$20.00
$5.00
$30.00
$15.00
Recommend
1 
 Thumb up
 Hide
7 Posts

Strat-O-Matic Pro Football» Forums » Rules

Subject: advanced defense rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Nick Dotzenrod
United States
Novi
Michigan
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Does the exact name of the player always need to be guessed when keying in on a running back or double teaming a receiver?

A team can obviously choose from several half backs. Does the defense have to not only key in on a running back, but also pick the correct name?

I would think just keying in on a halfback is enough, but technically, a play could use more than one halfback. So I was not sure.

For double teaming, same thing. Do you need to specify the correct flanker/split end/tight end etc. when double teaming? Or is just picking the correct position enough to give you credit for the double team?

I feel it is a little unfair if you have to guess the correct name, because in real football, you would get to see all the players on the field so you could rule out some receivers from being guessed.

Thanks!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Larry Lavin
United States
Cambridge
Illinois
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
You key, and double-team, a position. Not an individual. Even if two halfbacks are in the game at the same time, one must be designated the halfback, and the other must be designated as playing a different position(fullback, etc.).
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Nick Dotzenrod
United States
Novi
Michigan
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
This is kind of trivial, but does the offensive player need to lock in a player for a play then?

It seems they only have to lock in the position that play is going to. So even after the defense moves defenders/decides to key/double team, the offense can change who the actual player will be? (obviously the position the play is going to is locked, but the player could still change).

For example, the offense decides to go with an end run play. Locks in the play and position. Then defense is allowed to move defenders.

Then after defender is done, he shows he wanted to key in on the halfback, which was the position the offense chose. Can the offense at this point switch who the halfback is?

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Robert Hawkins
United States
Mooresville
North Carolina
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
No. The 11 players are on the field for a play. Think of it like a real football game. Both teams know which players are on the field for a particular play - you can't sub mid-way through a play. Or maybe I'm complete missing what you're saying...
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Timothy Sullivan
United States
Glen Carbon
Illinois
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I think that's the key point you were missing. The offense announces (and locks in) his "package" -- the formation he's using and the players filling each position. Thus, when the defensive coach selects a position to key or double cover, he's effectively selecting the particular player.

For example, you announce that you're running a standard offense. Noticing that both of your wide receivers are listed at both "Split End" and "Flanker," you announce that "Smith will be the split end and Jones will be the flanker." Then if the defensive coach uses the free safety to double cover the flanker, there's no confusion -- he's doubling Jones. (In fact, it's not unusual for the defensive coach to ask you to verify what position Jones is playing or even just say "he's double covering whatever position Jones is playing.")

In leagues, in order to make things run more smoothly, gamers typically write down a starting set of lineups of "who's playing what" under various packages. Then before each play they simply announce "I'm using my standard package" or "I'm going to the 3 WR package" or "I'm switching to the package labeled short-yardage." They're free to change it up if they want or (of course) if there's an injury, but this way there's no argument on a 4th quarter crucial play about who was playing Fullback and who was Halfback.

You didn't ask, but after the offense announces his package (but before he selects his play), the defense has to do the same thing. For example, the defense can bring in an extra DB or swap his players so that, for example, the better CB is covering a particular receiver.

Finally, note that the offense can call time out (instead of calling a play) if he doesn't like the match up. Also there is an advanced rule that when the offense elects to play hurry-up, neither team can make substitutions or change formations.

All this talk makes me want to pull out my game! laugh

All the best!

Tim

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Nick Dotzenrod
United States
Novi
Michigan
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Ok thanks guys for the clarifications.

So how exactly could someone use 3 wide receivers? There is only one flanker spot and and one split end spot.

What about 4 wide receivers?

Also, maybe I am making this overly confusing.

Thanks!

Nick
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Timothy Sullivan
United States
Glen Carbon
Illinois
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
The rulebook explains the other formations. For example, 3 WR & 1 RB, you replace either the FB or HB with either a SE or FL. The rulebook will also describe the effects on play. For example (unless the defense switches its package), switching to 3 WR & 1 RB has the following effects (among others):

1. The FS has coverage on the 3rd WR and can't double cover.
2. Each offensive lineman's and running back's pass block ratings are reduced by one.

You'll want to read the section of the rulebook that explains these formations and their effects.

Tim
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.