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Subject: Some rule questions rss

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Nick Bos
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Hi!

I think I have these things correctly, but wanted to make sure.

- Any capsule, even without astronauts, can test for life support right? Does that mean that 1) I could launch one capsule into orbit and get rid of the testing cards during the next three turns?; 2) I could put multiple capsules on one rocket to test 3 times in a row during one turn?

- Can I fly to the moon and back in one turn? If so, if that capsule lands. Can I then immediately put more rockets on it and fire it again if I would wish? I think it's yes in both cases, but again, just trying to make sure.

Thanks a lot for your time!


 
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Larry L
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Faerun wrote:
Hi!

I think I have these things correctly, but wanted to make sure.

- Any capsule, even without astronauts, can test for life support right? Does that mean that 1) I could launch one capsule into orbit and get rid of the testing cards during the next three turns?; 2) I could put multiple capsules on one rocket to test 3 times in a row during one turn?

- Can I fly to the moon and back in one turn? If so, if that capsule lands. Can I then immediately put more rockets on it and fire it again if I would wish? I think it's yes in both cases, but again, just trying to make sure.

Thanks a lot for your time!




Yes to all but there is a subtle distinction between year and turn (which rarely matters in solitaire games.) Life support is tested at the end of the year.
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Will H.
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Are you sure you can test life support w/o an astronaut?

Can you find a citation in the rule book? (Just curious...)
 
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Jakub Glazik
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gar0u wrote:
Are you sure you can test life support w/o an astronaut?
Can you find a citation in the rule book? (Just curious...)

That's correct. Page 15, Off-Earth survival:

Quote:
2. Each agency draws an outcome card from its Life Support advancement for each undamaged capsule that agency has in space to see if life support works (even for unmanned capsules). (...)

What other way could you test capsule life support system?
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Roger BW
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rzabcio wrote:
What other way could you test capsule life support system?
Conceptually, it seems that one could seal up the capsule on Earth (with astronauts inside it, even) and see how well it worked - opening the hatch if things went wrong.

But as usual with LE we assume that that sort of test has been done already as far as it can be, and what's left for the outcome cards is what can only be found out in the actual zero-G environment.
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Jakub Glazik
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Firedrake wrote:
Conceptually, it seems that one could seal up the capsule on Earth (with astronauts inside it, even) and see how well it worked - opening the hatch if things went wrong.
Yaah, I have seen exactly the same argument about need of testing ion thrusters in Space: "why do we need to test them there, they were tested on the ground already!".

Sorry, but this is just wrong.

You cannot reproduce exactly the same conditions (for example because of Earth's gravitational well), so such test would not include all boundary values. Leaving Earth assumes tests on the ground have been done already. Tests we make are additional field-tests in final environment.
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Greg Maynard
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rzabcio wrote:
Firedrake wrote:
Conceptually, it seems that one could seal up the capsule on Earth (with astronauts inside it, even) and see how well it worked - opening the hatch if things went wrong.
Yaah, I have seen exactly the same argument about need of testing ion thrusters in Space: "why do we need to test them there, they were tested on the ground already!".

Sorry, but this is just wrong.

You cannot reproduce exactly the same conditions (for example because of Earth's gravitational well), so such test would not include all boundary values. Leaving Earth assumes tests on the ground have been done already. Tests we make are additional field-tests in final environment.

We have seen this in real life with the Apollo 1 fire where three astronauts died during a ground test. The capsule was designed to use a pure oxygen environment of 5 pounds per square inch. However 5 psi in the vacuum of space was equivalent to 16 psi at sea level. This was what made the oxygen content so volatile and explosive.

The results may be the reverse of the situation being discussed here but the overall is the same - you cannot completely replicate a space environment on earth and hence equipment will not be fully tested until flown.
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