Recommend
32 
 Thumb up
 Hide
4 Posts

Vikings» Forums » Reviews

Subject: Wikinger rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
David Hunter
United Kingdom
Newcastle-under-Lyme
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmb
Well since no one else has reviewed this yet I thought I would give it a go. Be gentle its my first review... I should also add that I've thus far only played two player games and faked (ie two people playing two players each) four player games.

The short version:
Imagine a cross breed between Carcassonne and Oceania (Perhaps Entdecker but I haven't played that). Add in bidding for which land and Veeple (Viking Meeple) you get with a nifty wheel system to determine the value of each purchase. Then add in two versions of the game: basic & advanced, each with their own charm and you get Wikinger.

Personally I think it is a great game, I'd rate the basic game at an 8 and the advanced game at a 9. If I had one complaint it would be that the game is a bit short, only 6 turns, only three of which do significant scoring... Although it does play within 60 minutes, I could do with up to 4 more turns. I do wonder if this may have been intentional to allow for an easy expansion to be released should this take off.

The long version:

Theme: Well Vikings, but not your hacking slashing kind of Viking, instead peace loving island settling Vikings. You're only chance to get your axe on, is in defence of your lands so if you are keen on Viking themed games for the mayhem this may not be for you. (Although there can be considerable indirect intra-player argy-bargy) On the whole the theme suits the game and doesn't feel entirely painted on.

Components:
Fairly nice in a standardly Euro game kind of way. Nice wooden pieces, especially the Veeple who do really look like Carcassonne Meeple with added horns. The main board is a glorified score track/tile holder/wheel/visual rules explainer, which is at least efficient. The tiles are of reasonable quality, and the player boards are are likewise both self explanatory and good quality. Each player has their own board, and there is no interaction between player's boards, its like Puerto Rico in this way.
Main Board


Player Board


There are 6 types of Veeple:
Sailors (Grey): These are used for ferrying around your Veeple.
Warriors (Black): These ward off Viking Raiders.
Nobleman (Red): Score 2 VP in major scoring rounds.
Scouts (Green): Score one VP and one VP each for having a Goldsmith and a Fisherman below them in major scoring rounds.
Goldsmith (Yellow): Scores 3 Gold in every scoring round.
Fishermen (Blue): Only score in end game, then you need 1 fisherman to support every 5 Veeple you have, for each you can't feed you lose one VP for each you are oversupplied by gain two VP.
There are 13 of each Veeple.

There are four types of basic land tiles:
Starting tiles: These start islands (On the picture above of the main board the tile positioned at 0 on the wheel is a starting tile)
Middle Tiles: These continue existing islands (On the picture above of the main board the tile positioned at 3 on the wheel is a middle tile)
End Tiles: These end islands (On the picture above of the main board the tile positioned at 1 on the wheel is an end tile)
Viking Ships: These threaten Veeple on Islands below them depending on the colour of the ship's sail and generate gold or VP when they are warded off by a Warrior. (On the picture above of the main board the tile positioned at 11 on the wheel is a Viking Ship)

Gameplay:

I'm not going to go through the rules in depth here instead I'm just going to give a quick summary:
1. The game consists of six turns, three minor scoring turns and three major scoring turns.
2. At the start of each round is an offer which consists of 12 land tiles and 12 Veeples: In the basic game these are placed with each drawn island tile from 0 upwards around the Wheel and the Viking Ships are placed from 11 downwards. The Veeples are placed starting from 0 with all blue, then yellow, then green, then red, then black, then grey. In the advanced game the tiles are placed as above but one extra Veeple is drawn and the starting player discards one Veeple from the offer of their choice, they then pick one colour and place that colour starting at 11, the next player then picks another colour and places that next to the placed pieces and so on.
3. Players begin with 10 VP and 30, 25 or 20 Gold respectively if there are 2, 3 or 4 players. You also begin with one opening island tile.
4. The starting player chooses which of the 12 offers they want and pays the price indicated by the wheel in gold for that particular tile and Veeple combination (ie on the main board picture for 2 gold you would get a starting island tile and a blue Veeple for 3 gold a middle island tile and a yellow Veeple).
5. The next player chooses and purchases an offer and so on.
6. If a player wants to purchase something they can't afford they can trade victory points for gold at a 1 to 1 ratio. You are never forced to do this.
7. If the Veeple next the zero is the only Veeple of it's colour left on the board then that Veeple and tile can be 'bought' for free.
8. If the player doesn't have enough gold to purchase a tile then they may take the tile next to the zero for free.
9. If the tile next to the zero is taken then the wheel rotates around in a clockwise direction until there is a tile facing the zero again, effectively decreasing the price of the other options.

Once a tile and Veeple have been bought they are then placed on the player's board. The tile has to be placed so that at least one side adjoins another island tile or the player board and so that land joins land and sea joins sea. If the tile cannot be placed it is discarded. The land can be placed in any of the five (warrior, Noble, Scout, Goldsmith, Fisherman) rows and if the Veeple is of the type of the row the land is placed in then the Veeple may be placed straight on to the island. If not then the Veeple is placed on the sailor in the top left corner of the player board and may be placed using Sailors in later turns. If a Viking Ship is bought it must be placed in the top row of the Player board and the first three must fill the first three columns, although you may place them in any order. (ie you could go column 3 then column 1 then 2 if you wished.)

Scoring:

Viking Ships threaten the column below them down to the level of the colour of their sail (ie red sail threatens down to and including nobles, blue sails threaten down to and including fisherman) unless there is a warrior directly below them warding them off. (As in the second column of the player board shown above) If a veeple is threatened it doesn't score.

In minor rounds (1st, 3rd & 5th) only goldsmiths score and you get 3 gold pieces for each non-threatened goldsmith.

In the major rounds (2nd, 4th & 6th) each non-threatened figure scores and you get:
Nobleman (Red): Score 2 VP.
Scouts (Green): Score one VP and one VP each for having a Goldsmith and a Fisherman below them in.
Goldsmith (Yellow): Scores 3 Gold.
If you have a Warrior warding off a Viking Ship you get whatever is on that ship ie either VP or Gold.

At the being of a major round shipping happens. In the Basic game: for each Sailor you have you may either move all of one particular colour Veeples onto available appropriate island spaces or one of each colour Veeple onto available appropriate island spaces. Each Sailor used to ship is then discarded. In the final round you must use sailors to ship if you can. In the Advanced game each sailor can only ship one figure unless you have a boat card, in which case the above rules apply.

At the end of the final round scoring you have the end game scoring:
1. For each unprotected Viking Ship subtract the gold/VP from your gold/VP.
2. For every five gold get one VP.
3. Whoever has the most remaining Sailors gets 10 points
4. Whoever has the most completed Islands gets 7 points
5. Whoever has the Longest completed Island gets 5 Points
6. For every five Veeple you need one Fisherman, if you are under-supplied lose one VP for each Veeple you can't feed. If you are over-supplied gain 2 VP for each Veeple

The Advanced Game:
Most of the changes have already been outlined above, the other significant change is the introduction of special tiles which you get if you buy the most expensive (unless you pay zero) tile. These tiles, predictably allow you to stream line your strategy by giving advantages to different sorts of Veeples etc.

How the game plays obviously changes with the number of players. There is surprising depth in the two player game, in part because so much is predictable, that long term strategies become easy to plan out. More players equals more chaos which has its own special charm though.

In general the strategy revolves around deciding which tile/Veeple will benefit you most, while giving the least away to your opponents. There have been some suggestions that it is a bit dry and that the best choice is obvious. I suspect it merely seems obvious, with six different types of Veeples and three different possible lands there are several trade offs to consider. It is crucial to remember that there are only 13 of each Veeple, so each purchase doesn't just give you one it also denies your opponents something. However you will also need to keep in mind how much it costs, where it will go and whether you will be able to place the Veeple immediately. The advanced game adds further depth since it supports different strategies, chokes up the easy availability of transport and encourages over-spending...

On the whole this is a great little game, quick to play but with considerable depth.


(Thanks to Steve McKeogh whose rules translation I have relied on)
7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jay Maszek
United States
Chicago
Illinois
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
First of all I just have to say, this was one of the best reviews I’ve read, very clear and concise. The only thing I had a problem following was, I thought the player board was community. So from that point I was trying to determine, how the pieces placed where going to be distinguish, but then I realized that’d been impossible and never work.

I just had a question about the tiles. Is there any real significance to purchasing one tile over the other; rather is one more important than the other; or is there an equal opportunity with each tile in it’s own. I’m sure there’s no benefit to monopolizing one section other than burning your opponents. I guess it depends on your strategy?

-Maszek
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Hunter
United Kingdom
Newcastle-under-Lyme
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmb
maszek wrote:
First of all I just have to say, this was one of the best reviews I’ve read, very clear and concise.

Cheers
maszek wrote:

The only thing I had a problem following was, I thought the player board was community. So from that point I was trying to determine, how the pieces placed where going to be distinguish, but then I realized that’d been impossible and never work.


Right, I'll edit it to make it clear that each individual has their own playing board and there is no interaction in terms of your player boards.

maszek wrote:

I just had a question about the tiles. Is there any real significance to purchasing one tile over the other; rather is one more important than the other; or is there an equal opportunity with each tile in it’s own. I’m sure there’s no benefit to monopolizing one section other than burning your opponents. I guess it depends on your strategy?

Its a good question, when we first read the rules we misunderstood them and prioritised starting island tiles over others. Now I guess it does mostly depend on strategy. I guess I would prefer middle sections and beginning sections over end sections since they are easiest to place.

Cheers
David

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jay Maszek
United States
Chicago
Illinois
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Hey thanks for the reply. I’m really interested in this game. Hopefully I can grab a copy soon.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.