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Subject: Thoughts on a Third Time Display rss

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Time to stir up some thoughts on this game.

So in front of me I have compiled a PDF with an additional 36 past battle stages written and laid out in the same 3-column style as the original rules were. It's just about done with only a few minor trivialities left to consider, such as weights for the new artifacts. Its going to be 12 pages long, so that means about 3 stages per page. There's a thorough background for each jump, though primarily focusing on who the soldiers are and what they have.

I've thoroughly play tested each new stage by hacking the future map on the java app and balanced the difficulty by comparing the placement values from the original past map with somewhat similar statistics. Unfortunately I could not implement the new stage effects upon the java app such as airborne strafing fire, heavy fog, and freezing weather (my editing skills are limited). Also, I would like to point out that no modifications or additions were made to the original charts as I want the new map to blend seamlessly with the past and future time displays.

I'll go more into depth about why I assigned each rating to every new historical soldier presented after the PDF is uploaded.

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Archery Factors

When grading the new archers and crossbowmen, I like to use a technology scale which breaks down as follows if where judging them in comparison with the English Yeomen (attack 10) and Sioux Archers (attack 5). Accuracy would be more weighted on the individuals skill since were dealing with primarily shorter ranges, anything well within a football field. The game board represents an 11 x 11 grid with each hex measuring 5 meters.

Simple Short Bow (5)
Primitive low-tech bows
Old or Middle Kingdom Egyptians,
Akkadians under Sargon or earlier
,

...with Recurved Design (6)
The reign of Sargon's grandson or later.
New Kingdom Egyptian after interaction with Hyksos.
Chaldeans,
Early Scythians,
The Assyrian's shorter V-shaped bow. Their V-shaped longbow would be rated a (7)


...with Thumb Rings (7)
Late Scythians after circa 200 BC,
Parthians


...with Elongated Ears or 'Siha' (8)
Huns
Magyars


...with Refined Composite Materials (9)
Mongols
Seljuk and Ottoman Turks
Janissaries using draw weights from 90-160 lb.


Assymetrical Longbow (7), (9)
Japanese Yumi with traditional draw weights of 80-95 lb.

Flat Longbow (7)
American Natives with historical draw weights of 40-65 lb.
Vikings


Bamboo Longbow (8)
Pauravan Indians

Yew Longbow (9)(10)
Welsh
English Yeomen with draw weights ranging from 100-160+ lb.


...with Pyramidal Bodkins or Piles (10)
English Yeomen.


Goat's-Foot Crossbow (10)
Circa late 13th earlier 14th century.

Steel Windlass or German Crannequin (12)
Late 14th century or later


The original values for the Mongols, Magyars, Yeomen and Chaldeans have not changed. Some samurai fans may think that I gimped the yumi, but mechanically it was inferior to the Mongol bow, in fact some Samurai after the Mongol Invasions dropped their yumi and adopted the Mongols composite bow. I have the Yumi being equivalent to the flat longbow which itself is also inferior to a traditional longbow. Self correction: The Yumi was actually quite lethal as it pierced the traditional Japanese metallic lamellar 'o-Yoroi' or great armor. The arrows were obviously long and had grain weights equivalent to the English arrows for their Yew longbow. In game terms the Yumi's arrows would clearly pierce the armor and cause direct disabling wounds.
Flatbows were of better use in colder conditions. The ancient Indian bamboo longbow, though devastating during its time and did pierce bronze plating, is inferior to the later Welsh longbow. Speaking of which, the Yeomen were using bodkins at Agincourt. The composite bow used by the Huns became the standard of all nomads thereafter. The sinew-backed longbow is kind of an afterthought anyway as its not implemented in the expansion and I may have over rated it. The Sioux with their attack power of 5 are using a simple bow, though they also had a sinew-back shortbow but this was not as advanced as the later Asiatic nomads bow, so therefore the original grade of 5 is acceptable.

-----

Black-Powder Factors:

Matchlock Musket (6)
Swedish Musketeers, 1631

Wheel-lock pistol (5)
Thirty Years War

Flintlock pistol (5)
Thirty Years War

Flintlock Musket (7)
Bavarian Infantry, 1704
American Infantry, 1778

Smoothbore w/ball-n-six-swan-shot (9)
Colonial America

Smoothbore w/buck-n-ball (9)
American Civil War

Long Rifled Musket w/ball (9)
Colonial America

Rifled Carbine w/ball (8)
Napoleonic War

Rifled Musket w/Conoidals (10)
Union Infantry

As you see, the attack grade for the musketeers and riflemen have not been changed. Personally, I feel that Mr. Dunnigan gimped the power of the matchlock musket, rated a 6 for the Swedish. I am concerned becuase I did incorporate some units with slightly heavier armor, beyond the Cataphract's maximum of '6', which would mean not only are these new armors pistol proof but musket proof as well, even at short range! But I do not want to go around and change the original values of troops. I can't believe he rated the Mongols and Magyars with an accuracy of 'C' and 'G' respectively with their bows, I find that nearly insulting.

-----

Stage Effects
I tried to write them out as how they could have appeared in the original game. Artillery is carried over onto one of the new battle stages and on another stage are 'trees and bushes'

Strafing Fire:
On every Battle Stage, roll for MIG strafing fire. Roll two dice and add the results. The total (i.e., some number between “02” and “12”) indicates the column which is marked by the first two numbers of a 4 digit hex code. Strafing fire has attack value of 25. Use accuracy of 'D' and range of '1' for all strafing attacks (one attack per each unit that is in the affected column).

I'm actually inclined to dumping this one. So basically its an M16 on full auto attacking everyone in the randomly selected column on the battle map. It could also be an effect for grape-shot cannon fire.

Catapults:
On every Battle Stage, roll for Macedonian catapult launch (one debris shower per turn, with the dice rolls as per 6.0 indicating the hex it lands on). Use accuracy of 'A' for all ranges listed. A debris shower does damage as follows: In the hex of impact, strength of “12” and accuracy of “A;” 1 hex away, strength of “9” and accuracy of “A;” 2 hexes away, strength of “7” and accuracy of “A;” 3 hexes away, strength of “5” and accuracy of “A.”

This one is okay, I may dump it too, though I really like the historical aspect of this particular battle and the soldiers involved. Its a softer version of the artillery strike.

Heavy Fog:
A heavy pea-soup fog blankets the field. The dice roll used to determine the accuracy of missile combat is modified under the following circumstances (see rule 8.23): E. If the battle is experiencing heavy fog, subtract one from the dice roll.

I like this one, and the next one.

Freezing Weather / Snowstorm:
Each Phase a Tripper does nothing, he gains back only two Endurance Points instead of the usual three (11.0).
Upon a soldier receiving a WOUND, a single die is rolled. A roll of 1-4 indicates that the soldier is disabled; a roll of 5 or 6 indicates that the soldier is stunned (8.82).

So when the Tripper stops to rest, that's when he will feel the numbing cold, otherwise the adrenaline and distraction of running around and fighting mentally negates it for him, and an opponent is likely to freeze to death when he's fallen from his wounds waiting for help, see Eylau 1807 as a good example.

Think of all the battles that took place in the freezing cold. There's a handful of them with this effect.
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David Kilpatrick
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I've not played the game enough to offer input from a mechanics viewpoint and I have even less of a history background to comment thematically but I'm very impressed with the effort you've put in Biofury in developing this expansion. I really hope it can be incorporated into the Java application by Robin allowing PBEM players the opportunity to explore this new time display that you've created. This has been a huge project with lots of reading, what do you plan to do with your leisure time when it's finished. Any chance you will create a new future display shake
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I will definitely continue to read more material on this subject. Virtually a limitless selection of history out there.

Applying new future stages has crossed my mind a few times, but I do like some of the originals, though many of them I don't care for, just not feeling it. I may just shoe-horn some new ones to replace a few of the originals for my personal printed version.
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I wanted to see what the chances were of converting followers, as this plays into the balance of the placement issue when making new battle stages. The following chart shows the chances for each grades successful Awe result when attempting one Negotiation attempt. These results do not include Flee chances, but those were factored in.

ABC: 0%
BCD: 0%
CDE: 1.9%
DEF: 5.6%
EFG: 13.5%
FGH: 25.4%

The rest of this shows the average number of opponents that were not successfully Awed after one round of Negotiations. This figure is a good starting point to determine what the value of the soldiers' weighted statistics are. Of course some battles have unique stage effects which complicates matter further.

Cave Men:
5.6

Egyptian Spearmen:
7.8

Trojans:
6.1

Chaldean Archers:
4.8

Hoplites & Peltasts:
3.3 each

Libyan Spearmen:
6.6
(+ Elephants)

Roman Legionaires:
6.6

Slingers & Gallic Swordsmen
3.3 each

Mounted Ostrogoths:
7.1

Viking Axemen:
5.2

Mounted Magyar Bowmen:
6.1

Norman Mounted Men-at-Arms
4.1

Mounted Cataphracts
4.1

Mongolian Horse Archers
6.1

British Yeomen:
4.1

Landsknechts:
6.1

Swedish Musketeers:
6.6

Bavarian Infantry:
6.9

American Infantry:
6.7

French Hussars:
6.6

Zulus:
7.8

Union Infantry:
5.2

Sioux Warriors & Bowmen:
5.4 & 3.4

German Infantry:
3.4

French Infantry:
3.3

Russian Cossacks:
5.2

Italian Infantry:
8.5

Russian Infantry:
5.4

British Infantry:
4.2

German Fugitive Infantry:
6.6

Japanese Banzai Troops:
7.8

Chinese Infantry:
7.6

Syrian Infantry:
7.6

Palestinian Terrorists:
5.6

Egyptian Militia:
6.6

Hells Angels:
5.6

Unarmed Citizens & Revolutionary Militia:
6.6 & 5.2

Mutant Spearmen:
4.8

Mind Police:
7.5
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Pistols

The .357 magnum revolver and .25 pocket pistol are the only two handguns available at the start of the game when equipping the Tripper. It would be nice if more pistols were optional. Though, not just anything. Let's stick with common models that frequented the soldiers side. We do need a point of reference for the attack power though so we'll base it off the magnum's power of 15 and the pocket's 10. Grain weight and muzzle energy of the rounds used during the Vietnam War era should be taken into consideration, so many of these rounds were not as 'hot' as some of the optional load-outs we have today. Also note that one of the Trippers could have been a Tunnel Rat, so I was considering completing the list with the following;

.357 magnum revolver @ 540 - 590 ft-lb w/4" or 5" barrel & 158 grain
Attack of 15, Empty roll: 2-4 / 2-6
Accuracy-Single: F, Rapid: D

.45 ACP semi-auto @ ~350 ft-lb w/5" barrel & 230 grain
Attack of 13, Empty roll: 6 / 4-6
Accuracy-Single: F, Rapid: D

.38 Special 'Victory' revolver @ ~250 ft-lb w/4" barrel & 158 grain
Attack of 12, Empty roll: 2-4 / 2-6
Accuracy-Single: F, Rapid: D

.32 Colt 1903 Pocket 'Hammerless' @ ~128 ft/lb w/4" barrel & 71 grain
Attack of 11

.22LR High Standard semi-auto @ ~70 ft-lb w/7" barrel & 36 or 40 grain
Attack of 10, Empty roll: 5 / 3-5
Accuracy-Single: F, Rapid: D

.25 pocket pistol @ ~65 ft-lb w/2" barrel & 50 grain
Attack of 10, Empty roll: 2-4 / 2-6
Accuracy-Single: H, Rapid: E

.40 QSPR revolver (7.5gr x 15) @ ~135 ft-lb
Attack of 12 (single) or 8 (rapid), Empty roll: 2-4 / 2-6
Accuracy: G

The accuracy grades for the .22LR could be rated in either direction as compared to the .357 magnum or .25 pistol depends on where you draw the line., but the .25 is virtually useless at anything beyond point blank, even the .22LR with the suppressor is still better. Self correction: Actually the .22 in this case is roughly equivalent, but is clearly inferior if shot from a 2" barrel yielding only ~40 ft-lbs as compared to the .25's 70 ft-lb from the same barrel length.

Note that there is no indication in the game for the .357 magnum's reduced powder loads or standard powder loads due in regards to recoil. Hence why I have a wide range for its energy yield. Higher energy yields mentioned when it was first introduced is due to an 8" barrel, of which the Time Tripper is not using. That produced a muzzle velocity a bit higher than 1500 ft/sec. With the model that's in play, the 4" barrel would produce a reading of around 1240 ft/sec.

As a revolver, the .40 cal. QSPR is a miniature shotgun, each round discharging 15 tiny pellets. I have no idea on what to assign for its power. Definitely not 20 or 15 points as that is the single- and rapid-rated power for the actual 12-gauge shotgun. Perhaps 14 for single- and 10 for rapid-fire, and keep both accuracy levels at G? Maybe those figures are too high since its not designed to pierce armor, but for much-required noise reduction and clearing out short passageways, after all, it was specifically designed for tunnel rats, so power ratings of 12 and 8 probably fit better, especially with the combined muzzle energy of 135 ft-lbs. If only a few pellets hit, then the combined power is less than even the lowly .25 pistol's power of 10. Those that went into the tunnels and shot their .45's too many times came out permanently deaf or just about. Suppressed .38's and .22's were more favored.

The 9mm pistols were too rare and sparingly used, along with the officers' semi-auto .38 supers. The M60 is way too heavy to tote around in this game. However I could see the M14 as another rifle option.
Just for shits and giggles, here's one more:

.44 magnum revolver @ ~750 ft-lb
Attack of 17, Empty roll: 2-4 / 2-6
Accuracy-Single: F, Rapid: E

I'm not implementing this gun, as extremely few hot shots in the war actually used them. However, I am going to let my Time Trippers use the following:

M14 semi-automatic rifle 7.62 x 51 mm @ ~2400 - 2560 ft-lb
Attack of 17, Empty roll: 3 / 6
Accuracy-Single: A, Rapid: C

This rifle has the 20 round box without automatic-fire mode as those were immediately deemed uncontrollable. Its empty roll is based on the rapid fire analysis of the handguns as your pulling the trigger one at a time per shot instead of just holding it down.
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I don't know in which direction I should go for designing the additional counters for this 3rd time display...

Make them just like the originals, simple drawings and silhouettes on white tiles? Or try to design counters similar to the newly redesigned set and match the colors?

Otherwise the PDF for the entire battle stage listings is completed.
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Animals

Onto the subject of applying additional animal encounters for my expanded prehistoric battle stages, the entire evaluation process turns into a can of worms. First off, there's not many animals in the standard battle stages to compare new ones too. The entire zoo comprises of just a T-Rex, ankylosaurs, a sabre-tooth cat, buffalos, elephants, giant wolves and landmobile sharks. Those last two are a bit of a stretch as those are found in the fantasy stages. I envision the maxiwolves as a clones of canis dirus and the sharks are the same variants found in the ocean but with telekinetic ability to shift the immediate dirt from their body. I am not even considering the dragon as those creatures come in enormous variants of size, shape and type. However, this one is likely red, and I did copy its ratings for its fire-breathing attack for opposing soldiers' flamethrowers.

Another twisted aspect of comparing the animals was that some of them have endurance points like the Time Tripper, though these only seem to be applied to only the larger carnivores. The Smilodon with 10 and Tyrannosaurus with 20. Elephants do not even have any. The elephants used at Zama were of the Carthaginian type, a breed that long ago went extinct, too many were drafted into the military and slaughtered in battle or died due to environmental conditions during a campaign. These were a smaller species, similar to modern day African Forest elephants, so about 4000 – 6000 lb max.

The Sabre-Tooth cat is likely the larger of the three distinct species, smilodon populator.

Titanis Walleri were terror birds found in North America. Florida was a good hunting ground as it rose from the ocean floor within the last few million years. They would be in the next heavier weight class compared to Canis Dirus. I judged the Terror Birds' detection to be an 'E', similar to Sabre-tooth as they would prowl and shadow their prey between the foliage before pouncing. I didn't envision their aggressiveness on the same level being as voracious and ferocious as starving winter wolves or blood-frenzied sharks. Those last two had detection grades of 'H'. Physically, I see the terror bird's hook beak being superior at penetrating armor than a shark's bite if both are of equivalent body mass, Therefore an '11' vs '10' for attack grades is appropriate. However, terror birds are probably not as robust as a shark. With one injured leg, they become tactically inept. Therefore, an '11' vs '12' for defense should be fine. I also thought about a '12X10E' rating as well, though I'm not sure if the terror birds overall attack power should be equal to that of a Sabre-Tooth Cat of two or three times the bird's weight.

Arctodus Simus was a short-faced bear that migrated into North America via the Beringia land bridge. Compared to modern grizzly or polar bears of the same weight, Arctodus would have had slightly longer limbs, though the polar bear has the longer neck. Overall, arctodus is in a higher weight class than the smilodon populator. I also put its detection score conveniently between sabre tooth cats 'E' and Tyrannosaur's 'C'. Arctodus was also on average, a bit heavier than a grizzly. Modern grizzly's of over 1000 lb are those that feed on human garbage.

Megatherium was the largest of the giant ground sloths. Found in South America, alpha males were just north of 5000 lb, though even higher estimates of over 8000 lb might have been possible. Megatherium had excessively long claws. The sloth's aggressiveness was certainly lax compared to the Smilodon and T-Rex, after-all, it was a herbivore, though possibly a scavenger too. The Megatherium's skeleton was quite thick and robust to the point that some consider it as a form of subdermal armor. This giant sloth was not built for speed, and may have been one of the slowest animals in its ecosystem.

T-Rex is regarded as being 12,000 – 14,000 lb at its maximum size.

Giant Wolves
Canis Dirus
Weight: 130 - 200 lb
10X10H

Terror Birds
Titanis Walleri
Weight: 300 - 350 lb
11X11E

Sabre-Tooth Cat
Smilodon Populator
Weight: 490 – 880 lb
Endurance: 10
12X12E

Short-Face Bear
Arctodus Simus
Weight: 880 – 2100 lb
Endurance: 12
13X13D

Giant Ground Sloth
Megatherium
Weight: 5200 – 8800 lb
Endurance: 15
14X14B
Notes: The Giant Ground Sloth has a Movement Allowance of three hexes per Historical Soldier Phase.

Tyrannosaurus Rex
Weight: 12,000 – 14,000 lb
Endurance: 20
15X15C
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Weapon Drops
Effectively, there are only three types of melee weapons for use under the standard rules; (1) the bayonet, (2) a recovered melee weapon, (3) and insect repellent. The first has an attack value of '3' and weighs '½ lb'. The second is a cache all category for all melee weapon drops assigned with an attack and weight value of '4'. The repellent has an attack grade of '2' and weighs '½ lb.' A fourth option, in which I find quite awesome, is to use the insect repellent with the bayonet for a combined attack of '7' and a weight of '1 lb'. There is also a desperate fourth option of fighting unarmed at an attack value of '1', but I personally have never had my Time Tripper conduct a battle in this manner, having always equipped and used the bayonet as a last resort.

I disliked the aspect of putting all recovered melee weapons under one generic category. Granted, a lot of the weapons found would be very similar to each other, the vast majority being short arming swords and spears. With a weight value of '4' this would include virtually all one-handed weapons. Also, we should expect that the Time Tripper, being a soldier from the Vietnam war was trained to be a better marksman than hand-to-hand combatant, so therefore an attack value of '4' for all those weapons seems appropriate enough, however, I feel that weapons using two hands to utilize greater leverage should give the Time Tripper more power, and obviously some of these two-handed items are better as defeating metal armor than others.

Training / Experience
The variant weapon values also make it slightly easier to evaluate the training and experience of historical soldiers which I depicted between a range of 0 – 4 points when combined with the base weapon's attack value.

The following would be a generalized guide of how I would measure the soldier's competence in melee. It works fairly well as a measuring stick for much of the standard game's soldiers and those additional troops that I have integrated.

A zero-grade would basically mean no amount of training or experience worth mentioning.

One point would represent minimal or standard training and little, if any, experience.

Two points would be graded for troops that have undergone standard training and bloodied in the front line, experiencing actual hand-to-hand combat and perhaps even some shell shock.

Three points are awarded to a superior-grade of troops that have been formidably trained and well-experienced. Definitely a hardened cast of active units.

Four points are basically given to 'orphans of war', or rather those soldiers who were indoctrinated for melee combat since late childhood/preteens. A lifetime's experience in war.

Superior Melee Weapon Drops
The following are some melee weapon additions that I allow my Time Tripper to recover at certain battle stages.

Recovered 1014 or 885 Dane Axe
Attack: 5
Weight: 5 lb
This is a 3-4 ft battle axe wielded in both hands by the Time Tripper. It is similar in size to a modern lumberman's axe but the Dane version it's definitely lighter overall and with a wider cleaving bearded-shaped blade. The Time Tripper's attack value of '5' with this axe is quite pathetic when compared to the berserked fury and experience of Viking Huscarls rated at '9' found at battle stage 12, Siege of Paris.

Recovered 1477 Swiss Halberd
Attack: 6
Weight: 7 lb
This is an 8 - 10 ft tall Sempach halberd or German bill that evolved from the shorter Swiss vouge. Though primarily used in mass in a thrusting motion, utilizing the large cleaver or back-spike deals tremendous wounds upon a human body when the situation allows for long sweeping or chopping motions. Overall, this was clearly one of the best melee weapons to use against heavily armored opponents and had good versatility with its three business ends. The main drawback of this longer polearm was that it left the wielder exposed if the opponent got 'inside' the weapon. For this reason, the shorter pollaxe would be preferable. If I assigned the Time Tripper with an attack of '6'. That's quite an improvement, but not worth comparing to the brutality of the halberd in the hands of the Swiss themselves.

Recovered 1512 Doppelhander
Attack: 6
Weight: 7 lb
This is a large German two-handed, cleaving broadsword usually 48-60 inches in overall length. This is the maximum length for practicality in actual combat as anything longer was awkward in use, designed for parades and personal status. The flameberge was the wavy-shaped blade that supposedly helped hack apart pikes with its vague saw-like application, though likely used for display instead. The Time Tripper would find it irresistible for using it to hack opponents in long cleaving motions for an attack value of just '6'. The Time Tripper wields it awkwardly and slowly compared to the well-experienced mercenary Landsknechts who are graded '9' in its use at battle stage 18, Ravenna.

Recovered 1945, 1638, 1600, 1274 Katana
Attack: 5
Weight: 3 lb
The Tokugawa Shogunate mandated the production of samurai swords to be of a shortened length of about 70 cm or less upon the beginning of the 17th century. Used in one hand it has the same attack value of all other melee weapon drops, a '4', however when the Time Tripper wields it with two hands, the extra leverage improves the attack quality to '5'. As great as the folded-steel katana was, and all the mythical hype emanating from the sword, it was not designed to, and cannot slice through carbonized hammered steel cuirasses. This is why I have the halberd and pollaxe superior in attack values. The doppelhander is a can-of-worms in this respect, but its twice the weight and about twice the length of the katana. Remember that this katana is the shorter version, just a bit longer than the wakizashi. This is not the 4ft nagamaki or 42 inch tachi. The artifact from battle-stage 33, Guam, would likely be a machine-made shin gunto. This was the katana assigned to Japanese army officers in WW2.

Melee Training / Experience of Historical Soldiers

The following list is a simple judgment of the historical soldiers melee attack strengths. We are disregarding any missile attacks for this comparison.

Cave men
One would at first think that the training and experience level s for cave men should be higher, but the proper context in that judgment would be applied when hunting and animals, not other humans. Cro-Magnon Buffalo Hunt is an obvious reference to early homo sapiens, not Neanderthals. Early humans exploited the use of primitive archery and spear throwing when hunting whereas Neanderthals did things more barbarically and directly engaging animals in direct melee to hunt them. Neanderthals were generally built more robust and stronger than humans, therefore a '1' for early humans fits well.
Year: 23,568 BC
Weapons: 4
Tr/Exp: 1
Attack: 5

Egyptian Spearmen
Typically, Egyptian Spearmen were recruited from units with no prior battle experience, drawn into the ordered ranks and undergoing thorough training regime. Those under Ramses at Kadesh were a great example of this as well. The elites of this era were the battle hardened and blood-thirsty Sherdan mercenaries, some serving or pressed into as Ramses Lifeguard. I would apply these warriors the Tr/Exp level of '3'.
Year: 1469 BC
Weapons: 4
Tr/Exp: 1
Attack: 5

Trojans
A portion of the 'Sea Peoples' of the era were composed of these very men. Migrating throughout and raiding the eastern Mediterranean. I would say that they were sort of like the Vikings of their era.
Year: 1184 BC
Weapons: 4
Tr/Exp: 2
Attack 6

Hoplites
These are the typical Athenian Hoplites and are quite competent in battle. However, I would award hoplites in the Spartan right wing or Theban Sacred Band a Tr/Exp level of '4'.
Year: 490 BC
Weapons: 4
Tr/Exp: 3
Attack: 7

Libyan Spearmen
Numidian Spearmen would perhaps be the more contextually appropriate name for these warriors of this era. They were actually known more for and had the best mounted light horsemen of the Punic Wars. infantry. Roman cavalry was average, at best, until Scipio conquered the Iberian Peninsula and was able to recruit or press Numidian cavalry into the Roman army.
Year: 202 BC
Weapons: 4
Tr/Exp: 2
Attack: 6

Roman Legionaires
Caesar's own legions were arguably the most experienced of their era, though Pompei's were formidable as well, but I would give Caesar's the edge, and they proved this at Pharsalus 48 BC. Crassus, of course, had the inferior of the three triumveres.
I would apply a training/experience level of '4' to the Praetorian Guards under Emperor Domitian and Trajan, as those Praetorians actually had to fight in numerous battles of the Dacian campaigns to earn their ranks.
Year: 52 BC
Weapons: 4
Tr/Exp: 3
Attack: 7

Gallic Swordsmen
In the battle-oriented arena, the weak would immediately have been weeded out rather quickly through repeated combats, that is, they ended up dead or perished later from infected wounds. Those that survived long term learned rather very quickly and had a good run of luck. Gallic Swordsmen encountered at this battle stage would be extremely dangerous in hand-to-hand combat. These are probably champion grade slaves-turned-warriors as I had to give them a '4' in Tr/Exp to equal the original attack score of '8'. On th other hand, the Peltasts are sort of a joke on this battle-stage with their pricking-you-to-death tactics. One question now remains: Where's the lions or tigers for this stage?
Year: 108 AD
Weapons: 4
Tr/Exp: 4
Attack: 8

Mounted Ostrogoths
They were also spelled via Astral-goths, which I believe is in reference to the stars, though I have no idea how this name came about and I could be completely wrong on this entire thought process. They are however, one major faction of German tribesmen that migrated into Eastern Europe, the Visigoths into southern Europe, and the Vandals into northern Africa.
Caution: The Time Tripper should warn the Ostrogoths that the Huns are about to invade their newly conquered lands very shortly. Though it will be the Visigoths themselves who actually repel them outta Gaul.
Year: 378
Weapons: 4
Tr/Exp: 2
Attack: 6
Mounted: 8

Viking Axemen

Just a quick mention about the Huscarls. Dunnigan mentioned them having a shield in the battle-stage description and an axe that was 3 ft long. I have deemed this as a two-handed Dane axe of 3 to 4 ft in length, and the cache is that the shield is strapped to their back, not held in their off-hand.
Year: 885
Weapons: 5
Tr/Exp: 4
Attack: 9

Norman Mounted Men-at-Arms
While all knights were considered men-at-arms, not all men-at-arms were knights. In other words, these Normans also include sergeants at this battle-stage. The stats could be considered and average of the two classes. Though likely most of these men are nobles as they are mounted units, and in that case, likely knights or more precisely 'milites'.
Year: 1066
Weapons: 4
Tr/Exp: 3
Attack: 7
Mounted: 9

Mounted Cataphracts
Tr/Exp in melee would be a step lower than Western heavy mounted units as Cataphracts from the east focused as much on archery as well as melee. Those that leaned more towards archery were Cataphracts, and those that leaned more towards melee and the shock factor were Clibanari. Some armies at certain times abandoned the bow of their Clibanari to other supportive units as the heavy cavalry specialized into breaking the line. Well, at least that’s how I perceive the entire context of my study with these various units and their numerous confusing Latin and Greek spellings. I explain this in much more depth on another battle-stage.
Year: 1071
Weapons: 4
Tr/Exp: 2
Attack: 6
Mounted: 9

Landsknechts
Their competence in combat was equivalent to the ridiculous flamboyance of their outfits.
Year: 1512
Weapons: 6
Tr/Exp: 3
Attack: 9

Swedish Musketeers
This one is a bit difficult to judge. They are musketeers that do not use bayonets. That implementation debuts sometime in the 1670s and doesn't become widely adopted until the turn of the next century. Walloon swords and other various short-arming swords were carried by musketeers at their side. These are not knives or daggers, hence they have an attack value of '4' not '3'. However, hatchets persisted too, but the most common tactic during the era, especially with the English Civil musketeers was to smash your opponent with the butt of the musket turning it into a makeshift club. This last tactic is how I graded the Swedish.
Year: 1631
Weapons: 3
Tr/Exp: 1
Attack: 4

Bavarian Infantry
Welcome to the new century of ridiculously opulent, unnecessary, and uncomfortably tight and 'loud' colored, eye-catching uniforms not designed for actual military use. Starvation-induced broken supply chain-of-command included.
Year: 1704
Weapons: 3
Tr/Exp: 1
Attack: 4

American Infantry
Revolutionaries attack with hatchets, long daggers or fixed bayonets in the melee.
Year: 1778
Weapons: 3
Tr/Exp: 1
Attack: 4

French Hussars

At first a rating of '2' seems a bit short for overly romanticized, lady swooning and historically hyped cavalrymen. Not these guys at this battle-stage. The vast majority of Napoleon's elite forces were lost during the winter retreat from Moscow of 1812 and further losses of what was left at the epic battle of Leipzig 1813. Those Hussars at Waterloo were a somewhat far cry from what was originally performed before the Great Retreat. Many of them were recently recruited, however some were still from Eastern Europe (known for their light cavalrymen) so some semblance of competence has to be awarded. I think a grade of '2' for their training/experience is fine.
Year: 1815
Weapons: 4
Tr/Exp: 2
Attack: 6
Mounted: 8

Zulus
These Zulu that the British Army encountered had shortened spears and trained to stab with them rather than throw them.
Year: 1838
Weapons: 4
Tr/Exp: 3
Attack: 7

Union Infantry
Armed with bayonets for melee. Though the more preferable option with most soldiers was to simply draw out the revolver and fire away at your foe. A modicum of bayonet training was performed 'by the book'. I believe these were originally copied from French manuals, not to mention a whole horde of other paraphernalia and fashion deriving from the French. Yea, the North was obsessed with all things France during this decade. The Union Zouaves loved their uniforms because they were more comfortable than the earlier military issued clothes.
Year: 1862
Weapons: 3
Tr/Exp: 1
Attack: 4

Sioux Warriors
“A boy named Sioux”
The American Old West has been done to death as a subject. I'm not gonna beat a dead horse.
Year: 1876
Weapons: 4
Tr/Exp: 1
Attack: 5

Hells Angels
Year: 1983
Weapons: 4
Tr/Exp: 1
Attack: 5
Mounted: 7

Mutant Spearmen
Year: 2396
Weapons: 4
Tr/Exp: 4
Attack: 8
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BLACK POWDER PISTOLS
I thought it would be nice to have black powder revolvers available as weapon drops on the American Old West and Civil War battle stages. Unfortunately, the pistols are either equivalent to or more powerful than the original attack ratings of the opponents who are firing with rifled muskets. I am assuming the Sioux are just using their bows with that attack rating of '5' which I have mentioned earlier in this thread, though the description of that battle stage does mention Spencer, Sharps or Winchester rifles and carbines. It'd be safe to assume they also captured a few revolvers too.

.44 Revolver w/8” barrel
Remington Model 1858 or Colt Army Model 1860
215 grain conical w/28 grain powder @ 820 ft/sec = (321 ft-lb)
215 grain conical w/35 grain powder @ 893 ft/sec = (380 ft-lb)
Attack of 13

143 grain ball w/28 grain powder @ 876 ft/sec = (238 ft-lb)
Attack of 12

225 grain conical w/15 grain powder @ 640 ft/sec = (207 ft-lb)
Attack of 12

These revolvers were quite abundant throughout the Civil War, the Colt more so than Remington.
Cartridge loadings were not standardized in the Army during this time. Rounds were produced by various contracted manufacturers, each with their own various bullet and powder weights.
A Union Ordnance Manual of 1861 specified a load of 30 grains of powder with a .46-caliber, 216 grain conical bullet in Colt M1860 revolvers of .44-caliber.
However, the average load for the Colt M1860 was 25 grains of powder with a 230 grain conical bullet or 146 grain round ball.

.36 Revolver
Colt Navy Model 1851
The same manual specifies a .39 caliber conical bullet of 145 grains with over 17 grains of powder for the .36 caliber revolvers.
The average load for the Colt Navy 1851 was 15 grains of powder with an 81 grain round ball or a 146 grain conical bullet.
Overall muzzle energy produced would be less than 100 ft-lb, placing it in the same vicinity as the .25 Baby Browning, but not so low as a snub-nose .22LR
Attack of 10

Colt Walker .44 Model 1847 w/9” barrel
With 40 – 50 grains of black powder and a 218 grain conical bullet, this would produce muzzle energy north of 400 ft-lb. With 60 grains of powder, its flirts with 500 ft-lbs of energy, though with a load that heavy, you compromise the long-term durability of the pistol. This was generally the most powerful revolver cartridge until the introduction of the .357 magnum cartridge in the 1930s.
Attack of 14

These next two guns represent models that were introduced in 1873. Metallic cartridges became standardized as paper cartridges phased out.

.32 Long Colt Black Powder
82 grain @ 790 ft/sec = (114 ft-lb)
80 grain @ 840 ft/sec = (126 ft-lb)
95 grain @ 700 ft/sec = (104 ft-lb)
Attack of 11

.45 Long Colt Black Powder ('Peacemaker' 1873)
225 grain @ 960 ft/sec = (460 ft-lb)
255 grain @ 860 ft/sec = (420 ft-lb)
Attack of 14
 
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