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Subject: About a dozen rule questions for 1829 Mainline rss

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Rance Leon
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By the way: Does anyone know of an official rules site for this game or whether the game designer answers questions?

1) Are owners of shares to a railroad allowed to sell every last share thereby making a company completely unowned? If so, what happens in that case?

2) When a dividend is paid out for a train run, what happens to the amount earned that exceeds the payout to shareholders when not all shares are owned? Does this amount go to the company treasury or is it lost?

3) There is no mention in the rulebook of the labels 'Midland', 'LNWR', and 'GWR' on hexes R14, U17 and V18 respectively. Does these labels indicate, as in the game 1825, that those companies must lay the first yellow tiles in those hexes (through any company may upgrade them later)? Was the rule left out of the rulebook or were the labels unintentionally left on the mapboard?

4) Does it cost £40 to place a yellow tile on Grimsby (hex O19)? Practically, track built on that place would not be crossing a river as represented on this gameboard.

5) Regarding Section 9, Part C of the yellow tile placement table: Tiles 2 and 114 are double-station town tiles with sharp curves. Does laying one of these tiles immediately end the company's tile laying stage 1) if the sharp curve is utilized in the intentional line connected to the company's base?, and, 2) if the sharp curve is utilized on the incidental (unconnected) track?

6) How are earnings determined when only variable value cities are counted in a train run? Note that it is possible for Glasgow and York to be connected directly and counted in a 2 Train run. Note that it is possible for such cities to be the only ones counted in an express train run.

7) A train runs from Crewe through Llandudho to Holyhead. The first two cities count as 10 points each. Holyhead then counts as 10 minus 20. Is its value then zero in this case?

8) Initial Share purchase (page 4): There seems to be a potential conflict with the 2nd sentence of the 4th paragraph in Section 4 with the 1st sentence of Section 5 on the same page. The sentence in Section 4 indicates either a Director's share (worth only 2 shares) or either three ordinary shares will float (form/start up) a company. However, the first sentence in Section 5 clearly indicates three shares must be bought. Apparently, in any case, a company will form under 30% ownership. But does the Director's share alone also start up a company?

9) Share dealing rounds (Section 19, page 13, 2nd paragraph): The rule states "The player on the left of the last player to deal receives the Priority Deal card ...". From my reading of the rules, there is only one deal in the game--at the beginning of the initial share purchase phase. Should this sentence read "The player on the left of the last player to make a purchase receives the Priority Deal card ..."? (This change would seem logical and in step with other 18XX games.)

10) Regarding the Mulligan option: Does a player outright own all shares in the new set of cards if exchanging his current set of cards for the new set? Or, are some of the cards in the new set considered "face-down" cards in the personal retained pile? How would you determine which cards received from the Mulligan pile are owned or not owned?

11) My bank money equaled £19,995. Should it have been an even £20,000?

Comments:

1) There is a white token supplied in the game. Obviously, there is an "operating round/share round" track that was not printed on the board that ought to be (as in some other 18XX games).

2) In Mainline, the token moves up the SPI table when dividends are equal to or more than 50% of the current share price (Section 17, 2nd paragraph). However, in the related 1825 games, the token moves up only if more than 50% of the current share price. Is this difference intentional on the part of the game designer? It actually causes a difference with twelve "current price" values (100, 160, 180, 280, 300, 320, 340, 360, 380, 400, 420, and 440). [I use a ready-reference chart for quickly determining the SPI token move.]
 
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Mark Wright
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Here are some answers I remember

1) In this cae a director is appointed to run the company, I have seen this situation where a company has no money and no train. The rules then effectively give it a train and the company pays it off. At this stage the company is usually very cheap with a new train a much better proposition.

2) The money is lost - if it goes to the companies they early companies get too rich.

3) I think these are protected hexes that only the company can lay to ensure they can get out of their start position.

4) Yes as the river croses from one side of the hex to another.

6) I think you assume a base value of nought for the other city and apply the two values as per the rules.

7) Value is 0

8) I think it is 30%, so the directors and one other certificate it might be intermating

9) I think you are right, he might have used the word deal as in conduct a transaction.

10) I would presume you mulligan when you see you shares. You then choose to play with the mulligan hand and buy the shares in the normal way around the table.

11) Probably

Comment 1) Yes I think it was meant to be a turn marker.
Comment 2) I think we played it as is.

These are my guess answers having no rule book with me and only played it three times so it might not be gospel.

regards


 
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Chris Farrell
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hellium wrote:
Here are some answers I remember

...

2) The money is lost - if it goes to the companies they early companies get too rich.

...



I pretty confident that this is the correct answer, but there is some genuine ambiguity in the rulebook as to how to play it.

There are two sides to the story, though. Early companies that sell out all their stock raise plenty of cash in their treasury and are in a very strong position. Early companies that don't sell much stock can get really hamstrung for cash, and if the stock isn't bought because it simply isn't available (someone is sitting on it in their private pool, unfortunate timing in the card flow), then companies that don't sell through their initial offering can get really hurt and have a hard time generating enough money to grow.

I think if you allowed companies to retain dividends for *unsold* stock (i.e., still in the initial offering, and not in the bank pool), it actually might help balance the game a little bit. Early companies that only manage to sell 30-40% of their stock wouldn't be in such a poor position compared to companies that sell 80-100%, and who are therefore flush with cash.

It's the same thing that happens sort of in 1856, where you can float companies with very few shares outstanding, but only get cash for sold shares. In 1856, companies that sell out early are very strong. But in 1856, companies that *don't* get bought heavily still have options to capitalize: the director can "flip" a few shares, or the companies can take out loans. These options are not generally available to companies in 1829 Mainline.
 
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