Steven Woodcock
United States
Unspecified
Unspecified
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Excellent news:

http://www.businessinsider.com/caelus-oil-discovery-in-alask...
2 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Frank F
United States
Texas
flag msg tools
IF YOU WANT IT
badge
Please investigate a resource based economy.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I think this or similar oil field discoveries were made many years ago but were suppressed in order to keep domestic oil prices artificially high. Of course, continuing to extract and burn carbon for energy is the suicidal/genocidal/ecocidal agenda of the monetary system and should be opposed and avoided at every opportunity.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Dearlove
United Kingdom
Isleworth
Middx
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Koldfoot wrote:
LightRider wrote:
I think this or similar oil field discoveries were made many years ago but were suppressed in order to keep domestic oil prices artificially high. Of course, continuing to extract and burn carbon for energy is the suicidal/genocidal/ecocidal agenda of the monetary system and should be opposed and avoided at every opportunity.


To be clear.

You think a massive oil discovery was made and the finders didn't snatch up the oil leases on that land? They kept it quiet and allowed a wildcatter to make the money?

He's a mad conspiracy theorist who has no grasp of economics so don't worry about him.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jon Badolato
United States
Connecticut
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
If true it would be good for low oil prices but bad in the long term for humanity as AGW gets worse with time. The more oil they find, the more the right wingnuts will delay opportunities to move to more sustainable energy sources. Sadly, the American business community is often after short term gains and doesn't take into account long term consequences.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Born To Lose, Live To Win
United States
South Euclid
Ohio
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Koldfoot wrote:
To be clear.

You think a massive oil discovery was made and the finders didn't snatch up the oil leases on that land? They kept it quiet and allowed a wildcatter to make the money?
I have virtually no information on this, but the first article I read said these were existing leases. Was that a first-report inaccuracy? It only only stuck out to me because I have always said that oil companies weren't doing much with their existing leases, yet everyone was complaining because we wouldn't let them have more.
1 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Oliver Dienz
United States
Shelburne
Vermont
flag msg tools
From the article:

Quote:
In total the site is expected to hold 6 billion to 10 billion barrels of oil, of which about 2.4 billion are recoverable.

To put that into perspective:

Quote:
In 2015, the United States consumed a total of 7.08 billion barrels of petroleum products, an average of about 19.4 million barrels per day.2

https://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.cfm?id=33&t=6

So we get roughly another year assuming we somehow manage to pull out pretty much all the oil that's predicted to be there and have a constant demand.

What would we think of castaways stranded on a remote island that indulge on their limited food rations while only putting in a token effort to look for other food sources?
1 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Shawn Fox
United States
Richardson
Texas
flag msg tools
Question everything.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Drew1365 wrote:
Ah yeah. Remember a decade ago when we were told by all the smart progressives that we'd reached "peak oil."

Hopefully you'll put reminders on your gravestone that you didn't believe in global warming and thought there was infinite oil in the ground so that future generations can piss on your grave.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls

Pennsylvania
msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Drew1365 wrote:
Ah yeah. Remember a decade ago when we were told by all the smart progressives that we'd reached "peak oil."


Yes, and at one point the doctors told your parents you weren't mentally challenged.

Shit changes with new data points, especially for a complex calculation such as peak oil.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Oliver Dienz
United States
Shelburne
Vermont
flag msg tools
Drew1365 wrote:
Ah yeah. Remember a decade ago when we were told by all the smart progressives that we'd reached "peak oil."


If there is no peak oil why has production of conventional (aka cheap to get) crude been flat for a good 10 years despite sky-high prices during most of that time?


Shale oil, tight oil, tar sands etc. mean we are scraping now at the bottom of the barrel to get the last remnants out.

Production of crude oil from conventional fields contracts by about 2 to 3 mill. barrels per day every year. That's the amount of oil from new fields we need to bring online just to keep supplies flat. Essentially we have to find a new Saudi Arabia every 4 to 5 years. Contrast that with this new "great" find:
Quote:
In a press release on Tuesday the independent exploration and production company said the site could provide up to 200,000 barrels of "light, highly mobile oil" a day.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mac Mcleod
United States
houston
Texas
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
odie73 wrote:
From the article:

Quote:
In total the site is expected to hold 6 billion to 10 billion barrels of oil, of which about 2.4 billion are recoverable.

To put that into perspective:

Quote:
In 2015, the United States consumed a total of 7.08 billion barrels of petroleum products, an average of about 19.4 million barrels per day.2

https://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.cfm?id=33&t=6

So we get roughly another year assuming we somehow manage to pull out pretty much all the oil that's predicted to be there and have a constant demand.

What would we think of castaways stranded on a remote island that indulge on their limited food rations while only putting in a token effort to look for other food sources?


We have plenty of canned food.. why should we plant a farm?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.