$15.00
$30.00
$5.00
$20.00
Recommend
5 
 Thumb up
 Hide
11 Posts

Cry Havoc» Forums » General

Subject: First impressions after two games in a row. rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Bruno Gaia
France
Asnières
flag msg tools
designer
Being a Geek is a sure sign of a sound mind, cause it means you think that life as it is is dull and should be more interesting. Which it is.
mbmbmbmbmb
When I first heard of Cry Havoc, there was not a lot of choice for me. I collect everything that has "Oracz" written on it since I discovered Neuroshima Hex and, as a rule, I insta-buy everything that has Ignacy's seal of approval (and I've rarely been disappointed, doing that!)

But for a reason unknown, I thought of CH as a "nice" game. Maybe because of the minis, I don't know.
I even told my ex (also a fan of Portal and a great fan of Ignacy) that I thought the cover looked very... rough... brutal compared to the pics we had of the game which made me think of a war game yes, but sort'o'nice...

Now I've played it for real, twice (two players: one human, one Pilgrimm).

Apart from giving it a 9 without a second thought, I can tell you that it is one of the meanest, nastiest, brutally brutal game in my collection and I pride myself in owning a couple of really nasty brutal stuff game-wise.

It's a beast!

I'm looking forward to playing it again (tomorrow normally) and I'll try to deliver a proper review for once (I rarely have the time those days, because of my music).
This game deserves it.
7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Grant Rodiek
United States
Redwood City
CA
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks for your comments, Bruno. I cannot tell you how thrilled I was when Ignacy told me Michal O was coming on board as a designer. And already having Michal W (who worked extensively on Legacy, which I love, was mega thumbs up).

The game was designed, day 1, to be a brutal game around combat. That meant we had to put in safeguards to make repeated combat fun, and fair, but yes, it is meant to be a game of conflict. As a player, I loathe:

1. Turtling
2. Spending the entire game building towards one battle

Cry Havoc exists to do the opposite.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bruno Gaia
France
Asnières
flag msg tools
designer
Being a Geek is a sure sign of a sound mind, cause it means you think that life as it is is dull and should be more interesting. Which it is.
mbmbmbmbmb
HerrohGrant wrote:
Thanks for your comments, Bruno. I cannot tell you how thrilled I was when Ignacy told me Michal O was coming on board as a designer. And already having Michal W (who worked extensively on Legacy, which I love, was mega thumbs up).

The game was designed, day 1, to be a brutal game around combat. That meant we had to put in safeguards to make repeated combat fun, and fair, but yes, it is meant to be a game of conflict. As a player, I loathe:

1. Turtling
2. Spending the entire game building towards one battle

Cry Havoc exists to do the opposite.


And it does that in a very elegant way indeed! Good job!

We (all my players and I) love a brain feast AND most of us love gritty brutality. And we are often frustrated by the fact that most brain feasts are "nice" games and most brutal games are dice feasts.
You deliver exactly what scratches that precise itch that is widely spread in my group.

I can see Cry Havoc getting some extremely serious table time now, the way Neuroshima Hex did a while ago (after more than 5k games of it IRL and online, I still love the game but, quite logically, I tend to play other games more now XD!)
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Grant Rodiek
United States
Redwood City
CA
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
5k!!!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bruno Gaia
France
Asnières
flag msg tools
designer
Being a Geek is a sure sign of a sound mind, cause it means you think that life as it is is dull and should be more interesting. Which it is.
mbmbmbmbmb
HerrohGrant wrote:
5k!!!


Yep. We used to play every evening woth my ex, three to four games a night, plus games on the app (the free one at the time) On the app I eneded at something around 2k games. But since I played a lot of NH IRL in the course of say tthree years (plus two other with much less games a week) I really think 5k might a bit of an overstatement, but not that much!

Note that NH has been top of my BGG list since I first logged in and hasn't moved from there ever since XD!

This being said I have and still love many other games, especially 51st state by Michal infamous partner/editor that replaced NH in our couple's gaming night for a few years too!

All in all over the past ten years I think that one out of three IRL games I've plaved has been played on a Portal game (NH, 51st, Theseus and Robinson mainly)

Oh and I also have AND DISPLAY the f****ing FRIDGE MAGNETS!



On a side note I played CH again this afternoon and we had a heck of a ball.
Review incoming as soon as my music leaves me enough time .
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Grant Rodiek
United States
Redwood City
CA
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Glad you dig it!!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mad Halfling
United Kingdom
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
HerrohGrant wrote:
The game was designed, day 1, to be a brutal game around combat. That meant we had to put in safeguards to make repeated combat fun, and fair, but yes, it is meant to be a game of conflict.


One thing I like about owning both Cry Havoc and Scythe is that whilst they're both (to me) similar in "flavour" - quite open movement area control games with asymetric factions - they're very different in execution and constrast well with each other. One is a real Euro with lots of resource management, the other is carnage with interesting options and tactics. That way, if we're in the mood for this "flavour" we also have the choice of the two styles.

We really enjoyed both games and are looking forward to playing both of them again.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Grant Rodiek
United States
Redwood City
CA
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Mad-Halfling wrote:
HerrohGrant wrote:
The game was designed, day 1, to be a brutal game around combat. That meant we had to put in safeguards to make repeated combat fun, and fair, but yes, it is meant to be a game of conflict.


One thing I like about owning both Cry Havoc and Scythe is that whilst they're both (to me) similar in "flavour" - quite open movement area control games with asymetric factions - they're very different in execution and constrast well with each other. One is a real Euro with lots of resource management, the other is carnage with interesting options and tactics. That way, if we're in the mood for this "flavour" we also have the choice of the two styles.

We really enjoyed both games and are looking forward to playing both of them again.


Glorious!

I didn't actually intend to make Cry Havoc a euro. And, when I started it back in 2012, I hadn't PLAYED that many Euros. The euro style design came about as a result of making it work with 2-4. With 2 player conflict games, you can just make it a blood bath. But, with 2+, you need to use points and other mechanisms to make it fair and keep folks involved.

And as a result, uh...euroness emerged!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mad Halfling
United Kingdom
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
HerrohGrant wrote:
Glorious!

I didn't actually intend to make Cry Havoc a euro. And, when I started it back in 2012, I hadn't PLAYED that many Euros. The euro style design came about as a result of making it work with 2-4. With 2 player conflict games, you can just make it a blood bath. But, with 2+, you need to use points and other mechanisms to make it fair and keep folks involved.

And as a result, uh...euroness emerged!


That's very interesting - though it's aggressive and dynamic, I still thought there was an underlying Euro feeling in the mechanisms, especially the combat which doesn't have any of the randomness in it that other American-style games of this ilk have - only what cards people might have, and even those are limited to the players' base decks and what they've drawn from the terrain decks. I'd figured this was intended and baked in from the start.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Grant Rodiek
United States
Redwood City
CA
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Mad-Halfling wrote:
HerrohGrant wrote:
Glorious!

I didn't actually intend to make Cry Havoc a euro. And, when I started it back in 2012, I hadn't PLAYED that many Euros. The euro style design came about as a result of making it work with 2-4. With 2 player conflict games, you can just make it a blood bath. But, with 2+, you need to use points and other mechanisms to make it fair and keep folks involved.

And as a result, uh...euroness emerged!


That's very interesting - though it's aggressive and dynamic, I still thought there was an underlying Euro feeling in the mechanisms, especially the combat which doesn't have any of the randomness in it that other American-style games of this ilk have - only what cards people might have, and even those are limited to the players' base decks and what they've drawn from the terrain decks. I'd figured this was intended and baked in from the start.


My starting goals, which drove the design for 2.5 years until Portal signed it (and largely continued them):

1. 2-4 players. I noticed most war games (that I saw) were just 2 players.

2. Short play time. I noticed a lot of games (like the GMT ones) were VERY LONG.

3. No dice at all. Seemed like a good challenge? And again, in my limited experience, so many games used dice for resolution.

Beyond that, I wanted battle and conflict to be the focus. I didn't want anybody to sit back, or turtle.

The first core element that came into the game was the cards. Originally, cards had a 1-3 and a symbol (cannon/horse/infantry). You spent cards for reinforcements (#) or in sets for the symbols to execute battle tactics.

The battle system began as an abstraction of a Napoleonic attrition model. Basically, high attrition on both sides, with key breakthroughs (leveraging flank exposure, artillery, and cavalry charges) causing the decisive shift.

Humble origins, years of work, and it...became something cool I think.
3 
 Thumb up
0.25
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bruno Gaia
France
Asnières
flag msg tools
designer
Being a Geek is a sure sign of a sound mind, cause it means you think that life as it is is dull and should be more interesting. Which it is.
mbmbmbmbmb
HerrohGrant wrote:
Mad-Halfling wrote:
HerrohGrant wrote:
Glorious!

I didn't actually intend to make Cry Havoc a euro. And, when I started it back in 2012, I hadn't PLAYED that many Euros. The euro style design came about as a result of making it work with 2-4. With 2 player conflict games, you can just make it a blood bath. But, with 2+, you need to use points and other mechanisms to make it fair and keep folks involved.

And as a result, uh...euroness emerged!


That's very interesting - though it's aggressive and dynamic, I still thought there was an underlying Euro feeling in the mechanisms, especially the combat which doesn't have any of the randomness in it that other American-style games of this ilk have - only what cards people might have, and even those are limited to the players' base decks and what they've drawn from the terrain decks. I'd figured this was intended and baked in from the start.


My starting goals, which drove the design for 2.5 years until Portal signed it (and largely continued them):

1. 2-4 players. I noticed most war games (that I saw) were just 2 players.

2. Short play time. I noticed a lot of games (like the GMT ones) were VERY LONG.

3. No dice at all. Seemed like a good challenge? And again, in my limited experience, so many games used dice for resolution.

Beyond that, I wanted battle and conflict to be the focus. I didn't want anybody to sit back, or turtle.

The first core element that came into the game was the cards. Originally, cards had a 1-3 and a symbol (cannon/horse/infantry). You spent cards for reinforcements (#) or in sets for the symbols to execute battle tactics.

The battle system began as an abstraction of a Napoleonic attrition model. Basically, high attrition on both sides, with key breakthroughs (leveraging flank exposure, artillery, and cavalry charges) causing the decisive shift.

Humble origins, years of work, and it...became something cool I think.


I can assure you it did. At least in MY point of view!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.