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Subject: Does it matter what edition of Diplomacy I get? rss

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Wes Nott
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Just like the title says: Does it really matter what edition I get of Diplomacy? Have there even been any rules changes or other changes (mechanics?) that might make one edition better than the other? Or has Diplomacy pretty much been the same since day 1?

I'm guessing the only real deciding factor on which edition i get will be based on how much money I want to spend and which graphics/artwork I prefer.

Thanks!
 
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Nate Merchant
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Lagduf wrote:
Just like the title says: Does it really matter what edition I get of Diplomacy? Have there even been any rules changes or other changes (mechanics?) that might make one edition better than the other? Or has Diplomacy pretty much been the same since day 1?

I'm guessing the only real deciding factor on which edition i get will be based on how much money I want to spend and which graphics/artwork I prefer.

Thanks!


No, it really doesn't matter at this point. But honestly, no set I'm awqare of should be very expensive at this point. It's not like there's a $300 Deluxe Edition somewhere. Check the BGG marketplace or Ebay, and you should do fine.
 
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Philip Thomas
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There have been no rules changes to the main game that I am aware of, it is just a question of component quality.

Later editions changed the rules for playing with less than 7 players: In older editions you got rid of countries entirely, starting with Turkey (no pieces could move into Turkey in a game with 6 players or less). In more modern editions non-playing countries remain part of the map and start with units in place (which don't move during the game but make it a bit more difficult to conquer it), and the first country to not have a player is Italy. Also the modern rules say when you get to 4 players you can play two countries each (except for one player who plays just England, which is a pretty strange arrangement...)

The modern edition also has a 2-player variant, but its only worth playing to get a better grasp of the mechanics.

I think the example of play may have changed too.

 
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Fraser
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Back in the days when there were less maps we played every map back to back
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Ooh a little higher, now a bit to the left, a little more, a little more, just a bit more. Oooh yes, that's the spot!
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Philip Thomas wrote:
The modern edition also has a 2-player variant, but its only worth playing to get a better grasp of the mechanics.


What's your definition of "modern" Philip? My edition which dates back to the mid 70s has two player rules, I am not entirely sure I would call my set modern meeple

The rules are available here http://www.diplomacy-archive.com/diplomacy_rules.htm

There's quite a few to pick from
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You also realize there is Colonial Diplomacy, right? But that is played on a map of Asia.

As far as standard Diplomacy, I would recommend the large-box Avalon Hill edition (the one with metal pieces). I don't recommend it because of the pieces, however, but because of the rules, which are much more readable and filled with illustrations. On the other hand, those rules are available here:

http://www.hasbro.com/common/instruct/Diplomacy.PDF

so the point is probably moot.

Don't get the above edition mixed up with the older Deluxe Avalon Hill edition (which came in the same size box as Colonial Diplomacy).

Note that there are at least two different small-box Avalon Hill editions as well. Personally I don't like the one with plastic pieces. Wood is much nicer.

 
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Philip Thomas
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Quote:
What's your definition of "modern" Philip? My edition which dates back to the mid 70s has two player rules, I am not entirely sure I would call my set modern


Well, by modern I really mean more recent than the old edition I have. Which I guess dates back to the 60s or thereabouts.
 
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Marty M
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As has been already said, Diplomacy has remained unchanged - any edition will do. Regarding Colonial Diplomacy, I have found this and any other (unpublished) variants to be much poorer than the original.

I hope you enjoy Diplomacy - it is unique and brilliant.
 
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Brian Newman
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Philip Thomas wrote:
There have been no rules changes to the main game that I am aware of, it is just a question of component quality.

Later editions changed the rules for playing with less than 7 players: In older editions you got rid of countries entirely, starting with Turkey (no pieces could move into Turkey in a game with 6 players or less). In more modern editions non-playing countries remain part of the map and start with units in place (which don't move during the game but make it a bit more difficult to conquer it), and the first country to not have a player is Italy. Also the modern rules say when you get to 4 players you can play two countries each (except for one player who plays just England, which is a pretty strange arrangement...)

The modern edition also has a 2-player variant, but its only worth playing to get a better grasp of the mechanics.

I think the example of play may have changed too.



Actually, there were some changes from the original 1953 edition to what is the current edition (which I think started in 1958). The spaces on the board were somewhat different, and the convoy rules were different.
 
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C Lloyd
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Even if the rules have been slightly modified, you can always choose which rule set you want to use. That said, I don't think there are many differences.

I'd say the choice is purely personal taste concerning the components. I own a 1980s version (green map, ugly plastic pieces). Bought the last AH/Hasbro edition, which has a nice map (IMO) and cool metal pieces. Looks great, but the pieces have thin bases and easily fall over. Good luck with your decision.
 
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True Blue Jon
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Yes, get the one with wooden pieces. It makes showing the moves much easier.
 
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Wes Nott
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Thanks for the help everyone, i'll probably get one of older editions (70s) as the new AH/Hasbro edition is too costly for my tastes (just like the AH/Hasbro edition of Acquire...)
 
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Marty M
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While you're waiting to get your copy, I would recommend reading the late Richard Sharp's excellently written introduction to Diplomacy. It was written (and actually published as a book) in the 1970s - it's a bit out of date in that it talks about postal play rather than PBEM - but it is a great introduction to the game and should whet your appetite.

It is available free at the following link:-

http://www.diplomacy-archive.com/god.htm
 
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