atmosphere of having rushed your opponent hand had them block your every move, leaving you open after your flurry of activity. Moving in and out of position does feel more natural, like playing a ground game with your opponent, whose options you may not 100% know. Being able to turn things around by panicking and hitting buttons ala Wild Swing can give that sense of elation when it does end up working against all odds. And the comebacks and clinch moments have the same level of excitement when you’ve finally bested your opponent at that critical moment when all seemed lost.

Final Analysis: With everything in life subject to the individual, mileage may vary. But as for me, this is one of the best, smoothest, most fun games I’ve played in years—perhaps ever. It’s sleek, elegant, innovative in its own way, feels familiar to its intended motif while bringing something new to the table top hobby. Some may prefer more perfect information games ala BattleCon which they already love and own, and this is fine. There’s always the opportunity cost of one’s time and money to consider. But to simply dismiss Exceed outright without having played a couple games of it to feel the ‘hum of the engine’, so to speak, would be robbing themselves of something magnificent. Solid, solid game. 9.5/10.

‘But wait…’ you may be saying. ‘You’ve been praising this game like crazy for four solid pages! Why not a ‘10’?
Here’s the thing—I realize this is more of a ‘me’ thing than anything else, but with any game with selections such as this, be they characters, factions, etc, I can’t help but feel like ALL choices should be competitive. This is not to say that any of the characters are intrinsically broken or un-fun, but it is something that nags at me when it comes to (to keep with the theme) fighting game ‘tier’ lists of characters. I always wonder if, for example, E.Honda never makes it as a chosen character in EVO, or Dhalsim is so universally reviled (mechanically, not ‘as’ a character), then why do they keep putting them in games? Why do they not tweak the damage, speed, hit confirm, give them more relevant tools or any such thing to make them more on an even playing field with the 25% of characters we see ALL THE TIME. They aren’t Dan—they aren’t made to be weak ‘on purpose.’ Simple maybe, but not weak.

This is, of course, a personal thing, and as a fighting game the fact that some of these characters seem to be bananas and others seem to always lag behind them, it fits the theme. MOST of these characters are highly, highly competitive (MUCH more than their mentioned video game counterparts), but it is what is keeping it for being PERFECT for me.

And that is what a 10 means to me… little to no room for improvement. This game is a shining star of design, elegance and fun, and has in short order cemented itself into my personal top 10 games I’ve ever played across *any* medium, but I could not defend it as a ten.

Final Word: And there you go, a full long-form analysis and I didn't even have to stoop to using Exceed as a pun. Get it.
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Joshua Christensen
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Cool write up. I haven't played the game a whole lot yet so I'm curious about what you think the tier list for this game looks like. If you don't have a full on tier list in mind who do you think are the bananas characters and who are the weaker ones?
 
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Michael Condon
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The character that (for us, small group) has the highest win expectation is Heidi by far.

Some have been real close, Alice, Gabrek and Zoey, but nothing I'd call 'intrinsically unfair'. I'd consider these currently our first tier characters.

The bottom tier is pretty solid though: Eva, Satoshi, Mei Lien and Baelkhor, with Baelkhor having not won a match yet. (He is the most different.) I use these when playing against someone unfamiliar with the game.

That isn't to say that these characters are horrible or unfun to play--and that doesn't mean you won't have fun (or better luck than us) going against the first tier-ers. And I think that's the most important thing: having fun. My gripes with tiers are just me in general. As you can see, I haven't exactly stomped on the game in my glowing analysis.
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Alex H
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Great analysis, I especially enjoyed the section where you detail the advantages of all the boosts. As a Vincent player, I really value the "look at the opponent's hand" effects.

My question is, which boxes do you own? And are you going to post your analysis to every Exceed page (which you should.) I've only played Red Horizon, so are all the other boxes more complex than that?

Also, do you have any tips for playing as Nehtali? I seem to always lose against Reese or Heidi. I'm not really sure what Nehtali's game plan is... beside trying to land with an early Super.
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Michael Condon
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alexhong96 wrote:
Great analysis, I especially enjoyed the section where you detail the advantages of all the boosts. As a Vincent player, I really value the "look at the opponent's hand" effects.

My question is, which boxes do you own? And are you going to post your analysis to every Exceed page (which you should.) I've only played Red Horizon, so are all the other boxes more complex than that?

Also, do you have any tips for playing as Nehtali? I seem to always lose against Reese or Heidi. I'm not really sure what Nehtali's game plan is... beside trying to land with an early Super.


I had the same thing with Vincent as well. He was a character I really wanted to make work because I'm so fascinated with him.

I currently own everything the game currently has to offer, including the two 'sneak peek' characters. I'm not sure I know what you mean by the 'I've only played Red Horizon' comment, as (aside from the sneak peek characters) all the current characters are Red Horizon characters.

I had trouble with Nethali at the beginning too, but I've learned that she is much more of a patience fighter than I originally gave her credit for. She only wants to selectively use her special ability to help 'top off' gauges depending on whether she is more interested in Azael's Torment/Heaven's Punishment or Soul Thresher/Hellfire. Her Exceed ability comes out maybe 40% of the time due to the investment involved, but is still useful so long as the pressure isn't on.

Of course, if only one of the two of you have any amount of Gauge, they may be able to read which moves you're attempting to set up if you know the character. But there have been more than enough games with her with her keep-away game that both of you have more than enough to make any options viable.

You see, most characters that excel at range only have that to worry about--range. Range limits their options. With Nethali, not only does range limit her options ,but either side's Gauge does as well. This pushes her into being much more selective and patient, waiting for the right opportunities and working on defense and setup/position until such a time presents itself (such as when your opponent is running low on cards--a really dangerous proposition against such a character.)

With more rush-down characters, her Boosts give them fits. Divine Harvester, Begone! and Clutch of Evil all have movement effects to get people out of your face and bide your time. Swift Destruction is one of the best speed boosts in the game (though you have to pay for it.) And pushing them into range 4 and then using Darkness Barrier is always a plus--especially if you made them play a sub-optimal move with Parry (such as that Sweep you just *know* they're holding). (Though if you cannot Parry them or fail to do so and their Strike has *any* movement effect... it's still a Speed 1 card.) Finding a way to circumvent this by pushing them SO FAR that they dash directly into Darkness Barrier works too.

Soul Thresher, to me, is a standout card. It hits SO FAST and SO FAR that it can be used both as a Gauge-dump finisher (I've done upwards of 14 before) or a quick plan-ruining stunner. It's really up to the situation, but having a card that can do both is really integral.

Hell's Salvation is a twofold threat--firstly it keeps people out of range 2 if you have 5 Gauge, or you can just simply set the thing up artificially by pushing them. Speed 7 and 12 Power is nothing to balk at.

Heaven's Punishment is much, oddly, more situational because it's completely dependent upon your opponents Gauge, which you only have a small amount of control over, and even when optimal may need a speed boost to help it along.

Nethali's standout Normals: Things that help her stall, such as Focus and Block, Cross and a boosted Dive for escape potential, and the occasional Grasp for setups, escapes and position effects.

Now... as for Heidi... she's a beast so I'm not totally sure

As far as re-posting in the other pages: It's been my understanding that with games that come with a bunch of pages and expansions, one tends to be the default main page for the game system. With Summoner Wars, Heroscape and Warhammer Conquest (as three examples I've dealt with off the top of my head), this was easy to determine as they each had a 'master set' at some point that kind of took over. The release structure of Exceed doesn't seem to allow for that, but this box seems to be considered the 'first', so it appears to have asserted itself as the main place people go for forums on Exceed in general.
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Aaron White
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I find it very promising that everyone has different experiences with who is stronger or weaker. Your list is the other way around for me, with Baelkhor, Satoshi and Eva really high. I am putting this to personal play styles, some characters mesh with a player and others don't.

I love this, makes a game effort feel personal like you are making your mark.
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Joshua Christensen
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roufus wrote:

Soul Thresher, to me, is a standout card. It hits SO FAST and SO FAR that it can be used both as a Gauge-dump finisher (I've done upwards of 14 before) or a quick plan-ruining stunner. It's really up to the situation, but having a card that can do both is really integral.


Can Soul Thresher's effect be triggered multiple times? The way I'm reading it, it can only be triggered once. Making the card's purpose being only a quick stunner. If the effect can be paid for multiple times then she essentially has 3 ultimate moves.

Edit: In fact if she can pay for the effect multiple times it is way better then most ultimates. It especially makes Hell's Salvation look pretty lame. At 5 gauge Soul Thresher would deal 2 less damage but has ridiculous hit confirm to make up for that. The draw back of the high damage supers is they typically target one space but Soul Thresher targets the whole board. I'd be very scared of this card if it was ruled that it could be paid for multiple times. At that point every boost that can gain gauge would be used as such to power up a 16+ damage Soul Thresher. And it gets even better because if the opponent manages to some how stun it out you don't lose any gauge can can just try again.
 
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Rook96 wrote:
I find it very promising that everyone has different experiences with who is stronger or weaker. Your list is the other way around for me, with Baelkhor, Satoshi and Eva really high. I am putting this to personal play styles, some characters mesh with a player and others don't.

I love this, makes a game effort feel personal like you are making your mark.


Maybe we can set up a game through email or skype sometime to try the different styles/inverted tiers against one another.
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roufus wrote:
Rook96 wrote:
I find it very promising that everyone has different experiences with who is stronger or weaker. Your list is the other way around for me, with Baelkhor, Satoshi and Eva really high. I am putting this to personal play styles, some characters mesh with a player and others don't.

I love this, makes a game effort feel personal like you are making your mark.


Maybe we can set up a game through email or skype sometime to try the different styles/inverted tiers against one another.


I'd be interested in playing by Skype some time. I've been trying to get in more games of Exceed but unfortunately Thursday is the only day my gaming opponent has available.
 
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ClanNatioy wrote:
roufus wrote:

Soul Thresher, to me, is a standout card. It hits SO FAST and SO FAR that it can be used both as a Gauge-dump finisher (I've done upwards of 14 before) or a quick plan-ruining stunner. It's really up to the situation, but having a card that can do both is really integral.


Can Soul Thresher's effect be triggered multiple times? The way I'm reading it, it can only be triggered once. Making the card's purpose being only a quick stunner. If the effect can be paid for multiple times then she essentially has 3 ultimate moves.


I went back and reread it and... I see what you're saying. I'm not sure if that's the intent or not, but a printed power of 0 made me just read it as something you can dump into. Can you even stun someone with zero power?

Since gauge is so integral to so many of her options, it's a risk to burn through them for anything but a huge swing, but that doesnt seem to warrant an almost full board 7 speed thing like that. Perhaps we need a ruling.
 
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roufus wrote:
ClanNatioy wrote:
roufus wrote:

Soul Thresher, to me, is a standout card. It hits SO FAST and SO FAR that it can be used both as a Gauge-dump finisher (I've done upwards of 14 before) or a quick plan-ruining stunner. It's really up to the situation, but having a card that can do both is really integral.


Can Soul Thresher's effect be triggered multiple times? The way I'm reading it, it can only be triggered once. Making the card's purpose being only a quick stunner. If the effect can be paid for multiple times then she essentially has 3 ultimate moves.


I went back and reread it and... I see what you're saying. I'm not sure if that's the intent or not, but a printed power of 0 made me just read it as something you can dump into. Can you even stun someone with zero power?

Since gauge is so integral to so many of her options, it's a risk to burn through them for anything but a huge swing, but that doesnt seem to warrant an almost full board 7 speed thing like that. Perhaps we need a ruling.


I edited my quoted post to say if Soul Thresher can be dumped into it just becomes way too good and out shines her other ultimates.

So how I see this card is it something you play when you think they're played some speed 6 move that doesn't have any stun guard. If they do you pay the gauge stun them and then get that gauge back. Or maybe they're at a distance where Dive is a thing so you play it to stun them out of their Dive. If they play something with Armor then you just don't pay the gauge. The card would still go to your gauge though because you hit them.

Seems like a very useful card vs long range fighters because the ones that I've seen don't have any stun guard on their longer range attacks.
 
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ClanNatioy wrote:
roufus wrote:
ClanNatioy wrote:
roufus wrote:

Soul Thresher, to me, is a standout card. It hits SO FAST and SO FAR that it can be used both as a Gauge-dump finisher (I've done upwards of 14 before) or a quick plan-ruining stunner. It's really up to the situation, but having a card that can do both is really integral.


Can Soul Thresher's effect be triggered multiple times? The way I'm reading it, it can only be triggered once. Making the card's purpose being only a quick stunner. If the effect can be paid for multiple times then she essentially has 3 ultimate moves.


I went back and reread it and... I see what you're saying. I'm not sure if that's the intent or not, but a printed power of 0 made me just read it as something you can dump into. Can you even stun someone with zero power?

Since gauge is so integral to so many of her options, it's a risk to burn through them for anything but a huge swing, but that doesnt seem to warrant an almost full board 7 speed thing like that. Perhaps we need a ruling.


I edited my quoted post to say if Soul Thresher can be dumped into it just becomes way too good and out shines her other ultimates.

So how I see this card is it something you play when you think they're played some speed 6 move that doesn't have any stun guard. If they do you pay the gauge stun them and then get that gauge back. Or maybe they're at a distance where Dive is a thing so you play it to stun them out of their Dive. If they play something with Armor then you just don't pay the gauge. The cared would still go to your gauge though because you hit them.

Seems like a very useful card vs long range fighters because the ones that I've seen don't have any stun guard on their longer range attacks.


No, I understand. It was a thoughtless assumption on my part due to other games with 0 damage dump boost effects. I can almost guarantee i wouldnt have read it that way if its printed power was one.

But most of the time i was using it as only 2 gauge dump anyway. The 14 damage one was a one time thing. Looks like I owe someone a rematch.
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