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Will Pearson
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Leicester
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Maybe it's just my eyes (I can't distinguish shades of green very well) but is there a clear way to tell when bocage is light or heavy? I've been gauging it by if there's little dots (trees?) in the hex or not.

Also does elevation matter at all if there's no slope hexsides? Seeing several hexes where there's clearly a drop but no slope marker (guessing that's just due to the scale of the map).
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Mark Mokszycki
United States
Snohomish
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The shade of green is indeed the main indicator of terrain type: light, medium, or dark. We color-blind tested the map so that the tints aren't important. Only the brightness is relevant. We also viewed the map in black & white to make sure that it was (hopefully) clear whether the underlying color was light, medium, or dark.

I've noticed that using a "true spectrum" light bulb, or natural daylight, makes an enormous difference when viewing the map, as some of the warm-spectrum bulbs sold for indoor use make greens look brownish and murky. They sell warm-spectrum bulbs because they're supposed to make food look more appetizing or some such thing... but their rosy tint plays hell on the green OpD map.

The other indicators for light vs. heavy bocage are indeed the orchard-style trees (the little dots) and the relative amount of hedgerows represented (though the latter isn't the best gauge since the orientation of hedgerows also factored into the classification as light or heavy bocage).

Elevation is only relevant across slope hexsides. The slopes were placed according to the actual LOS situation between regions of the battlefield. They do not indicate actual elevation in most cases.

Good luck!
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Will Pearson
England
Leicester
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Ah, I didn't make the link between hex colour and terrain (don't think I saw it in the rulebook?) pretty much conditioned to think it was elevation.

Have to use those bulbs anyway, issue is my Irlens lenses also happen to be dark green, with or without them I couldn't make out many of the details inside any of the darker hexes. Can tell the colours apart and woods from heavy bocage, so no problems now.

Loving the game though, just gutted I missed out on RW by a whisker.
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Mark Mokszycki
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The map section of the Reference Book (pg 18) sheds some light on the reasoning behind the 3-tier green gradient:

"At first glance, the map terrain might appear to change abruptly in order to conform to the hex grid. But a closer look reveals that the houses, orchards, and hedgerows flow rather freely across the hex grid; it’s the classification of cover as light, medium, or heavy that conforms to the hex grid, as denoted by three shades of green. When viewed from a distance, these three shades might be misinterpreted as elevation or terrain type. I realize that this might be hard for folks to wrap their heads around at first (i.e., the fact that the color represents a broad classification affecting defense and movement rather than elevation or a specific terrain type). While this approach to the map is admittedly unusual, I felt it was the best way to portray the needed information in a highly functional manner. The underlying terrain classification needed to be visible even when there were four counters side-by-side in a hex. After printing up some playtest versions, I realized that, if the hexes were large enough and I used color-coding, the color could be seen rather easily in the excess space around the counters. Doing it this way meant there was no need to pick up the counters to see what was underneath—even when the hex was fully stacked. "
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