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Subject: Printing a board game rss

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Renan Sanches
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Hello all,

I am developing a board game and i want to print an alpha version.
But i am having a hard time trying to discover in what material the board games are printed in. Could you guys help me in discovering this information?

I want to make a decent playtest version,printing it in common paper is out of question.

Thanks in advance!
 
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Paul DeStefano
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If printing on common cardboard is out of the question, most board game companies will be going out of business.
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Renan Sanches
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I think i got lost in translation here.
What i meant is "thick paper"( sorry my first language is not english, sometimes i make mistakes )
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Carl Nyberg
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If it's just an alpha version, why don't you just print it on paper?
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Matthew Austin
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The Game Crafter is an excellent source for game prototypes. They can print all sorts of board game pieces, or you can just look at the website to see the types of materials they use:

https://www.thegamecrafter.com/

Print & Play Productions is also another great printer for custom cards and game components:

http://www.printplaygames.com/
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Renan Sanches
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If i cant print locally i will eventually hire print and play to do the job for me.
 
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Renan Sanches
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bill437 wrote:
If it's just an alpha version, why don't you just print it on paper?


Even it being an alpha version i want it to be a decent looking version
 
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Travis Dean
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Knowing what components your game needs will help, but for now here's a couple links to threads for PnP of games.

How To: A Board and Bits Tutorial
Working on the Railroad: Building My Print-and-Play Copy of 1889
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Craig Somerton
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You should only be spending money printing a board if it is in the final stages of development and unlikely to change.

How it looks may be important to you, but it is easy to get caught in the cycle of trying to make your prototype look perfect and spending a lot of money doing so.

Any good playtester worth their salt will overlook a paper board and sleeved cards - as long as the game is solid and plays well.

Hell, I've seen a number of prominent and highly successful game designers whose prototypes are simply printed onto bits of paper - perfectly acceptable, until you get to the point where the game is virtually finished - then you make it look pretty.
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Dave Platt
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A4 labels do a good job.
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Rob Harper
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I suppose this kinda begs the question: what do you mean when you call it an "alpha" version? Has the game been tested at all?

Does alpha mean it is the first round of testing? Or the first round of non-solo testing? Or the first round of testing outside your "inner circle"? Or early blind testing?

I don't think there is really a universally agreed meaning of alpha testing in boardgame design, so it might help to know where you have got to.

I'd definitely fall in with the majority advice here though: if you are in the early stages of testing and the game has had little (if any) actual testing, then it is likely to need to change dramatically. This is the case even for very experienced designers. If you have spent a lot of time and money on creating a "nice" prototype at this stage, then this may make it difficult for you to be willing to make the necessary changes for fear of wasting your earlier efforts.

Until your game has been through a few rounds of testing and is becoming reasonably stable, I would strongly recommend doing the least possible work to make the game playable. It is usually easy to explain to playtesters that you are trying to make sure that the gameplay is good, and later versions will have better presentation.

If you are determined to make a nice prototype board for your game, though, a good trick is to find a board from an old game that you don't want, print out (or hand draw -- this can be surprisingly effective) your board onto paper (multiple pieces if necessary) and glue the paper onto the old board. Or alternatively you can glue onto foamboard to make chunky components and boards that look nice.
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Jonas Thyssen
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rbsann wrote:
bill437 wrote:
If it's just an alpha version, why don't you just print it on paper?


Even it being an alpha version i want it to be a decent looking version


Print it on paper and glue it onto cardboard. It's not hard to get a decent looking result, and if you practice a bit you can even get very good results

Somebody already linked the very good board and bits tutrorial. But there are a ton of these kinds of guides on these forums.
 
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