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Het Stratégisch Spel, Of Militaire Uitspanning» Forums » Rules

Subject: Combat rules rss

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Pelle Nilsson
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The base rule is that if you move units into a post so that you have more units than the defenders there, they must retreat in their next turn. If all roads are blocked they are eliminated for failure to retreat. If you do not have enough attackers to win the combat you
are not allowed to attack (with a few exceptions).

Some posts provide advantages to the attacker or defender so that the number of units required to win the battle is changed. For instance to attack a capital or fort you need to have more than four times as many attackers as there are defenders. Some posts are very difficult to defend and can be taken even by a force that is one unit smaller than the defending force.

There are also posts where cavalry can not defend at all (in the mountains).

Then there is a bunch of special rules for how different unit types interact. For instance heavy cavalry in equal numbers to light cavalry will be stronger, except in the mountains where the opposite is true.

Also if two forces are of equal size, but one is a mix of cavalry and infantry, and the other consists of only one type, then the mixed force is considered stronger.

Have not mapped out all those different rules to see if they cover all possible situations or if there are situations where they conflict, but hopefully it can be sorted out, and there is always the base case of "more units is stronger than fewer units" to fall back to.

If the attackers are not stronger than the defenders, but both have the exact same strength (after all the modifications for terrain and unit types) then the attacker can use randomness, in the shape of the included dice. From what I can tell it is just a 50/50 chance (4-6 is success?) so a coin-flip will do as well. The loser has to retreat their units from the combat. If the attacker loses they must also eliminate one of their units, so they take a great risk.

Combat is actually resolved on the other player's turn (defender must retreat on their next turn, as seen above), so the defender can reinforce the combat on their turn. If they manage to bring the number of units up to exactly the same strength as the attackers the attacker must decide to retreat or still attempt to roll dice. However in this case if the die-roll is a success for the attacker the defender loses one unit, so by trying to reinforce the combat the defender introduces risk also to their own units. If the combat is reinforced so much that the defenders are now stronger the attackers must retreat.

So from what I can tell combat also is resolved in two player turns: The attacker moves into a post, and during the next player's turn the result will be decided. The exceptions may be if a post is attacked when out of supply or surrounded, in which case I think they are immediately eliminated when attacked (in the case of not enough supplies they are eliminated by any attacking force, even just a single unit).

Then there are all sorts of special rules in addition to the above. For instance if there is a magazine in the attacked post and attackers come over open ground (no entrenchements on the side the attack comes in from) they will burn down the magazine even if the attack fails (ie the defenders reinforce the post so that they must fall back). However if they attack only from protected sides they will only be able to destroy (or take control of, if they prefer) the magazines if they win the battle.

It all looks quite playable and makes sense. Lots of chrome and special cases to keep track of. There is a table in the rulebook that is not included in the scan on Google Books. I think/hope it has a summary of the combat rules to help remember all the possible cases. Or something like that. Hopefully I will soon know as I am working on ordering some scans of the rulebook.

There are several pages of illustrated examples in the rulebook, covering most of the different combat rules. I have yet to look through them in detail to see if they confirm or contradict my interpretations. There are probably some details I need to come back to edit later.

This description is based on the Dutch rulebook available on Google Books and the illustration reprinted in C G Lewin's book about wargame history (the one that illustrates the examples).

Eddy Sterckx
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helped out translate a few paragraphs from old Dutch.
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Eddy Sterckx
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You know that if you post the picture of a genie, he'll show up whistle

Probably didn't mention it, but "post" in Dutch (also) means "position", i.e. location, area, a particular field on a board.

 
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Pelle Nilsson
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Post works in Swedish as well, but I guess for the English translation it will be better to use Point (or Position... but that just adds at lot of useless letters to type/read).
 
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Pelle Nilsson
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Closer reread of the rules and a bit of solo playtesting convinced me that I was slightly wrong about how to randomly resolve battles. It should be just a single die-roll (or coin flip?) not opposed rolls. I silently modified the description above. ninja
 
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