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Subject: thinking of start to paint some minis, any advices for a beginner ? rss

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Lyle Chipperson
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Looking at some of the awesome work you guys are doing with your minis I want to try my hand and painting, so, do you have any advice, trick ? Thanks in advance.

I can buy here the Tamiya paints are those ok?

 
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Bryan Lane
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Practice, more than anything. Your first model won't look as good as your 100th model.

I haven't worked with Tamiya paints before, but use acrylics rather than enamels.

Have a variety of brushes. Painting broad sections with a fine detail brush or tiny details with a wide brush will drive you insane.

If you want to start over, strip with Simple Green (just put them in a mason jar with enough SG to cover, leave over night, and rinse. Use a toothbrush to clear out the crevices).

Make sure you prime your models first. Sprays are quick and easy but difficult to get even coverage, and you generally want to do it outside where it's more difficult to regulate temperature/humidity. I've switched to gesso, which is pretty forgiving (it shrinks down as it dries so even with quite a bit, it's rare to occlude detail) and provides good "tooth" to paint on. Plus, since you're just painting it on, you can do it inside where you do the rest of your painting, and you don't have to worry about overspray.

After you paint some stuff, you'll want to start looking at new techniques to add to your repertoire. Wet blending, dry brushing, washing, OSL, etc. There's lots of blogs around that talk about more advanced techniques. I don't have a go-to site for this kind of stuff, but a quick google will turn up tutorial blogs, videos, etc.

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Jim Patching
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Don't be put off if your paint job looks like crap halfway through the process. Even the best mini painter's minis look crap before all the shading and highlighting is done.
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Lyle Chipperson
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I just found out what prime a miniature is, looks like this is gonna be more complicated than expected
 
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D. R.
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I was thinking of creating a similar topic but I wanted to know if there are any websites,videos or anything that walk step by step on any KD miniature.
 
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Kain
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Yeah. I have a tip. Don't paint KDM As your first practice run. I would jump on your other Boardgames to start, something with less detail maybe or less intimidating.

You could also do something stylistic, Nick around here has a very unique light source scheme going, it requires perspective but considerably less colour/detail focus.
 
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shaun getty

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Tamiya paints are ok not the best or worse, there other paints I would recommend out there. Tamiya does have some great colors and inks, that they have a place in painter box. Their surface primer gray is hand downs one of best ones out there. Its also very forgiven if you use to much.

Some general tips, search paint brands and read up on them not all paint is the same. The same hold true with primers, Games workshop good paints and has primers that are basically paint, same with army painter personal had mixed results with army painter spray primers. Reaper makes good paints, Vallejo (check spelling) they have great primers and paints. Scale 75 ( personal recommendation).

Their difference between paints enamel(don't recommend) Oil paints(avoid) and the last one Acrylic paints start with these ones.

Brushes,are investment treat them as such, start off with art and craft store ones to learn basics if brush care, than upgrade them to higher quality ones. The big difference between natural hair and synth ones, and price too. Some cheap art store ones have their place to, old brush are great for weathering, mixing, dry brushing , etc.

Setting up workspace, if possible is another thing that may help you. Good light source something sturdy to rest on, cheap newspaper to cover the area works fine.

Pallets wet and dry,these can be found cheaply in art& craft stores. Wet pallets will help when mixing and keeping paints fresh for longer painting sessions. Dry pallets are good for basic prep work and blocking. No need to use both one or the other should do.

Youtube painting videos, and watch and see what other paints are doing. Plus there online forums for miniature painting,check them out.

Airbrushes are different world, and another type of investment. If you like miniature painting and like the hobby they may be something to invest in.

If you can search eBay for cheap miniatures and if you can buy some of them, close to same scale as KDM, 28-35mm 54 mm learn on these ones, it doesn't matter how many times you prime and paint over them there learning tools. Also the spare KDM parts weapons, heads etc, when you feel ready try some stuff on them. Painting is skill and learning curve as well so practice before you touch your KDM stuff.

Whenever your start painting, first wash the miniatures in warm soapy water, to remove oils and casting agents, don't use super hot water as it will negatively effect the resin( if painting resin) and some plastics as well. A cheap toothbrush and some dawn soap works great, don't scrub to hard and break a piece off. Make sure you rinse them well, and dry them well.
 
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Dean L
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There's essentially three stages:

1) Priming: clean the model, and spray some special white paint over it. It's special paint that makes other paint stick better. You have to do this, but it's straightforward. An undercoat, essentially. Not really any skill involved, beyond not spraying too much/too close.

2) Basecoat: this is what you think of when you think of painting models. Get some colours, paint them on the right places. The better you get, the more detail you'll be able to do. Don't worry too much about being brilliant at this point. Try and limit yourself to 3-4 colours. You don't need to buy loads, you can mix your own (having a pre-mixed purple is really handy when you're painting an army over weeks and need the purples to all be consistent everywhere, you're not at this point, so can get away with Red, Green, Blue, Black and White. Though I'd get a brown, grey, flesh tone and a metallic too if you're painting stuff that needs them.)

3) Finish: get a generic dark brown wash (like Army Painter strong tone), and paint it all over the mini. A wash is a very thin paint that will seep into the crevices of the model an give a quick and easy shading effect. At this point, you'll probably be amazed at how good it looks for a first try.
If you're going to use it for play, seal it by spraying with matt varnish. If not, doesn't matter.

For step 2, you'll naturally just get better at painting more detail. For step 3 there are loads of techniques you can do, like selectively washing areas in different shades, highlighting, dry-brushing, stencilling, weathering... loads of stuff to learn, but I'd go with the basics, paint a few test models and get the hang of it, then when you come back to start reading up on more advanced stuff it won't all sound like nonsense!
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Drew Olds
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panzer-attack wrote:
Don't be put off if your paint job looks like crap halfway through the process. Even the best mini painter's minis look crap before all the shading and highlighting is done.


This is referred to as the ass stage (or ass point) of the process by top painters.
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Drew Olds
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Biggest piece of advise- DO NOT CALCULATE HOW LONG IT WILL TAKE TO PAINT YOUR COLLECTION!

The truth is, the first time you try any painting technique, it takes longer. As you improve at it, you'll take less and less time.



Also, once you're in a rhythm, it is easy to be intimidated into not trying new techniques. Instead, you should try new things, and add them to your skill set.

Just remember, each time you try something new, it will take longer than it ever will again.
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Sebastian
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don´t start with KDM!
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cador2 wrote:
don´t start with KDM!


Why not? As long as he uses acrylic paint it can easily be stripped off over and over with no negatives using simple green.
 
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My name is
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cormor321 wrote:
cador2 wrote:
don´t start with KDM!


Why not? As long as he uses acrylic paint it can easily be stripped off over and over with no negatives using simple green.


I don't know about you but I never succeeded in stripping off acrylic paint more than once on plastic minis.
After that, my minis start to be damaged.
 
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Lyle Chipperson
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Ok stupid question time, what if I don't prime the model? I read that on metallic ones the paint don't stick , is it the same case on the KDM ones ?
 
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baylock wrote:
cormor321 wrote:
cador2 wrote:
don´t start with KDM!


Why not? As long as he uses acrylic paint it can easily be stripped off over and over with no negatives using simple green.


I don't know about you but I never succeeded in stripping off acrylic paint more than once on plastic minis.
After that, my minis start to be damaged.


I've never done it tons of times to a single mini, but more than once has never seemed a problem. Do you spay prime? That tends to etch the plastic a bit with each applications and will cause damage if you strip and respray multiple times. I pretty much only use brush on.
 
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dgenclass wrote:
Ok stupid question time, what if I don't prime the model? I read that on metallic ones the paint don't stick , is it the same case on the KDM ones ?


Assuming you use acrylic, you don't need to prime with spray paint. You can use a brush on primer or even a solid layer of certain paints. Some paint colors/brands stick better than others on plastic though. I typically prime with a matte fluid acrylic then use reaper hd paints over that.
 
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Lyle Chipperson
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Hey, I'm usinq tamiya acrylic paints, do you mean I don't need the primer I can apply a first layer with the acrylic paints and then start the painting ?
 
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Cold Toilet Seat
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I agree with most of the other posters here: you might want to practice on another model/miniature before painting your KD:M miniatures. Additionally, if you're new to miniature painting in general, welcome! It's real neat and can be a lot of fun. Might be worthwhile to check out a YouTube video for some tips.

TL;DR: I recommend at least rinsing your miniatures before painting. Applying a thin coat of primer to the miniature before painting anything else is strongly recommended, but you can skip the primer step if you want (I wouldn't).

These are the steps I usually follow when painting a miniature or model:

* Wash the miniature with warm soapy water (regular dishwashing detergent is fine). Let them soak for @ 5 minutes or so then either let them air dry or dry them VERY GENTLY with a soft towel (KD:M miniatures are particularly delicate). The water doesn't have to be very hot. This step removes all the sealant and other stuff that coats the plastic as a result of the production process. If you skip this step, your paint might not stick to the miniature very well.

* OPTIONAL: Sand off any of the mold lines that run along the miniature. These look like "seams" along parts of the model. Also, use an X-acto knife to trim any of the "nubs" that resulted from trimming the parts off the sprues/runners.

* OPTIONAL (but recommended): Apply a thin coat of primer to the miniature. You can use a large-ish brush to apply primer or you can use a spray-on primer (Tamiya makes a good one, so does Testors). Outside/well-ventilated area... yada yada. If you skip the primer step, your paint might not stick to the miniature very well, particularly if the parts haven't been rinsed.

* Block out the "main" colors using whatever color you like. In the case of the KD:M survivors, I'd identify these as the hair, the skin, the cloth and the lantern.

* OPTIONAL: Apply highlights if you want. Drybrushing is a really easy technique that can look pretty good (a quick Google search will reveal a number of video tutorials on how to do it). You can also use what's called a "wash" (basically paint thinned-down with a bit of water) to create some shadows/shading. Takes a bit of practice, but is also surprisingly easy once you get the hang of it.

* OPTIONAL: Apply a coat of clear lacquer to your miniature after you're finished painting and satisfied with the way it looks. I use Testors Dullcote spray-on lacquer. This step will protect your miniature's paint job from the wear & tear of daily use.

I'm sorry if this sounds like a lot - I don't mean to dissuade you from painting your KD:M miniatures. I've been painting 40k miniatures and building models for awhile. It is a time-consuming process and can even be grueling sometimes. But the reward is well worth it! There's nothing like a table with fully-painted miniatures on the board! Best of luck on your painting adventure!

EDITS: Forgot a step and hopefully made it a bit more readable.
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dgenclass wrote:
Hey, I'm usinq tamiya acrylic paints, do you mean I don't need the primer I can apply a first layer with the acrylic paints and then start the painting ?


Yes, but you will find some colors will work as a primer while others won't. In reaper paints for example Brown Liner is a great primer, but Walnut Brown will come of very easily. It's easy to test using all the leftover sprue plastic though.

As Cold Toilet Seat said washing the plastic is a must. I'd recommend using a soft bristle toothbrush rather than just soaking though.
 
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Zen Man
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dgenclass wrote:
Looking at some of the awesome work you guys are doing with your minis I want to try my hand and painting, so, do you have any advice, trick ? Thanks in advance.

I can buy here the Tamiya paints are those ok?



Try with other miniatures to paint before moving on to KD:M to hone skills (these are expensive and you'd want them to look your best).
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Joseph Sharkey
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panzer-attack wrote:
Don't be put off if your paint job looks like crap halfway through the process. Even the best mini painter's minis look crap before all the shading and highlighting is done.


Hahah! This all the way!

Speaking as someone who only fairly recently started painting I can vouche for this so much. Although at the same time, as soon as you get that base coat on and a bit of wash the mini pops so much and you get a great sense of accomplishment.

That being said, I would NOT start with this game. Grab a cheaper game and one that you don't mind messing up on much, and practice on minis there. Get the hang of drybrushing and using washes in different ways. You will learn so much here even if you only go through a few. You don't have to do a ton, but burning a handful of minis of different sizes and types really helps.

I started with my copy of D&D Castle Ravenloft, and practiced different washes and drybrushing on each of the skeletons and gargoyles, then started on the Golem guy for trying to do a bit more detail and trying to understand layering. It helped a ton to cement what I had been learning from youtube vids and tips/advice on here After that I went to painting some of my bigger stuff in Cthulhu Wars. Just give yourself some no pressure practice, no need to worry about finishing all those practice minis, just get the practice in and you will be so thankful for it later.

Oh, and definitely do NOT allow yourself to calculate the time needed to paint your collection/games. You will seriously put yourself off. It definitely takes longer than you will see in painting tutorial vids of people (it is still taking me a few hours just to do base coats and touch ups on ~5-10 minis depending on size, whereas I watch tutorials where people go through the entire zombicide game box in ~5-6hrs). Don't let it get to you. If you enjoy it keep with it, if you don't then don't get bummed out and force yourself. Take it slow and don't burn yourself out.

These are some of the vids that got me interested and to give painting a try: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5_huIQnbtjDhCyMvbZLo...

Grab some cheap brushes, some Americana or FolkArt acrylic paints for your practice stuff, and get the hang. Once you know you like it and are in it for the long haul, go grab some Citadel paints or other higher class paints. I would still not touch pricier brushes till you get the hang of it, as you will ruin and mess up your brushes plenty early on (hell, I still am) so do so with cheaper brushes before you get anything fancy (oh and super small brush is not always the answer to getting small details, they can just make it a pain... learned that the hard way.). I would say that grabbing a good brush for washes is a safe and worthwhile investments though as you will only use that for washes and it is almost impossible to ruin a brush doing that as they are so easy to clean out of the bristles and no worry about getting in the base of the bristles.

Check on craigslist or ebay for paints occasionally. Plenty of people get out of the hobby and you can get a nice deal on a large amount of nice paints on occasion.

Get a good table light and/or a magnifying glass light, it helps immensely and can be gotten for very cheap.


HAVE FUN!
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Jason Hofstedt
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Considering the fact that the minis for KD:M come in many pieces, they're ideal for airbrushing. While I'm likely going to go with a simplistic, single-color paint job, just to cover seams and provide a nice finish, I'll probably still do it with an airbrush. I'm surprised everyone seems to be hand painting these pieces. No love for nozzles?
 
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Steve Trewartha
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Jasonhofstedt wrote:
Considering the fact that the minis for KD:M come in many pieces, they're ideal for airbrushing. While I'm likely going to go with a simplistic, single-color paint job, just to cover seams and provide a nice finish, I'll probably still do it with an airbrush. I'm surprised everyone seems to be hand painting these pieces. No love for nozzles?


Not an airbrush user at all myself, but I think in general the survivors are a bit too small and fiddly to airbrush easily.

Scott Hockley made a great series of painting guides. They use fairly advanced techniques, but you will at least get some of the terminology to search for and it includes preparing the model.

http://gallery.kingdomdeath.com/Architect-Advanced-Painting-...

Coolminiornot forums are a good resource as well. They have a sticky thread index to loads of great tutorials. Anything warhammer should find you a lot of tutorials. Read up a few guides including preparation (its more important than most people think) then give it a go, take a few clear photos and post them somewhere then get some feedback. Always remember to thin your paints. It is better to do several thin layers than 1 thick layer.
 
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Bryan Lane
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I've seen a couple of people suggest sealing with a spray sealant when you're finished. This is a good tip, but if you're going to do this try to find a way to do it where you can control the humidity. Using a spray sealant in high humidity causes the sealant to "fog up" giving your model a frosted look which is likely undesirable.

Generally speaking, humidity plays hell with sprays.
 
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Blaine French

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I did a thread a while back that walks you through a simple but nice paint job. Warning it's pic heavy. Won't win you a crystal brush, but will wow your friends

https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/1553402/kdm-painting-tutori...
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