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The Great War in the East» Forums » Sessions

Subject: Serbia/Galicia Second Play AAR rss

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Paul
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"Capitaine Conan," by Roger Vercel (1934).
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After playing Serbia/Galicia this weekend I wanted to give the game a second try. It had been a long time since I played, and I felt a bit rusty, and that I had played both sides a bit too conservatively.

This game turned out a bit differently, with one big surprise.

I'll dispense with the initial set up as I posted that last AAR.

This is the situation on game turn 6. As the Austro-Hungarians I deployed two armies, the 3rd and 4th on the western end of Galicia and drove as hard as I could north towards the single Russian army (the 4th) detraining at the map edge. I made good progress, and closed in, but even moving as fast as I could and actually putting the reinforcement hex into a ZOC, delaying some of the Russian troops, the relentless pressure from the East meant I had to pull back to avoid being enveloped.



On the Serbian front I elected to have the corps of the AH 2nd Army remain in theater and had them march east of Belgrade. This caused the Serbs to sting themselves out along the Danube, and abandon the far western part of Serbia.

On game turn 7 the two AH corps of the 2nd army, with support of the AH monitor flotilla managed to cross the Danube with minimal losses and establish a foothold. An extremely unlucky Serbian counter attack by four divisions was thrown back with heavy losses (rolled a 6) and effectively put an end to local resistance to the crossing. See below:




On the Galician front the AH forces continued to pull back with some heavy attacks and counter attacks by both sides. Attacking with 3 or 4 corps can get really costly in terms of losses, and both sides suffered heavy casualties.

The Russian 8th Army (Brusilov) swung south, heading for the Carpathians. The small AH forces in the area resisted as well as they could.

On GT 9 the unthinkable happened--Belgrade was abandoned, and the Serbian forces pulled back into the hills to the south. The AH corps rolling up the southern bank of the Danube, with the AH monitors in support were just too strong to stop. Also some bad rolls on Serbian munitions re-provisioning made a counter-attack impossible.

The final situation was very interesting. In Galicia the AH forces had been forced back to the San, and hinged on the great fortress along the river. A counter-attack by the AH 1st Army had retaken some of the Carpathian passes, but the Russian 8th Army was in firm possession of the pass in the far south.

On the Serbian Front the weight of the three army corps of the AH 2nd Army were just too much to resist. An AH attack from the east of Belgrade is very hard to stop once it gets across the Danube.

The result: 26 VP, a marginal Allied victory. The heavy losses suffered by the unlucky Serbs outweighing the capture of Lemberg and the strategic Carpathian pass.




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Paul
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After doing some digging last night and giving my game some thought I do think there is something a bit off with the supply rules in Serbia/Galicia--more specifically the rail rules. In the game the player can only use the rails in his/her own country for movement and supply.

This makes it impossible for the Russians to reach the great AH fortress of Premsyl as they did historically. Units of the Russian 3rd Army, approaching from the east did this.

The Russians captured a huge amount of rolling stock and 30 working locomotives when they captured Lemberg, and Russian sources point out that the building of field railrays stopped due to this easing the supply problems. I think the Russian player probably should be able to use the rail line to Lemberg for supply (not movement) a certain number of turns after its captured. I need to give this some thought.
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Kim Meints
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Wow, 2 Allied marginal wins in those two sessions

Like the Lemburg idea
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Paul
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jackiesavon wrote:
Wow, 2 Allied marginal wins in those two sessions

Like the Lemburg idea


Hi Kim,

It's really a necessity. If you look at the AAR pictures you'll see the Russian 3rd Army in a mass in the center of the map. That's as far as they can go with the rules as is. Being able to trace supply as far as Lemberg via rail would make perfect sense for their operations historically as well. Right now there's a hole in the middle of the map that the AH player can retreat into and not be touched.
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Kim Meints
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The simple Lemberg fix also solves more detailed house rules of rail conversion/EB units repairing the rail lines and only on the double track line also a good thing(simple fix)
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Paul
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jackiesavon wrote:
The simple Lemberg fix also solves more detailed house rules of rail conversion/EB units repairing the rail lines and only on the double track line also a good thing(simple fix)


Agreed. They used AH rolling stock on standard western gauge lines. It would also add a big incentive for the AH player to try and hold onto Lemberg--it was a critical rail center--beyond a simple VP criterion.
 
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