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Subject: The war of the five daimyo rss

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David O'Neil
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As the sun rose over the divided realms of Sengoku Japan, the five daimyo cast their eyes jealously over each other's provinces and armies. At the end of just two years of fierce campaigning, one of them would be named Shogun of all Japan--and the rest his unwilling subjects.

These were the five daimyo:

Petersu, the Red Daimyo, builder and culture-bringer
Danimoto, the Black Daimyo, lord of ninjas
Annjoraishi, the Yellow Daimyo, peace-lover and grower of rice
Davekuza, the Purple Daimyo, seeker of vengeance
Marksushi, the Blue Daimyo, the upstart

The first year began in an orgy of blood as Danimoto sent his murderous ninjas into two peaceful provinces of Davekuza, who had shown him no malice. The provinces fell, while the few surviving ninjas oppressed their new subjects mercilessly. A thirst for vengeance burned in Davekuza's heart, and he vowed secretly that he would rescue the nation from the tyranny of the Black Daimyo.

Meanwhile, Marksushi took advantage of the weakness developing along Danimoto's flank and his provinces multiplied rapidly. On the other side of Japan, Petersu began gathering his armies in secret, taking no part in the bloody struggles being waged around him, while Annejoraishi, the great mother of samurai, cultivated a great harvest of rice for the feasting of her people.

At the end of the year only the Blue Daimyo could not feed his people--due to the rapid rate of his expansion. He quickly and mercilessly quelled the brewing rebellion, but all eyes soon looked with wonder at the growing reach of his armies. And the veteran daimyo were ashamed, for Marksushi had never before led troops to battle.

In council Davekuza stood up before them all and delivered a mighty speech: "Honorable daimyo, lords of Japan and keepers of the traditions of our ancestors, shall we allow this upstart, the fatherless Blue Daimyo, to dishonor us on the field of battle? Shall we allow Marksushi to claim the title of Shogun, who starves and murders the freedom-loving people of Japan? I beseech you, let it not be so."

Davekuza thus spoke, but he had not forgotten the crimes of the Black Daimyo, whose ninjas had wrought such ruin against him. And unbeknownst to all, there was great joy in the heart of Petersu, the Red Daimyo, for his power was growing in secret.

The second year brought horrific battle against Marksushi, who found his newly developed provinces falling one by one to the Black Daimyo's ninjas. Davekuza watched happily as Danimoto thus spent the blood of his armies, then struck the fatal blow of vengeance against his rear, seizing the castles that had so recently been built under the rule of the Blue Daimyo. Petersu, meanwhile, began his great building campaign, filling his provinces with castles, temples, and theaters, all to the happiness of his subjects. The other daimyo looked with envy on these rich provinces, but alas, the Red Daimyo's power had become too strong and they could not be taken.

As the year came to an end, only the Purple Daimyo had failed to feed his people. While he was slaking his thirst for vengeance against Danimoto, he had ruthlessly exploited his people, bringing all his resources to bear in that one single-minded puruit--but it had not been in vain. Danimoto's once strong empire lay in complete ruin, and in his eyes there was repentance for his crimes against the Purple Daimyo. Meanwhile, Marksushi's armies had suffered minor losses, and his early military victories could not match the cultural expansion of Petersu.

As the seats of empire shook across the land, Annjoraishi developed many new rice recipes to feed her provinces, including fried rice, rice pudding, condoleeza rice, and rice-a-roni. The people rejoiced--and were fattened.

The dust cleared from the battlefields, and only one man was still standing. The Red Daimyo had been victorius! The culture-bringer Petersu was elected Shogun and Lord of all Japan. The people rejoiced, for he had brought them great wealth, and his buildings stood long past the Sengoku period as a testament to the beneficience of the quiet warlord, who had seized a peaceful victory while the other daimyo wrecklessly spilled the blood of their samurai in pursuit of vain ambition.

But the other daimyo have not given up. In secret they are raising their armies again to see who will next be named the Shogun of all Japan...
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J. Random Human
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bartender13 wrote:
Ingenious.

This is the best description of a game session I've ever seen. It follows both the Shogun theme as well as the actual game play very well. My wife and I could easily visualize the various moves and strategy of all the players. This is better than all of the reviews I've read for Shogun thus far. Simply Amazing!

Favorite paragraph:

"As the seats of empire shook across the land, Annjoraishi developed many new rice recipes to feed her provinces, including fried rice, rice pudding, condoleeza rice, and rice-a-roni. The people rejoiced--and were fattened." laugh



You might want to take a look at http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/24697, which is the session report that probably inspired it.
 
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David O'Neil
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John: Thanks for the compliments. I'm glad you and your wife enjoyed my report. This was my first real contribution to BGG and I was hoping fellow geeks would like it.

Random: I hadn't seen that particular session you were refering to (I don't know a thing about Amun-Re, actually), but I think it's quite common for people to invent stories around the games they play. I can remember my friends and I doing that as far back as high school, and from what I've seen it's fairly common for session reports here on BGG. Anyway, I don't think you were trying to be insulting, but it's not necessary to assume direct influence between two people's reports just because there might be a similarity.
 
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J. Random Human
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psyche_athanatos wrote:

Random: I hadn't seen that particular session you were refering to (I don't know a thing about Amun-Re, actually), but I think it's quite common for people to invent stories around the games they play. I can remember my friends and I doing that as far back as high school, and from what I've seen it's fairly common for session reports here on BGG. Anyway, I don't think you were trying to be insulting, but it's not necessary to assume direct influence between two people's reports just because there might be a similarity.


Joe Gola's Amun-Re session is rather (in)famous on this site, so I thought (erroneously, it would seem) that you'd read it. No insult was intended, but even if there had been influence, what of it? Your session report was still very good.
 
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David O'Neil
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I'm sorry I took offence. I thought (erroneously on my part, too) that you were suggesting that my report was completely unoriginal. But you are right that influence is nothing to be ashamed of.

I read this recently:

"Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different. The good poet welds his theft into a whole of feeling which is unique, utterly different from that from which it was torn; the bad poet throws it into something which has no cohesion. A good poet will usually borrow from authors remote in time, or alien in language, or diverse in interest. Chapman borrowed from Seneca; Shakespeare and Webster from Montaigne." -T. S. Eliot (or so he claims)
 
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