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Subject: Games for german class for beginners (ages 8-10) rss

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Christoph Wolf
Spain
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I will be teaching German this year to 8-10 year old children. It is a beginners class, they have no knowledge of German so far and we will have only one class per week. The idea is to get them started and more important motivated to continue in the future years (in this school German is mandatory until they finish high school).

I would like to use games so they have fun in class and to have them practice the vocabulary they learn. Of course it has to be games that don't need much vocabulary.

My ideas so far are Bingo and Bluff for learning the numbers and the all time classic Memory for any other subject.

Any ideas are welcome

PD: did a quick search on the matter in this forum and didn't find much as the other threads were talking mainly about more advanced students. If you can point out another helpful thread that would also be nice.
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Stéphane Athimon
France
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Hello,
I think Die Sprache des Manitu could be interesting in order to get them used to German pronuncioation :-)
That's all I can think of for the moment.
Oh, yes if you want to work with them on numbers you also have 6 nimmt!
Good luck :-)
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Florian Woo
Germany
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Team Work Original is good for language classes, but maybe not for beginners. As well is Attribute or Such a Thing?.

There are some language Memory-like games, which could do it for the beginning. One card is an image, the other is the German term.

And what about Codenames or Codenames: Pictures.
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Charles Waterman
United States
Commerce Township
Michigan
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Reverse Charades as a vocabulary review is a great game and involves a lot of students at the same time.

Bingo is really great if you insist that the WHOLE game has to be played in German, and that the students take turns being the caller, and telling each other, "Fertig?" or "Ich bin fertig." or "Zwanzig, bitte?" and so on! You can even teach them "hurry up!" or "blast!" or "oh, yeahhhh!" in German as useful trash talk in German! I'm serious!

Word on the Street Junior edition might work well if you can get a German edition. Again, you'll want to get category cards that match the vocabulary they've been learning. (A job people do outside / A city in Germany / A color of leaves / a kind of summer food, etc.)

+1 to Codenames - but it's hard to get a good set of cards. The game really is designed to work with homonyms and words with several shades of meaning.
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baker mouse
United States
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I think HABA games would be a good place to start. I am not sure if the English versions have german rules in them but it seems the german versions are fairly easy to find.
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Charles Waterman
United States
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Checking out HABA's games is a good idea. Also, there was a German word game called Haste Worte that looked fun and **might** work. If these games we're suggesting are too challenging please let us know and we can try to come up with even simpler alternatives!

Oh! Just thought of Bananagrams and Apples to Apples. Are there German editions of those games, and would they be helpful?

https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/3119/haste-worte

https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgameversion/51382/pegasus-ger...

https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgameversion/40296/german-edit...

In general, I'd also check out AMIGO's games!

Word on the Street:
http://www.amigo-spiele.de/spiel/word-on-the-street
(It's unfortunate that the German version doesn't include the common starting letter J (and Q?).

Snake Oil:
http://www.amigo-spiele.de/spiel/snake-oil




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Christoph Wolf
Spain
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Thanks a lot everybody!

The games will be played in beginners classes with about 25 students, so they are mainly to repeat vocabulary, I'm happy if at the end of the school year each student will be able to present himself and has a bit of basic vocabulary (only one class =~45 min per week).
I really liked the idea with Die Sprache des Manitu though. To train the pronunciation of "ei" "ie" "eu" and such things.

Charades could also work, and I think that reverse charades is a good idea as it makes a big part of the class keep quiet, that's always nice to have
But maybe I will not have it completely reverse as that would leave me with a dozen students standing up and acting and could be quite chaotic, maybe half of the group. This will be useful towards the end of the year or for the other classes that already had German last year.

The Haba games are also a good idea, I own quite some of them, but they are normally only for 2-4 players. If you have one in mind that you think could work with bigger groups I would like to hear about it.

Apples to apples also seems to work best with smaller groups, bananagram needs the players to have more vocabulary, maybe it could be played with dictionaries but I would be afraid to lose the pieces in class

Haste Worte could work with the students but seems to be best with smaller groups as well. Maybe I could have a gaming class or two at the end of the year where I split them into different groups.

Thank you very much again everybody for the ideas! It really helped me, if you can come up with anything else let me know. If I remember I will tell you about how it goes later this year
 
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Charles Waterman
United States
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Glad our ideas are helpful! I think you might want to reconsider two things, though:

1) When I use Reverse Charades in a college or high school level EFL group here in Japan, I split the class into FOUR groups. (That way each team only has 6-7 members, and only 4-5 up front) I either have each group go one at a time, or if the classroom is large enough, two groups go at the same time (one in the front, one in the back OR one front left, one front right). That makes the room a bit more chaotic, but it adds to the fun - especially if the students are mature enough to play honestly and keep track of the cards correctly guessed without me having to control the scoring. If that's too chaotic, though (or if I have immature Ss) then one group at a time is good. I also often review the vocabulary on 40 cards or so very quickly (flashcard style) before starting the first round, and then again when the pile of cards gets below 15 I review more cards and add them to the pile and shuffle.

2) Apples to Apples works very well with 5-6 players! I wouldn't go above 6 though, that's true. Especially if you either

A) add the rule that there can only be N-2 red cards on the table each round (N = number of students playing For example, 6 players, one judge = 4 cards max can be played by the other 5 players)

AND/OR

B) Set a 2 minute time limit after cards are revealed each round, and tell the judge to give one chip (not included) to each player who uses one sentence to try to explain the reason for one of the cards IN GERMAN. Then the person who the judge chooses would get 3 chips, and play until someone has 10 chips or so.
 
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