$5.00
$20.00
$15.00
$30.00
Recommend
5 
 Thumb up
 Hide
5 Posts

Wargames» Forums » General

Subject: 82nd airborne question rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Jason Kruse
United States
New Orleans
Louisiana
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
mbmbmbmbmb
Ok this may be a dumb question but once the 82nd dropped into France, they were active for 33 days straight. During this time did they have access to artillery or air support? Please mention source with answer.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Carl Fung
United States
Old Greenwich
Connecticut
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb
JASONMKRUSE wrote:
Ok this may be a dumb question but once the 82nd dropped into France, they were active for 33 days straight. During this time did they have access to artillery or air support? Please mention source with answer.


For artillery, I assume you mean artillery outside of their organic artillery battalions (319 and 320 Glider Field Arty and 456 Para Field Arty Battalions)? The two Glider Artillery Battalions arrived on the night of June 6 via gliders and the 456 Para Field Arty Bn landed by sea at Utah on June 8.

The 82nd was assigned the following independent artillery battalions along with the dates when they were assigned during the Normandy campaign. The interesting thing to note is that the 456th is listed as attached on certain days instead of being organic (and hence wouldn't be listed as such):

"456th FA Bn 8 Jun 44-10 Jun 44
87th FA Bn 14 Jun 44-17 Jun 44
188th FA Bn (155mm How) 14 Jun 44-19 Jun 44
456th FA Bn 15 Jun 44-17 Jun 44
87th Armd FA Bn 16 Jun 44-19 Jun 44

Co B, 87th Cml Mort Bn 16 Jun 44-18 Jun 44"

Note that the 87th field Artillery Bn was Self-Propelled, the armored notation is missing from the first entry.

Source: http://www.history.army.mil/documents/eto-ob/82ABD-ETO.htm

As for Air Support, I'm sure they were and I don't see why they wouldn't as they would've received Army Air Corps coordinators since they were on the ground for so long.
29 
 Thumb up
4.00
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jason Kruse
United States
New Orleans
Louisiana
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
mbmbmbmbmb
Wow thanks so much!
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andy Daglish
United Kingdom
Cheadle
Cheshire
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
JASONMKRUSE wrote:
Ok this may be a dumb question but once the 82nd dropped into France, they were active for 33 days straight. During this time did they have access to artillery or air support? Please mention source with answer.

No to close air support. This would have been mediated by British Typhoons as the IXth TAC had reluctantly only just begun to form specialist ground attack squadrons. Methods of training were unknown. Inexperience also affected US fighters who tended to attack anything which didn't look like their own, ie. Typhoons, or that they hadn't been warned about [eg. friendly bombers etc]. Differentiating enemy positions from those of paratroops would be virtually impossible, and hitting any target was unlikely. Strafing worked best, due to the larger number of projectiles. Rockets were eventually deemed of little use versus personnel targets, and versus armoured vehicles required direct hits, which was largely a matter of luck.

It was a good idea not to provide air support during the first few days when para units were trying to sort themselves out, but anti-parachute training emphasised close engagement, which prevented heavy weapons supporting paras. The reason why the 82nd and 101st weren't damaged much more badly than they were was due to rapid relief from the near-unopposed landing on Utah [this could have appeared many hours sooner than it did, which failure was probably a result of the widespread relief at having landed successfully at all].

Ground-air communication was by radio, and tactical air liaison units and their equipment tended to suffer the same fate as the paratroopers, which is they were rapidly put out-of-action by bad landings, enemy action or both. The two American parties who landed with 1st Airborne at Arnhem didn't survive the second day.

German light flak had a good reputation in combat, but this may have much to do with the ease of hitting numerous low & slow targets presented on a regular basis. Casualties in ground attack squadrons became heavier as the NW Europe campaign ground on, and its questionable whether they caused as much damage as they suffered performing this mission, exclusive of armed recon.

***
Sorry thats mainly Air Power at the Battlefront by Ian Gooderson. He has the story of the pile of British Army helmets thrown away by PoWs captured on Crete that was repeatedly attacked by German aircraft.

6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David J Schaffner
United States
Saint Louis
Missouri
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Corps artillery attachments were most always available for primary operations. Btw, my dad was a radio operator in the 82nd Airborne during WWII (he fought from Salerno thru the Bulge where he got frozen feet - due to his unit not being issued rubber galoshes before they rushed north thru Bastogne and towards the St. Vith area). In Normandy he netted in Asst. Div. CO Gavin for artillery support as the 325th Glider Inf. held a tenuous toe-hold on the opposite bank, after attacking across the La Fiere/Cauquigny causeway. Dad was going to write a book on his wartime experiences but died before finishing it.....he would have related this friendly fire [artillery] incident in it, as he witnessed it firsthand "cause and effect".
7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.