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Subject: Covert - A board game review by The King of Meeples rss

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Asaf Fabbi
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The Tweet
Covert felt like the actual Cold War with dice and better art.

The Story

"Control your network of spies, gather intel, and break codes in Covert, a game of tactical dice placement, set collection, and timing set in Cold War Europe. Players race to complete high risk Missions by deploying their agents and acquiring the necessary equipment, all while keeping an eye on the needs of future missions and the advances of rival agencies."

-Excerpt from Summary in BGG

The Preamble
Do you miss The Cold War? The good old days of tension between two super powers with enough nuclear firepower to destroy the world several times over (but which you could live through if you duck and covered under your school desk). Or perhaps you've just finished playing Fallout 4 and binged all the seasons of the Americans and just need a good espionage thriller. Whatever the case, Covert is the game for you if you are looking to play a game set in The Cold War where you play one of several intelligence agencies maneuvering your agents into place in the European theatre to collect evidence, achieve missions, and break codes in order to maintain the stalemate which is the only alternative to mutually assured destruction. Stay frosty, roll some dice, and try not to poop too much intel.

The Breakdown

Components and Gameplay

Player Screens
These four player screens are tinted in the four colors of the players (Red, Blue, Green, Yellow) and are used to conceal cipher goal cards, mission cards, and Special Operations Tokens.

They also have a nice reference showing iconography keys to some of the cards:


As well as brief descriptions of the special operations tokens:

Finally, they have a nice little thematic touch with pigpen cipher codes written on each. I believe they translate literally into the player colors. e.g., the excerpt picture below is "red" for the red player screen and so on.

The main board
The Covert board is well designed. The regions are color coded and use iconography to assist the color blind in locating mission destinations. Another nice thematic touch is the blue string connecting each destination in Europe like it was a giant evidence wall with cities instead of thumb tacks holding everything together.

Your intelligence agency will move special operatives along these strings to accomplish missions.
Spy Meeples!

Intel Cubes
As your spy meeples move around the European theatre, they leave cube shaped poop along the way that, when other agents move into and pick up, eventually allows them to draw more agency cards (two of a like color intel = 1 new card).

Agency Cards
Players use agency cards to complete missions or special operations. Each agency card has three traits: Spy equipment (large gun, lock pick, etc in the center if the card), a destination country, a special ops ability in the bottom left. Players can use an agency card as one of these traits. The location can be used to fly a agent to that destination (ala Pandemic style) instantly. The equipment trait can be used to help meet one of a players hidden mission cards from behind their screen. These are both actions that have to be taken on a players turn and only if they have drafted it (more on that later). The third trait, special ops, is a free action a player can take in addition to their normal actions on a given turn. The handy player screen has corresponding descriptions for each special ops ability and also a good "icon translator" for equipment because binoculars and lock picks on agency cards do not look the same as the mission card requirement icons for binoculars and lock picks

The main board breaks down into four other distinct segments that are important to understand:
Actions
The central mechanic in this game is the action drafting. There are four possible actions to draft:
1 Move agents
Allows a player to move each of their agents one movement space per die. So, one die means a player may move all three of their agents 1 space each. No, not one agent three spaces. Each agent, optionally, up to one space. 2 dice means each agent can move up to two spaces on the board and so on.
2 Draw Agency/Agent cards
Each die placed on this action space allows a player to draw an agency card from the flopped agency cards that are in the same region as one of their spy meeples. Alternatively, they can use two dice to draw a agency card from any region or from the top of the deck blind.
3 Draw Mission cards
Each die allows player to draw a mission card from the deck blind or from the flop of currently revealed public mission cards.
4 Accomplish Mission
Each die allows a player to accomplish one of the missions they have drawn into their hand.

Mission Cards
Each player starts the game with 2 mission cards they chose from three that were initially dealt to them. Additional mission cards can be drawn from a flop of three face up or one face down from the deck through the appropriate action. Players are only allowed a maximum hand size of 3 mission cards. Mission cards have a certain combination of criteria that need to be met to be accomplished such as a type of equipment, a discarded agency card, having a agent in a certain region or specific city within a certain region and so on. Achieved missions are worth a number of victory points depicted on the top right corner of the card in white numbers. Mission cards also represent the game clock. Once a player accomplishes their 6th mission, the end game sequence is triggered. During the end game sequence, the round is finished and then each player gets one more chance to achieve another mission. Then the game ends and victory points on evidence and completed missions is summed to determine the winner.

Character Cards
Whenever a player completes a mission card they tuck it underneath their special character card. Sometimes, accomplished missions have an icon that is shown and as a result it counts as whatever that icon is for the purposes of accomplishing other missions. In this way, achieving missions makes it easier to achieve more missions. Special character cards also each give a player a unique asymmetrical ability that no one else has.

Dice
During the first phase of a round, all players role their 5 d6s, arrange them in publicly visible and sequential order, and then take turns placing their dice onto the boards actions section. When placing dice on these actions, players are only allowed to place dice next to other dice. So, if a player puts a #1 onto an action that means they their opponents can only place on the 1 or the 6 space for that action if they want to take it. Thus, action drafting quickly also becomes action blocking as players determine who has what possible combination of numbers and time drafting their actions accordingly.

Re-Roll Tokens
Players each have one re-roll token they can use once per game to re-roll any number of their dice once on a turn.

Agent Card Draft Flop:
Six agency cards are flopped face up under each of the six color coded and icon distinct sections that correspond to their identical regions on the board. This is relevant because a player can only draw an agency card from the flop if they have a spy in the same region as that card is located or if they pick up their second intel cube from that region or if they exchange two dice from the draw agent card action to allow them to draw whatever they want.

Special Operations
Instead of placing a die onto an available action, a player can place a die onto the Special Operations section of the board. Unlike action sections, there are no formal rules restricting placement onto the special ops section. A player can place any number of like numbered dice (one at a time each turn) in any order onto the folder and there is not limit to the number or type of dice placed.

Each time a player places a die onto the special ops section they draw a special ops token from the cool brown special ops bag. This token does one of the things described for its icon on the player aid screens. Tokens are free actions that can be used when appropriate.
Special Ops Tokens and Bag

Finally, players are allowed to place dice onto the Cipher section of the board or to choose to pass at any time.
Turn Order Tokens
After each player passes in the first phase they take the lowest remaining turn order counter. This turn counter determines who goes first in the second and third phases.

Then, once everyone has passed they begin the second phase which is the code breaking phase. Each player, in turn order is allowed to swap two orthogonally adjacent cipher tiles on the cipher section of the board. It is important to note that "adjacent" tiles are orthogonal both horizontally and vertically and that tiles on the farthest ends of the cipher "wrap" and are also considered adjacent for swapping but not for breaking a code.
Cipher

Cipher Tokens

If a player played any of their dice onto the cipher section of the board during phase 1, they may place that die onto a cipher tile to change the face value from the one depicted to that of the die being placed on it.
Equipment/Code Cards
If after the swap and placement of any dice one two numbers read from left to right the code depicted behind the players player screen they "crack" that code. This results in them flipping the code card from the side with the three digit code facing up to the side showing a piece of equipment and a point value of 2. The player can only ever break a maximum of 2 codes on their turn. After they resolve code breaks, they remove their dice and replace their code cards from one of the two decks of code card decks (which are placed equipment side up). These cards can be used to meet the requirements of a mission card or kept until the end of the game. If they are kept until the end of the game they are worth 2 victory points each (broken codes not cards that are code side face up).


The Review

The Good

thumbsup Excellent rule book with great quick review references and visual examples. The designers did a great job of peppering the book with white boxes that summarized the rules for a quick reference when playing. It was handy and I would like to see more rule books adopt this method. There were also plenty of visual examples which further made the rules more easy to digest.

thumbsup Great Design. There are just a lot of nice design choices threaded throughout the game like the clue plot blue string criss crossing the european board, the pig pen cipher codes on the player screens, the spy shaped meeples, and the fact that part of the game involves breaking codes. Renegade did a good job of aligning the look of the game to the theme of the game.
thumbsup Color coded and icon reinforced board regions. These were good choices which reduce friction of searching for your destination to complete a mission. Not everyone intuitively knows where Milan is and others may be color blind so kudos to this illustration.
thumbsup Tense complex play with multiple paths to victory. You can try to solve missions through travel or break lots of codes. You can move around a lot to gather dropped intel from other agents allowing you to draw more agency cards without actually taking the draw action and thus increasing the efficiency of your play. You can pay careful attention to your blocking game and deny other players actions in net which gives you an inherent advantage and so on. In considering your options you will find that players are pretty quiet with their "heads down" trying to figure out all the variables of play. For some, this brain burner aspect to the game may be very rewarding. It also serves as an appropriate mood for a game set in the Cold War.
thumbsup I liked that there were special character cards with unique abilities. They helped introduce just a little bit of asymmetry into the game and serve to give players a little bit of focus as to what sort of strategy they can utilize most effectively. For instance, one agent has the ability to swap twice during the cipher phase while another allows a player to take extra and free movement allowing them to be better at collecting intel.

The Bad

thumbsdown Production issues. The wooden components suffered from color transference. My guess would be that the paint was still wet when they were put in the box so they stuck together. I had to pull several pieces apart and as a result many cubes and spies coloring is pretty speckled with different colors.

thumbsdown Icon confusion. The player screens needed to have "translations" of the icons for the pictures on the agency and equipment cards to the icon requirements on the mission cards. e.g., the lock picks icon look really different on the mission card than they do on the equipment and agency cards. Personally, I found this added a little friction to the game play as players had to double check icons a lot more and in some cases even made mistakes because they thought they had a icon they didn't etc.
thumbsdown Artistic editing fails. I don't know if they had a art director/editing but there were some things that simply slipped by whoever reviewed the artistic choices made by the designers. One specific example would be the "credentials" art which shows a chip credit card. As this was the cold war, and this was in a period before the modern invention of chip cards, it caused a "hiccup" in the continuity of the game theme. e.g., it'd be like having a iPhone card in a game set in feudal Japan. Made no sense. Another example would be the inversion of the colors of some of the icons related to regions. So, for instance, the yellow region has a yellow dot in a white circle but the corresponding card icon has a white dot in a yellow circle. Same for the grey arrow. This would seem rather minor but when you tuck the icon under the player character card and it is meant to indicate what region your character can always use to accomplish a mission, it can lead to some confusion and further friction of game play.
thumbsdown Player screens missing basic game flow structure. the player screens did a good job of showing special ops token powers and translating icons but they have no reference to game phases and basic turn structure. This would have been a good thing to have and I consider it a basic attribute of a player aid.

thumbsdown Limited player interaction. The game felt like a more traditional euro in that most of the player interaction was through blocking and indirect gathering of intel left by other players. Now this is not a inherently "bad" thing to some but I don't typically consider it a plus as a trait in a game.

The Ugly (Things I would fix)

trade Reduced friction by aligning icons. I would have chosen one consistent set of icons. Then used the space that created on the player screens where they map out what each icon means with sequence of play for players as a reference. Also, I would have made the icons on the cards for region consistent with the region icons on the board. No inverted yellow dots!

trade Production. I got over the production issues relatively quickly as they ultimately appeared to be minor nuisances but I imagine many people will find this to be a bigger deal. I would implore renegade if it isn't to late (which I imagine unfortunately it is) to investigate further to see if this is a fluke or a larger problem so they can get ahead of the inevitable wave of customer complaints about component quality.

trade Replace the chip credit card with something like a fake passport. It'd just help with the theme's continuity.

My Conclusion
Covert does a really good job at feeling like a tense series of exchanges based on careful calculation and thought. While you are never directly interacting with your opponents, you are doing so in a oblique sense. You block their plays, collect their intel to advance your own agenda, break a code that also messes up their own attempt to break theirs, and so on. In this way the game certainly accomplishes its theme where we are all in the cold war and direct confrontation would mean mutually assured destruction. However, at times this reduced heat also cools interactions amongst players as well. I found that it was difficult to really socialize with everyone while playing this game because everyone was so focused on their internal calculations. That being said, as far as euros go, I like the game just fine. Production issues aside, I think that it is a gorgeous looking game with nice design choices that enhance the theme and that it represents some nice little unique mini games such as the cipher break to keep play fresh and not just a bunch of moving around and cashing in sets. It is too soon to say if this is a classic that will stand the test of time but I have been enjoying myself with it and already played it enough to warrant having bought it. Covert is a mechanically solid game with interesting choices that isn't always as socially fun as it is intellectually rewarding to play.

My Game Night Group's (aka The Cult of The New's) Conclusion
I've played Covert at least 4-5 times over the last few weeks with 12 different people. Mostly the reception has been muted. No one has said they'd not play again and about three of them said they really liked it but you wouldn't have been able to tell from the way they were playing. Heads down, deep in thought, endlessly calculating. I think it is fair to say at this point that the game lends itself well to my friends that are more inclined to the brain burners. People with AP will have a hard time with this game. One play a friend was asking questions non stop and it caused the whole game to drag. A common critique of the game was that everyone who played it could see it only ever taking longer and longer to play as opposed to less and less time because as people became more aware of their choices they would bog down more and more in AP land. Some would not mind this. Others, would find it to be a kind of hell they would desperately seek to avoid. I'd say that the game has faired best with the analytical types and not as well with the social more gregarious crowd so far. The good news is, everyone I have played it with will play it again so that is a good sign!

Other reviews by me. or the blog, "Cult of The New" Finally, follow me on twitter where I tweet my logged plays and reviews as well at @AFABBI.
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François Mahieu
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Thanks for the review. Very nicely done! (Another game I won't buy in Essen)
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Asaf Fabbi
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poifpoif wrote:
Thanks for the review. Very nicely done! (Another game I won't buy in Essen)


Thank you for the compliment! I would love to go to Essen one day. I go to Gen Con as often as I can and love it.
 
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A very helpful review for different flavours of player.

If the world was a fair place, you'd get a lot of thumbs for this.

Cheers,

M B
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Asaf Fabbi
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mudshark_baby wrote:
A very helpful review for different flavours of player.

If the world was a fair place, you'd get a lot of thumbs for this.

Cheers,

M B


Thanks! I admit I do appreciate the thumbs
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Thanks so much for the review!

Quote:
Icon confusion. The player screens needed to have "translations" of the icons for the pictures on the agency and equipment cards to the icon requirements on the mission cards. e.g., the lock picks icon look really different on the mission card than they do on the equipment and agency cards. Personally, I found this added a little friction to the game play as players had to double check icons a lot more and in some cases even made mistakes because they thought they had a icon they didn't etc.

I consider that a cardinal sin of graphic design. Why have mismatched icons for different components? Really disappointing oversight there.

How big of a factor is this in practice? Are there a lot of icons to deal with and thus a lot of translating, or is it a handful of icons that once learned won't present any long-term issues?
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Asaf Fabbi
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MentatYP wrote:
Thanks so much for the review!

Quote:
Icon confusion. The player screens needed to have "translations" of the icons for the pictures on the agency and equipment cards to the icon requirements on the mission cards. e.g., the lock picks icon look really different on the mission card than they do on the equipment and agency cards. Personally, I found this added a little friction to the game play as players had to double check icons a lot more and in some cases even made mistakes because they thought they had a icon they didn't etc.

I consider that a cardinal sin of graphic design. Why have mismatched icons for different components? Really disappointing oversight there.

How big of a factor is this in practice? Are there a lot of icons to deal with and thus a lot of translating, or is it a handful of icons that once learned won't present any long-term issues?


I'd say the latter. After a few rounds people were able to process them. There are not too many icons fortunately.
 
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Ryan Bretsch
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This review sealed it for me. I'm more of the gregarious type player. This one looks to be a well-designed game mechanically but one that doesn't seem all that much fun to play, unless you are the super analytical type.

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Kane Klenko
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rdbret wrote:
This review sealed it for me. I'm more of the gregarious type player. This one looks to be a well-designed game mechanically but one that doesn't seem all that much fun to play, unless you are the super analytical type.



While I'm not sure this is the type of game you're looking for, I wouldn't agree with that statement. When I play any game I play for fun, and winning is secondary. I play from the gut, and don't over-analyze anything. And Covert is my favorite Euro style game that I've ever played (Amun-Re, El Grande, and Castles of Burgundy are probably next). Every design decision I made hinged on the question "What is more fun?", which is why I left a lot of things wide open, giving players more opportunities to chain abilities together and make clever moves. There are definitely restrictions in the game, because I think tension in games is fun too, but I certainly wouldn't classify Covert as an over-analytical game. Just one that gives you a lot to think about in a puzzly sort of way.

But like I said...it certainly won't be to everyone's tastes. I don't expect to ever design a game that is.
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Favre4MVP wrote:
rdbret wrote:
This review sealed it for me. I'm more of the gregarious type player. This one looks to be a well-designed game mechanically but one that doesn't seem all that much fun to play, unless you are the super analytical type.



While I'm not sure this is the type of game you're looking for, I wouldn't agree with that statement. When I play any game I play for fun, and winning is secondary. I play from the gut, and don't over-analyze anything. And Covert is my favorite Euro style game that I've ever played (Amun-Re, El Grande, and Castles of Burgundy are probably next). Every design decision I made hinged on the question "What is more fun?", which is why I left a lot of things wide open, giving players more opportunities to chain abilities together and make clever moves. There are definitely restrictions in the game, because I think tension in games is fun too, but I certainly wouldn't classify Covert as an over-analytical game. Just one that gives you a lot to think about in a puzzly sort of way.

But like I said...it certainly won't be to everyone's tastes. I don't expect to ever design a game that is.


It's always nice to hear the designer's/production's side of things. Thanks for posting!
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Ryan Bretsch
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Favre4MVP wrote:
rdbret wrote:
This review sealed it for me. I'm more of the gregarious type player. This one looks to be a well-designed game mechanically but one that doesn't seem all that much fun to play, unless you are the super analytical type.



While I'm not sure this is the type of game you're looking for, I wouldn't agree with that statement. When I play any game I play for fun, and winning is secondary. I play from the gut, and don't over-analyze anything. And Covert is my favorite Euro style game that I've ever played (Amun-Re, El Grande, and Castles of Burgundy are probably next). Every design decision I made hinged on the question "What is more fun?", which is why I left a lot of things wide open, giving players more opportunities to chain abilities together and make clever moves. There are definitely restrictions in the game, because I think tension in games is fun too, but I certainly wouldn't classify Covert as an over-analytical game. Just one that gives you a lot to think about in a puzzly sort of way.

But like I said...it certainly won't be to everyone's tastes. I don't expect to ever design a game that is.


I agree. My original comments are not the most accurate conveyance of what is essentially my singular opinion. I could have been more accurate in tailoring and framing my thoughts this way:

"Covert appears to be a well-designed mechanically but one that probably wouldn't seem as much fun to play for me. This game, in my opinion, seems to be better suited for people who are more analytically inclined in their enjoyment of boardgames than myself."
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Doug Birdwise
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I just purchased this game and am waiting for it to arrive. I think this review is spot on.

I am disappointed in the spy characters as they appear to be modern in design and not of the Cold War era. I would strongly prefer real "Cold War" spys that are more interesting than what is provided. Some that come to mind are: Kim Philby, Guy Burgess, Klaus Fuchs, Aldrich Ames, Julius Rosenberg, Anthony Blunt, Adolf Tolkachev. I just might make up some of my own Cold War Spy Character Cards to enliven this game.
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Cosmix wrote:
I just purchased this game and am waiting for it to arrive. I think this review is spot on.

I am disappointed in the spy characters as they appear to be modern in design and not of the Cold War era. I would strongly prefer real "Cold War" spys that are more interesting than what is provided. Some that come to mind are: Kim Philby, Guy Burgess, Klaus Fuchs, Aldrich Ames, Julius Rosenberg, Anthony Blunt, Adolf Tolkachev. I just might make up some of my own Cold War Spy Character Cards to enliven this game.


Having actual cold war spies would have definitely been a nice thematic detail. I agree
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AFABBI wrote:
Cosmix wrote:
I just purchased this game and am waiting for it to arrive. I think this review is spot on.

I am disappointed in the spy characters as they appear to be modern in design and not of the Cold War era. I would strongly prefer real "Cold War" spys that are more interesting than what is provided. Some that come to mind are: Kim Philby, Guy Burgess, Klaus Fuchs, Aldrich Ames, Julius Rosenberg, Anthony Blunt, Adolf Tolkachev. I just might make up some of my own Cold War Spy Character Cards to enliven this game.


Having actual cold war spies would have definitely been a nice thematic detail. I agree


I might even add some film spy's such as George Smiley, Karla, M, Bond, etc. Just for added fun.
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My gaming group played this for the first time tonight. The 3 players really liked the game even though we had some confusion with some of the icons (recorder in a briefcase versus reel icon for example, and the icon for discarding an Agency Card). All 3 said they would want to play again soon, as the first game was more of a learning experience. I initially thought the code breaking might be too simplistic but we enjoyed that part of the game. Final scores were about 47, 54 and the winner with over 60 points primarily due to getting the higher scoring Mission Cards. Great fun. Looking forward to playing it again.

One issue we found was that when solving the codes, one person tried to place one die to solve one code and then, after taking their die back, exchanged positions of two dice to solve a second code. We read the rules which seem to indicate you must exchange dice position first. Any comments on this?
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Cosmix wrote:
My gaming group played this for the first time tonight. The 3 players really liked the game even though we had some confusion with some of the icons (recorder in a briefcase versus reel icon for example, and the icon for discarding an Agency Card). All 3 said they would want to play again soon, as the first game was more of a learning experience. I initially thought the code breaking might be too simplistic but we enjoyed that part of the game. Final scores were about 47, 54 and the winner with over 60 points primarily due to getting the higher scoring Mission Cards. Great fun. Looking forward to playing it again.

One issue we found was that when solving the codes, one person tried to place one die to solve one code and then, after taking their die back, exchanged positions of two dice to solve a second code. We read the rules which seem to indicate you must exchange dice position first. Any comments on this?


So I don't think code breaking works like that. I believe based on the rules I read over again just now on page 5 of the rules book show that you swap numbers tile positions, then place dice, then break one or two codes with the new configuration. THEN remove dice, and pass play to the next player.

I hope that helps. Also, if I am missing the question or wrong, someone please correct me.
 
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Cosmix wrote:
My gaming group played this for the first time tonight. The 3 players really liked the game even though we had some confusion with some of the icons (recorder in a briefcase versus reel icon for example, and the icon for discarding an Agency Card). All 3 said they would want to play again soon, as the first game was more of a learning experience. I initially thought the code breaking might be too simplistic but we enjoyed that part of the game. Final scores were about 47, 54 and the winner with over 60 points primarily due to getting the higher scoring Mission Cards. Great fun. Looking forward to playing it again.

One issue we found was that when solving the codes, one person tried to place one die to solve one code and then, after taking their die back, exchanged positions of two dice to solve a second code. We read the rules which seem to indicate you must exchange dice position first. Any comments on this?


You can solve and swap in any order, so long as there is only one swap (unless using a special action, of course) & any dice placed are each only used to break one code.
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Doug Birdwise
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I shall try to be more precise explaining what happened. This is not the exact numbers played and faced last night; just an example.

I placed a 6 die on the coder to use to solve a code. The cipher order was as follows: 123456. My two codes to be solved were 126 and 245. So I placed my 6 die on top of the 3 cipher number to solve for code 126. Then I removed my 6 die and switched 2 and 3 to get 245 to solve for 245.
 
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That is legal.
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Dave Anderson
United States
State College
Pennsylvania
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I have found this game to be phenomenal! I love that there are so many ways to complete your actions. It's like putting together a puzzle, but after you found the piece you need, the opening has shifted and so you have to find another piece. Which, I guess could sound frustrating, but it isn't! My wife and I are not the "brain – burning" type of gamers, but we really like this one. It makes our brains itch in such a good way!

Oh, and just as an example, in the game last night I made a mistake in the order in which I retrieved my dice (moved out of a zone before I took the agent card I needed from that zone). But, because there are multiple ways to get the item I needed, I was able to get it another way. In a normal worker placement game I would've been toast and ruined that round. I like that!
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Kevin Boroduwicz
Scotland
Lytham St Annes
Lancashire
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Thank you very much for the excellent review. I still wasn't quite sure whether it was for me but Kane's contribution tipped me over the edge - wishlisted and will be purchsed before long.
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Asaf Fabbi
United States
Albany
New York
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You're welcome! Thanks for the compliment.
 
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Chris Bailey
United States
Broomfield
Colorado
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MentatYP wrote:
Thanks so much for the review!

Quote:
Icon confusion. The player screens needed to have "translations" of the icons for the pictures on the agency and equipment cards to the icon requirements on the mission cards. e.g., the lock picks icon look really different on the mission card than they do on the equipment and agency cards. Personally, I found this added a little friction to the game play as players had to double check icons a lot more and in some cases even made mistakes because they thought they had a icon they didn't etc.

I consider that a cardinal sin of graphic design. Why have mismatched icons for different components? Really disappointing oversight there.

How big of a factor is this in practice? Are there a lot of icons to deal with and thus a lot of translating, or is it a handful of icons that once learned won't present any long-term issues?


I'm curious about the icons. Would it be a simple matter to print out fixes on labels and stick them over the confusing icons?
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Asaf Fabbi
United States
Albany
New York
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You could do that but I think after a few games you would become familiar enough for it to matter less.
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