GeekGold Bonus for All Supporters at year's end: 1000!

9,080 Supporters

$15 min for supporter badge & GeekGold bonus
18 Days Left

Support:

Recommend
1 
 Thumb up
 Hide
7 Posts

Thunder Alley» Forums » Rules

Subject: Lead movement to front of pack rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Kevin Hards
United Kingdom
Chelmsford
Essex
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The following came up last night in a game and we wanted to confirm that we played it right.

<-- front of pack
====[A]=[B]=[C]=[D]=[E]=

D plays a lead movement, moves laterally taking E along for the ride.

=============[D]=
====[A]=[B]=[C]=[E]=

D then moves all the way to the front of the pack.

=[D]=[E]=
====[A]=[B]=[C]=

D then moves laterally in front of A. Should E then move (as below) along side D?

=[E]=
=[D]=[A]=[B]=[C]=

In our game E was from a different team to D, was still active and was due to play next, does this give car E a bit of an advantage? As it's been given a free ride to a position where it can now play a card to get itself the lead of the pack.

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Greg
United States
Lowell
Indiana
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
It's been awhile sinc I've played, but yeah, that seemed correct. The trailing car directly behind the active car follows each space the active car passed through, so in your example, it ends up beside the active car.

Yes, it does help out car E. That's part of the tactical decisions in Thunder Alley. There are times you need to decide if helping an opponent is worth it to you, or do you play a solo move card in that situation? Also, choosing which of your vehicles to move at which time can be important, as you don't really want one getting left alone too often. You can also make deals with other players that you will help then out with your play if they help you on their play. That can work until a point where you have to just go for yourself towards the end.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kevin Hards
United Kingdom
Chelmsford
Essex
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Cheers Greg. Thanks for the quick response, after reading and re-reading the rules we thought we had it right but wanted to confirm.

:edit:

Does anyone feel that thematically it's a bit 'iffy'? You power up the side of the pack of cars, the car behind powers along up behind you. You nip in front of the lead car, look to your right and see the car that was behind you slamming on the gas and shooting off into the distance.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Stig Morten
Norway
Kvernaland
flag msg tools
Thunder Alley: Crew Chief Expansion - Coming soon to Kickstarter!
badge
Evil lurks here!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
khards wrote:
Cheers Greg. Thanks for the quick response, after reading and re-reading the rules we thought we had it right but wanted to confirm.

:edit:

Does anyone feel that thematically it's a bit 'iffy'? You power up the side of the pack of cars, the car behind powers along up behind you. You nip in front of the lead car, look to your right and see the car that was behind you slamming on the gas and shooting off into the distance.


I say it was a very good play by the one that followed you all the way to the front. Exellent use of drag and timing.


2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Laudermilk
United States
Orange County
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Yes, that seems right. I have actually run into nearly that exact situation and your example is how I've played it.

khards wrote:
Cheers Greg. Thanks for the quick response, after reading and re-reading the rules we thought we had it right but wanted to confirm.

:edit:

Does anyone feel that thematically it's a bit 'iffy'? You power up the side of the pack of cars, the car behind powers along up behind you. You nip in front of the lead car, look to your right and see the car that was behind you slamming on the gas and shooting off into the distance.

Nope, thematically it's about right. Read up on how drafting--and side-drafting--works. Not only is this plausible, I have seen this very effect occur in races.

Also keep in mind that each player turn is ultimately arriving at a final end-of-round snapshot of the field. Yes, there are some turn-to-turn situations that look really odd, but by the end of the round everything sorts out and makes sense.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Joseph Dooley
United States
Kingston
Tennessee
flag msg tools
This is an excellent example of the "Daytona Slingshot" maneuver rendered in Thunder Alley, in addition to the "Slingshot" card. Because of the draft effect, the two (or more) drafting cars have slightly lower drag and higher speed than a solo car. To perform the slingshot, the car drafting another backs off slightly and then accelerates forward into the wake of the leading car. At the last moment, the following car veers into the other lane. Two things happen simultaneously: (1)the trailing car briefly has a speed advantage over the lead car and (2) the drag on the lead car goes up suddenly as the draft is broken. Together, these can give trailing car the speed edge it needs to pass.

This, in effect, is what is modeled here. Car E has just veered out from behind the lead car and is positioned to exploit the transient advantage.

In reality, it is a demanding maneuver. The car attempting to pass must have some good rubber, a strong engine and very good driver, else the veer becomes a fishtailing or a spinout.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Clint Pewtress
Canada
Guelph
Ontario, Canada
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Alternatively, D could muscle into the pack short of the lead (ideally with other cars yet to move that would have to take D with them)... E is stranded against the wall, out of draft, and a solo move wouldn't carry him very far away on his own...
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.