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Mansions of Madness: Second Edition» Forums » General

Subject: Suitable for Families? rss

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Mr. Blue
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Other than a couple vague comments, I haven't been able to locate any discussion about how intense the content of the game is, and whether it would be suitable for families or not. Reading the game descriptions, it seems that this game is more creepy and atmospheric than a true "horror" game. Would this be o.k. with pre-teens? If it's not overly intense (scare factor, not game intensity), my 12 yr. old daughter might enjoy playing this.
 
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Magic Pink
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I'd play it with anyone 10+

but that's me
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Drake Coker
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It's likely to be fine for you. One way you can tell for sure is to download the free app and pretend to play it yourself to see what it is like. While you can't play the game completely without the physical components, you can "just pretend" your way through a scenario to see how it all feels.
 
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Grant Holzhauer
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Chandler
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Who knew Euro games could be thematic?
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The combat and horror check descriptions can be very violent/bloody/gruesome in their descriptions. Personally, I would treat this as a heavy PG-13 movie from a parenting perspective.
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Erik Isch
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Just depends on the family and their standards. It is H.P. Lovecraft, if your a fan of his books and are okay with that then you will love this game like I do. If you have no idea what I am talking about. Then game has spells, monster and cultist twist in the stories. It can be intense somr times. Hope this helps.
 
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Joshua Delahunty
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mrblueesq wrote:
Other than a couple vague comments, I haven't been able to locate any discussion about how intense the content of the game is, and whether it would be suitable for families or not. Reading the game descriptions, it seems that this game is more creepy and atmospheric than a true "horror" game. Would this be o.k. with pre-teens? If it's not overly intense (scare factor, not game intensity), my 12 yr. old daughter might enjoy playing this.


This is the creepiest mythos event I can think of off-hand...


Like running ink, your skin and flesh start to melt off ([strength]; 2).

Pass: The process can be slowly reversed, until it stops altogether.
Suffer 1 facedown Horror.

Fail: The muscle pulls back to reveal the white curve of bone.
Suffer 2 Damage, and each other investigator in range suffers 2 Horror
([will] negates).


HTH
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Bryce K. Nielsen
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Elk Ridge
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I've played with my 12 yr old daughter, and there's nothing overtly graphic in the game, you have to use your imagination for the most part. She's done well with it.

-shnar
 
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Jeff Beck
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My 9 and 12yo love it. There is far more graphic stuff on Tom and Jerry than this. If you control the app then you can put whatever kind of twist on the language used you like.
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Matt E.

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Ran into a horror check where the witch held up a cat, then drew a blade across its neck, draining the blood into a chalice which she then drank from.

I'm paraphrasing and not doing it justice.
 
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Christopher
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If I were playing this with a kid I'd handle the app like a DM in an RPG and not read the more gruesome descriptions.
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Christian Lindberg
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As it is it is not suitable for children under 15 years due to graphic violence descriptions but, if you control the app you can make it what you want.
 
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mrblueesq wrote:
Other than a couple vague comments, I haven't been able to locate any discussion about how intense the content of the game is, and whether it would be suitable for families or not. Reading the game descriptions, it seems that this game is more creepy and atmospheric than a true "horror" game. Would this be o.k. with pre-teens? If it's not overly intense (scare factor, not game intensity), my 12 yr. old daughter might enjoy playing this.


Honestly, I've seen far more gory/horrific images in PG-13 movies than in this game. If you'd be okay with your daughter watching a PG-13 movie, you're probably fine. There are some gory descriptions in the combat flavor text, but nothing you actually seen on-screen.

Overall the game is more atmospherically scary; the music, sound effects, and intensity of the situation are what creates the horror experience. I wouldn't call it inappropriate for a soon-to-be teenager.

Hope that helps!
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Rick Baptist
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It's not like telling your 10-year-old to read Lovecraft (which I would probably not recommend) but it is immersive and it will give the kids a little scare. My 10 and 12-year-old had a lot of fun with it, but you could tell they got the creeps a couple times.

It really depends on your kids!
 
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Chris Beesley
Ireland
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We have played both the 1st and 2nd edition in our family games night. As a family we really love the game.
I have five sons, four of which are old enough to play board games (the youngest only being two). Surprisingly i find that the younger ones, aged 7 and 11 get into the theme much more than the teenagers (14 and 17).

There is a horror element to the game but personally i don't find it too intense and the context of the game is such that it feels more fiction/fantasy than real life. It really does have that old fashioned lovelace-esque quality to it which puts it firmly back in the "olden days". I think that old fashioned feeling makes the difference in children's minds and kids aren't going to genuinely think an axe-wielding maniac is going to burst through the ceiling in the middle of the night.

I find that co-op games like Mansions of Madness, especially the second edition are a really fun way to encourage teamwork. Mansions of Madness really does punish the kids if they decide they know better than the rest of the team and go charging off into the mansion on their own. It only takes a few failures for them to realise that unless decisions are taken as a group then they will make the game much harder for everyone. We haven't even beaten the first scenario yet but the kids have really gotten into the spirit of analysing what went wrong and what they would do differently next time which, as a parent, i find really encouraging. Not only does it mean that the children really enjoy playing the game but that they are also willing to learn from their experience and are even more determined to return for another attempt.
 
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