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Subject: Games to try and form bond between mother and adopted child rss

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Ben Blanton
United States
Tallahassee
Florida
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A friend of mine is a child and family therapist working with them to build trusting and healthy relationships. She comes up with activities, uses various tools and tries to think outside the box.

She's working on fostering an attachment between an adopted 13yo and her new mother. She was coming up with ways to form a bond. She thought playing a board game together is a great way to form this bond. Knowing I was an avid board gamer she asked for suggestions. I did and, thinking this was a great tool, also thought about reaching out to the community here at BGG to get as many suggestions to her as I could.

The child has limited reading ability, so something easy. Also, We're thinking co-op at this time.

Thank you in advance for your suggestions.
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R.J.
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Citrus Heights
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While not a co-op, I think Patchwork may be good here... an approachable theme, no reading (aside from numbers).
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Ken Lewis
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Cumming
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(also not co-ops, but...)What about something like Blokus, Tsuro, Ingenious, or maybe even games like Battle Sheep and Hey, That's My Fish?

The mother could "throw the game" if needed to make it more enjoyable. I have done it enough times with my kids.
 
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Everett
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Presque Isle
Maine
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Takenoko?
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Laura Blachek
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charlotte hall
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Mr_Skyfish wrote:
A friend of mine is a child and family therapist working with them to build trusting and healthy relationships. She comes up with activities, uses various tools and tries to think outside the box.

She's working on fostering an attachment between an adopted 13yo and her new mother. She was coming up with ways to form a bond. She thought playing a board game together is a great way to form this bond. Knowing I was an avid board gamer she asked for suggestions. I did and, thinking this was a great tool, also thought about reaching out to the community here at BGG to get as many suggestions to her as I could.

The child has limited reading ability, so something easy. Also, We're thinking co-op at this time.

Thank you in advance for your suggestions.


Forbidden island comes to mind... It should be easy to find, coop, not too complicated, and while the tiles each have names on them, you can also identify them by the artwork.
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Laura Blachek
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charlotte hall
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Also, what about Escape: The Curse of the Temple. I havent actually played it, so maybe i am unaware of reading requirements, but i wonder if the real time dice rolling would help break the ice.

Thoughts from someone with more experience on this game?
 
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Eric Matthews
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Forbidden Desert too-- a coop similar and in the same series as Forbidden Island.
The reading in the actual game is limited/almost non-existent. There is are written descriptions of the character abilities and a few cards, but these are merely reminders of what things do and since they come up every game most kids would have them virtually memorized by the second play of having someone remind them (the water carrier can give water, etc). And in a coop like this reminding someone of even what their own character does is common and natural anyway.

Hanabi is a solid and challenging coop that is totally abstract (absolutely no reading other than the directions) so if this kid is gets stressed at even seeing some words a game, Hanabi could be a good choice to ease the kid into gaming without an intimidating first impression.

Lots of classics like dominoes and various card games can work too.
Finding a theme that matches this kids interests minght really be the thing that breaks from an issue with reading or whatever.

E
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Mike

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With a 13 year old that can't read that well try Ghost Fightin' Treasure Hunters. I saw it had finally been released in the states and Target is carrying it in store. It is a cooperative children's game but not really childish. It won the Kinderspiel in 2014.

Link to the game at Target. http://www.target.com/p/ghost-fightin-treasure-hunters-game/...
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Brian Franzman
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Perhaps dexterity games would go over well with a non-reader? And they should be very easy for mom to "throw" if she chooses.

Loopin' Chewie
Jenga
Garbage Day!
PitchCar
Crokinole
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Eric Pullen

Amarillo
Texas
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+1 Hanabi
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Marina SC
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Vaughan
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There may be similar products out there, but The Empathy Toy popped into my head because I saw it selling on a site recently:
http://twentyonetoys.com/pages/empathy-toy

It's co-operative, does not require any reading, and is all about promoting communication.
 
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John Breckenridge
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Richmond
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Flash Point: Fire Rescue - if you play the beginner game without the role cards, there's no reading needed at all.
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Liam
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+1 Forbidden Island
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Geoffrey Burrell
United States
Cedar Rapids
Iowa
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Shadowrun: Crossfire or Galaxy Defenders. Both are co-ops.
 
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Once Upon a Time: The Storytelling Card Game
 
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Mr_Skyfish wrote:
She was coming up with ways to form a bond. She thought playing a board game together is a great way to form this bond.
The game doesn't matter; the time spent together does.

That said, go to a game store and let the child choose whatever s/he wants. Whatever investment the child has in the game (even if it is only liking the picture on the box) is going to engender more investment on the child's part than any suggestion the parent makes.
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A friend of mine has several kids, including some adopted (at about age 9, so a bit younger than your friend's case, but still considered "older child" adoptions) and their family are largely avid boardgamers. They've had a lot of luck with co-ops. Forbidden Desert/Island were the biggest hits, although Flash Point and Pandemic come out fairly regularly. They've also had a lot of luck with low-pressure, silly/fun stuff that can be played with minimal head-to-head competition, although unfortunately everything that springs to mind (e.g. Sushi Go) works better in groups of more than 2.

Seconding the suggestion to have something that's appealing to the young lady though. As your friend the therapist is no doubt aware, it's not going to make a particle of difference how highly rated the game is if the 13yo isn't interested in it. Is there any way they could borrow, say, 6-10 of the games suggested in this thread from you or another friend or the local FLGS? Gives some options for mom and daughter to pick from, but less overwhelming than having an entire store's worth of games.
 
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Samo Oleami
Slovenia
Ljubljana
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party games and kids games.

As the desire is to create a sort of trust or emotional bond, I'd go with party games
Celebrities (public domain version of Time's Up! - you create your own cards, so some reading required). Good thing about this game - encourages listening (needs 4 players though. two players isn't a competitive game, but can be done just for fun)
Dixit - figure out how people think + nice pictures
Rory's Story Cubes - not sure for this particular couple of mother/adopted kid, but should be in therapist's arsenal (maybe 2 or 3 sets, for creative storytelling, or just any kind of storytelling)

cooperative games - Forbidden Island is too complex for kids at our workshops (8 to 16 y.o. nongamer kids with some problems at school). Can be played with an adult driving the game, but maybe find something else.
We have this one - Hoot Owl Hoot!.
Check also this year's Kinderspiel des Jahre's nominees - Leo seems interesting.

dexterity games - they're simple and look neat
Rhino Hero
(also Animal upon Animal - looks like a small kids game and Catch a Falling Star - with kids it's love it or hate game for unknown reason)

Speed games - they're more for doing something together than building trust, but maybe that happens later:
- Dobble/Spot it! (good for 2)
- pick a pig/dog/something - with a storytelling variant!

The Enchanted Tower - a kid's game that sort of tells a story and it's a tiny bit psychological.

(With kids games it's like this - tweens of certain age won't be willing to play them ("too childish") but in mid-late teens this wasn't an issue any more)
 
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CARL SKUTSCH
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New York
New York
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If it's coop I echo Forbidden Island. If that works you can work up to Forbidden Desert.

For an easy pretty game there's Splendor.

I love the idea of Hive. Sure, it's competitive, but no text, and so pretty.



 
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Kevin D.
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the Oniverse games might be worth a look. They tend to have 2-player cooperative variants, or you could just play the solo mode with a partner. The artwork is etherial but full of emotion and could be a good talking point.

Mysterium maybe?
 
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Ben Blanton
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Tallahassee
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I can't thank you all enough for the suggestions! I've sent my friend the link to this thread and she's stoked to read up.

 
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