Recommend
3 
 Thumb up
 Hide
48 Posts
1 , 2  Next »   | 

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Everything Else » Religion, Sex, and Politics

Subject: Survey Finds Most American Christians Are Actually Heretics rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
fightcitymayor
United States
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
badge
Proprietor and Chairman Emeritus of The Naughty Palace
Avatar
mb
http://thefederalist.com/2016/10/10/survey-finds-american-ch...

This smacks of "No true Christian" but since that is the game they play, I say "Play on, player!"
I guess it helps explain evangelical Trump supporters a little bit better.

Quote:
Evangelical writer Eric Metaxas remarked on BreakPoint last week that if Americans took a theology exam, their only hope of passing would be if God graded on a curve. He’s right. In knowing both the content of the Bible and the doctrinal foundations of Christianity, we Americans aren’t just at the bottom of our class. We are, as Ross Douthat argues in his book, “Bad Religion,” a nation of heretics.

A survey of 3,000 people conducted by LifeWay Research and commissioned by Ligonier Ministries found that although Americans still overwhelmingly identify as “Christian,” startling percentages of the nation embrace ancient errors condemned by all major Christian traditions. These are not minor points of doctrine, but core ideas that define Christianity itself. The really sad part? Even when we’re denying the divinity of Christ, we can’t keep our story straight. Americans talking about theology sound about as competent as country singers rapping.

We’re an Embarrassment to Heretics Everywhere

Seven out of ten respondents in LifeWay’s survey affirmed the doctrine of the Trinity—that the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are three Persons but one God, and six in ten agreed that Jesus is both human and divine. Their orthodoxy—and consistency—ended there. More than half went on to indicate that Jesus is “the first and greatest being created by God,” a heresy known as Arianism, which the Council of Nicaea condemned in 325 A.D.

Of course, most of these accidental blasphemers aren’t preparing to revise the resulting Nicene Creed and preach a creaturely Christ. Rather, bizarre contradictions like this illustrate how many Americans don’t understand or even care what the Trinity means (although they say they believe in it, likely out of habits learned growing up in church).

The responses to other questions were no less heterodox or headache-inducing. Seventy percent of participants—who ranged across socioeconomic and racial backgrounds—agreed there’s only one true God. Yet sixty-four percent also thought this God accepts the worship of all religions, including those that believe in many gods.

Two-thirds admitted that everyone sins a little bit, but still insisted that most people are good by nature, which directly contradicts scripture (See “All have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God,” and “The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked: who can know it?”). Over half said it’s fair for God to exercise his wrath against sin, but seemed to waffle about which sins deserved wrath (not theirs!). Seventy-four percent said the “smallest sins” don’t warrant eternal damnation, in contrast to Jesus’ brother, who when writing at the Holy Spirit’s inspiration taught that even one infraction of God’s law is enough to sink someone. But really, what did he know?

A full 60 percent agreed that “everyone eventually goes to heaven,” but half of those surveyed also checked the box saying that “only those who believe in Jesus will be saved.” So either these folks are saying everyone will eventually believe in Jesus, or they hired a monkey to take the survey for them.


And this wasn't a random sampling of self-professed Christians, this was a targeted set of true "evangelicals."

Quote:
Evangelicals Didn’t Even Study for This Test

So this year, LifeWay used more stringent criteria for evangelical faith, as defined by some group called the National Association of Evangelicals. Only participants who called the Bible their highest authority, said personal evangelism is important, and indicated that trusting in Jesus’ death on the cross is the only way of salvation, were labeled “evangelical.” They totaled 586 survey-takers.

Everyone expected them to perform better than most Americans. No one expected them to perform worse. Seven in ten evangelicals—more than the population at large—said that Jesus was the first being God created. Fifty-six percent agreed that “the Holy Spirit is a divine force but not a personal being.” They also saw a huge increase in evangelicals (28 percent, up from 9 percent) who indicated that the Third Person of the Trinity is not equal with God the Father or Jesus, a direct contradiction of orthodox Christianity. The Holy Spirit is, of course, used to being overlooked. But sources say he seemed bummed about these results.

As before, it’s really the contradictory answers, not the outright heresies, that should most concern us. By definition, the evangelicals in this survey believed that “only those who trust in Jesus Christ alone as their Savior receive God’s free gift of eternal salvation.” Yet nearly half agreed that “God accepts the worship of all religions including Christianity, Judaism, and Islam.”

Two-thirds of evangelicals—more than Americans in general—said heaven is a place where all people will ultimately be reunited with their loved ones. That such a high percentage of Billy Graham’s camp is now talking like Rob Bell isn’t even the real story. The most striking thing is how many of these folks evidently see no contradiction between their casual universalism and the evangelical creed that salvation comes through faith in Christ alone.
8 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Christopher Seguin
United States
Cleveland
Ohio
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
fightcitymayor wrote:
http://thefederalist.com/2016/10/10/survey-finds-american-ch...

This smacks of "No true Christian" but since that is the game they play, I say "Play on, player!"
I guess it helps explain evangelical Trump supporters a little bit better.

Quote:
Evangelical writer Eric Metaxas remarked on BreakPoint last week that if Americans took a theology exam, their only hope of passing would be if God graded on a curve. He’s right. In knowing both the content of the Bible and the doctrinal foundations of Christianity, we Americans aren’t just at the bottom of our class. We are, as Ross Douthat argues in his book, “Bad Religion,” a nation of heretics.

A survey of 3,000 people conducted by LifeWay Research and commissioned by Ligonier Ministries found that although Americans still overwhelmingly identify as “Christian,” startling percentages of the nation embrace ancient errors condemned by all major Christian traditions. These are not minor points of doctrine, but core ideas that define Christianity itself. The really sad part? Even when we’re denying the divinity of Christ, we can’t keep our story straight. Americans talking about theology sound about as competent as country singers rapping.

We’re an Embarrassment to Heretics Everywhere

Seven out of ten respondents in LifeWay’s survey affirmed the doctrine of the Trinity—that the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are three Persons but one God, and six in ten agreed that Jesus is both human and divine. Their orthodoxy—and consistency—ended there. More than half went on to indicate that Jesus is “the first and greatest being created by God,” a heresy known as Arianism, which the Council of Nicaea condemned in 325 A.D.

Of course, most of these accidental blasphemers aren’t preparing to revise the resulting Nicene Creed and preach a creaturely Christ. Rather, bizarre contradictions like this illustrate how many Americans don’t understand or even care what the Trinity means (although they say they believe in it, likely out of habits learned growing up in church).

The responses to other questions were no less heterodox or headache-inducing. Seventy percent of participants—who ranged across socioeconomic and racial backgrounds—agreed there’s only one true God. Yet sixty-four percent also thought this God accepts the worship of all religions, including those that believe in many gods.

Two-thirds admitted that everyone sins a little bit, but still insisted that most people are good by nature, which directly contradicts scripture (See “All have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God,” and “The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked: who can know it?”). Over half said it’s fair for God to exercise his wrath against sin, but seemed to waffle about which sins deserved wrath (not theirs!). Seventy-four percent said the “smallest sins” don’t warrant eternal damnation, in contrast to Jesus’ brother, who when writing at the Holy Spirit’s inspiration taught that even one infraction of God’s law is enough to sink someone. But really, what did he know?

A full 60 percent agreed that “everyone eventually goes to heaven,” but half of those surveyed also checked the box saying that “only those who believe in Jesus will be saved.” So either these folks are saying everyone will eventually believe in Jesus, or they hired a monkey to take the survey for them.


And this wasn't a random sampling of self-professed Christians, this was a targeted set of true "evangelicals."

Quote:
Evangelicals Didn’t Even Study for This Test

So this year, LifeWay used more stringent criteria for evangelical faith, as defined by some group called the National Association of Evangelicals. Only participants who called the Bible their highest authority, said personal evangelism is important, and indicated that trusting in Jesus’ death on the cross is the only way of salvation, were labeled “evangelical.” They totaled 586 survey-takers.

Everyone expected them to perform better than most Americans. No one expected them to perform worse. Seven in ten evangelicals—more than the population at large—said that Jesus was the first being God created. Fifty-six percent agreed that “the Holy Spirit is a divine force but not a personal being.” They also saw a huge increase in evangelicals (28 percent, up from 9 percent) who indicated that the Third Person of the Trinity is not equal with God the Father or Jesus, a direct contradiction of orthodox Christianity. The Holy Spirit is, of course, used to being overlooked. But sources say he seemed bummed about these results.

As before, it’s really the contradictory answers, not the outright heresies, that should most concern us. By definition, the evangelicals in this survey believed that “only those who trust in Jesus Christ alone as their Savior receive God’s free gift of eternal salvation.” Yet nearly half agreed that “God accepts the worship of all religions including Christianity, Judaism, and Islam.”

Two-thirds of evangelicals—more than Americans in general—said heaven is a place where all people will ultimately be reunited with their loved ones. That such a high percentage of Billy Graham’s camp is now talking like Rob Bell isn’t even the real story. The most striking thing is how many of these folks evidently see no contradiction between their casual universalism and the evangelical creed that salvation comes through faith in Christ alone.


Some fascinating stuff. Thanks for sharing.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Daniel
United States
Santee
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Most of American "Christianity" does not follow the God of the Bible. They just follow Moralistic Therapeutic Deism with splashes of charismatic prosperity gospel and zionistic dispensationalism that solidifies their view that God's chosen people is America.

The Babylon Bee has some great ones on Joel Osteen.

http://babylonbee.com/?s=joel+osteen
http://babylonbee.com/news/inspired-patriotic-service-local-...
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
fightcitymayor
United States
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
badge
Proprietor and Chairman Emeritus of The Naughty Palace
Avatar
mb
chrisnd wrote:
Some fascinating stuff. Thanks for sharing.
I figured some of the more evangelical types could take it from here.

I know I have had conversations with evangelical friends who basically say I am toast when Jesus returns (I was told I would be left behind at The Rapture) but I have to wonder what "true evangelicals" think about the part-time Christians referenced in the article who sort of, kind of, almost belong to the team, but kinda don't.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Daniel
United States
Santee
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
fightcitymayor wrote:
chrisnd wrote:
Some fascinating stuff. Thanks for sharing.
I figured some of the more evangelical types could take it from here.

I know I have had conversations with evangelical friends who basically say I am toast when Jesus returns (I was told I would be left behind at The Rapture) but I have to wonder what "true evangelicals" think about the part-time Christians referenced in the article who sort of, kind of, almost belong to the team, but kinda don't.


The problem with the term "evangelical" is that it is squishy. It can be molded and taken up as a mantle by anyone. The Jesus movement in the 70s really started the non-denominational and anti-creed craze (especially with the Calvary Chapel movement-- which if you ask them they are NOT a denomination). I think evangelical was a term that was picked up mid 20th century to kind of sum up "orthodox" and "conservative" and "evangelizing" Christians but it had no real definition as to what made them "orthodox".
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Robert Stuart
United States
Los Alamos
New Mexico
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
fightcitymayor wrote:
http://thefederalist.com/2016/10/10/survey-finds-american-ch...

This smacks of "No true Christian" but since that is the game they play, I say "Play on, player!"
I guess it helps explain evangelical Trump supporters a little bit better.

Quote:
Evangelical writer Eric Metaxas remarked on BreakPoint last week that if Americans took a theology exam, their only hope of passing would be if God graded on a curve. He’s right. In knowing both the content of the Bible and the doctrinal foundations of Christianity, we Americans aren’t just at the bottom of our class. We are, as Ross Douthat argues in his book, “Bad Religion,” a nation of heretics.

A survey of 3,000 people conducted by LifeWay Research and commissioned by Ligonier Ministries found that although Americans still overwhelmingly identify as “Christian,” startling percentages of the nation embrace ancient errors condemned by all major Christian traditions. These are not minor points of doctrine, but core ideas that define Christianity itself. The really sad part? Even when we’re denying the divinity of Christ, we can’t keep our story straight. Americans talking about theology sound about as competent as country singers rapping.

We’re an Embarrassment to Heretics Everywhere

Seven out of ten respondents in LifeWay’s survey affirmed the doctrine of the Trinity—that the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are three Persons but one God, and six in ten agreed that Jesus is both human and divine. Their orthodoxy—and consistency—ended there. More than half went on to indicate that Jesus is “the first and greatest being created by God,” a heresy known as Arianism, which the Council of Nicaea condemned in 325 A.D.

Of course, most of these accidental blasphemers aren’t preparing to revise the resulting Nicene Creed and preach a creaturely Christ. Rather, bizarre contradictions like this illustrate how many Americans don’t understand or even care what the Trinity means (although they say they believe in it, likely out of habits learned growing up in church).

The responses to other questions were no less heterodox or headache-inducing. Seventy percent of participants—who ranged across socioeconomic and racial backgrounds—agreed there’s only one true God. Yet sixty-four percent also thought this God accepts the worship of all religions, including those that believe in many gods.

Two-thirds admitted that everyone sins a little bit, but still insisted that most people are good by nature, which directly contradicts scripture (See “All have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God,” and “The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked: who can know it?”). Over half said it’s fair for God to exercise his wrath against sin, but seemed to waffle about which sins deserved wrath (not theirs!). Seventy-four percent said the “smallest sins” don’t warrant eternal damnation, in contrast to Jesus’ brother, who when writing at the Holy Spirit’s inspiration taught that even one infraction of God’s law is enough to sink someone. But really, what did he know?

A full 60 percent agreed that “everyone eventually goes to heaven,” but half of those surveyed also checked the box saying that “only those who believe in Jesus will be saved.” So either these folks are saying everyone will eventually believe in Jesus, or they hired a monkey to take the survey for them.


And this wasn't a random sampling of self-professed Christians, this was a targeted set of true "evangelicals."

Quote:
Evangelicals Didn’t Even Study for This Test

So this year, LifeWay used more stringent criteria for evangelical faith, as defined by some group called the National Association of Evangelicals. Only participants who called the Bible their highest authority, said personal evangelism is important, and indicated that trusting in Jesus’ death on the cross is the only way of salvation, were labeled “evangelical.” They totaled 586 survey-takers.

Everyone expected them to perform better than most Americans. No one expected them to perform worse. Seven in ten evangelicals—more than the population at large—said that Jesus was the first being God created. Fifty-six percent agreed that “the Holy Spirit is a divine force but not a personal being.” They also saw a huge increase in evangelicals (28 percent, up from 9 percent) who indicated that the Third Person of the Trinity is not equal with God the Father or Jesus, a direct contradiction of orthodox Christianity. The Holy Spirit is, of course, used to being overlooked. But sources say he seemed bummed about these results.

As before, it’s really the contradictory answers, not the outright heresies, that should most concern us. By definition, the evangelicals in this survey believed that “only those who trust in Jesus Christ alone as their Savior receive God’s free gift of eternal salvation.” Yet nearly half agreed that “God accepts the worship of all religions including Christianity, Judaism, and Islam.”

Two-thirds of evangelicals—more than Americans in general—said heaven is a place where all people will ultimately be reunited with their loved ones. That such a high percentage of Billy Graham’s camp is now talking like Rob Bell isn’t even the real story. The most striking thing is how many of these folks evidently see no contradiction between their casual universalism and the evangelical creed that salvation comes through faith in Christ alone.


I've started reading a fascinating book, "The Territories of Science and Religion", which I would recommend to everyone interested in this topic.

What emerges from the author's analysis is that early-to-medieval Christian belief was far more nuanced than the later Puritan doctrinal assertions which, of course, drew on the same scripture. The above-mentioned survey simply shows that the beliefs of Christians in general, and evangelicals in particular, are closer to those of the early and medieval church than to Puritan literalist doctrine.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Robert Wesley
Nepal
Aberdeen
Washington
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mb
Re: Survey Finds Most American Christians Are Actually Heretics at their BEST
wow ~"...You, you HUMAN 'paraquat'!"
~"Well, aren't YOU?"
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
non sequitur
United States
Elk Point
South Dakota (SD)
flag msg tools
Mandelbrot/Simurgh hybrid etc etc
badge
I made both of these fractals, hurray!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
fightcitymayor wrote:
chrisnd wrote:
Some fascinating stuff. Thanks for sharing.
I figured some of the more evangelical types could take it from here.

I know I have had conversations with evangelical friends who basically say I am toast when Jesus returns (I was told I would be left behind at The Rapture) but I have to wonder what "true evangelicals" think about the part-time Christians referenced in the article who sort of, kind of, almost belong to the team, but kinda don't.


They'd say it's important that you recognize Jesus is the only path to salvation, and if you've made it that far it's ok to mess up on some details. Src: Evangelical upbringing.

Also, it's entirely bizarre how the meaning of evangelical has shifted away from the original intent.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
J.D. Hall
United States
Oklahoma
flag msg tools
And this is why I don't attend a church (or temple or mosque, whatever). Who are these assholes to tell me how I should connect to God? Yeah, take those "holy" books written by "divinely-inspired" guys and shove them up your ass. It's all a giant load of crap.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Daniel
United States
Santee
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I hears this poll was scientific:

http://babylonbee.com/news/majority-nations-christians-belie...
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls

Pennsylvania
msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Terwox wrote:
fightcitymayor wrote:
chrisnd wrote:
Some fascinating stuff. Thanks for sharing.
I figured some of the more evangelical types could take it from here.

I know I have had conversations with evangelical friends who basically say I am toast when Jesus returns (I was told I would be left behind at The Rapture) but I have to wonder what "true evangelicals" think about the part-time Christians referenced in the article who sort of, kind of, almost belong to the team, but kinda don't.


They'd say it's important that you recognize Jesus is the only path to salvation, and if you've made it that far it's ok to mess up on some details. Src: Evangelical upbringing.

Also, it's entirely bizarre how the meaning of evangelical has shifted away from the original intent.


But I gots the cookie, drank the grape drink, and still didn't get the golden ticket to attend the Eternal Soul Dance Remix Gatherin.

Fuck!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mac Mcleod
United States
houston
Texas
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
dandechino wrote:
Most of American "Christianity" does not follow the God of the Bible. They just follow Moralistic Therapeutic Deism with splashes of charismatic prosperity gospel and zionistic dispensationalism that solidifies their view that God's chosen people is America.

The Babylon Bee has some great ones on Joel Osteen.

http://babylonbee.com/?s=joel+osteen
http://babylonbee.com/news/inspired-patriotic-service-local-...


I thought surely this was a joke site like the onion so I checked some of the stories and it looks like a real site.

Here is an inspirational story from the site.
http://babylonbee.com/news/tim-tebow-hit-pitch-charges-mound...
Quote:

Tim Tebow Hit By Pitch, Charges Mound To Offer Instant Forgiveness

PORT ST. LUCIE, FL—Playing in his second instructional league baseball game with the New York Mets organization Thursday, Tim Tebow was hit by a pitch from lefty Chandler Hawkins during his third at bat. According to witnesses, the former NFL player immediately threw down his bat and aggressively charged the pitcher’s mound—but rather than engaging in the traditional fistfight or shoving match, Tebow rushed out to immediately forgive Hawkins face to face.

“I ran out there because I knew he probably felt bad about plunking me, and I wanted to pursue immediate reconciliation,” Tebow told reporters. “The Bible teaches that if your brother has something against you, drop everything and go restore the relationship. I needed to reach out to Chandler right away and forgive him for drilling me in the rib cage with that fastball.”
Get the Bee delivered straight to your inbox.

Witnesses state that Tebow, listed at 6’3”, 255 pounds, held out his arms as he approached the mound at a full sprint. Hawkins, apparently confused by the gesture, dropped his glove and raised his fists, but Tebow immediately wrapped him up in a bear hug.

“I told him it was OK, everyone makes mistakes, and his defensiveness just melted away,” said Tebow. “The Bible says to go to your brother and settle your grievances one-on-one, but if that fails, to bring 2 or 3 brothers with you the next time. I guess that’s why a lot of my teammates came running out of the dugout. They wanted to make sure we followed the Biblical model of reconciliation. I love these guys.”

According to reports, the umpire had to break up the meeting to continue the game, as Tebow remained on the mound telling Hawkins how to receive forgiveness for his sins through a relationship with Jesus Christ.


http://www.christiantoday.com/article/tim.tebow.offers.forgi...

This makes the stories about joel olsteen, a preacher, not knowing about basic christian dogma disturbing.

But I feel so happy after reading a story like this about Tebow. I wish that was the kind of story I read about christians all the time.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Daniel
United States
Santee
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I'm standing 10 feet away from the guy who wrote that piece. Not sure what to make of that Christian Today piece. Snopes has had to post on several things the Bee has gotten out there.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Christopher Dearlove
United Kingdom
Chelmsford
Essex
flag msg tools
SoRCon 8 27 Feb - 1 Mar 2015 Basildon UK http://www.sorcon.co.uk Essex Games 27 Jul '15
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Look up the heresy of Americanism as denounced by Pope Leo XIII.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Junior McSpiffy
United States
Riverton
Utah
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
fightcitymayor wrote:
chrisnd wrote:
Some fascinating stuff. Thanks for sharing.
I figured some of the more evangelical types could take it from here.

I know I have had conversations with evangelical friends who basically say I am toast when Jesus returns (I was told I would be left behind at The Rapture) but I have to wonder what "true evangelicals" think about the part-time Christians referenced in the article who sort of, kind of, almost belong to the team, but kinda don't.


The interesting part for me is that they get to define what is or isn't a heretic. There are theologic debates of great depth about any number of subjects.... but if you don't agree with some quiz-thrower-togetherers, then you are a heretic.

I am certain I would be a heretic by their standards, but I also am certain I am more in line with Biblical teachings than anything which starts with Swiss Army God as their starting point. So I can live with being a heretic. By their standards.

There you go.... the yummy, yummy infighting you so craved.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Moshe Callen
Israel
Jerusalem
flag msg tools
designer
ἄνδρα μοι ἔννεπε, μοῦσα, πολύτροπον, ὃς μάλα πολλὰ/ πλάγχθη, ἐπεὶ Τροίης ἱερὸν πτολίεθρον ἔπερσεν./...
badge
μῆνιν ἄειδε θεὰ Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος/ οὐλομένην, ἣ μυρί᾽ Ἀχαιοῖς ἄλγε᾽ ἔθηκε,/...
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
1. So this isn't from the Onion?

2. From the time of Paul whose letters virtually all condemn things which are now accepted as standard, yesterday's heresy is again and again throughout Christian history today's standard theology. Admittedly not all heresies reached that threshold but many did.

EDIT:
This is healthy and normal. Every religion must evolve or it will become irrelevant to its potential adherents.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mac Mcleod
United States
houston
Texas
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
dandechino wrote:
I'm standing 10 feet away from the guy who wrote that piece. Not sure what to make of that Christian Today piece. Snopes has had to post on several things the Bee has gotten out there.


Oh crap... Are you saying that the Bee site is fake and a christian site quoted them? Many, many sites are quoting the story about Tebow and it wasn't on snopes.

Sigh.

I fukin hate that.

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
fightcitymayor
United States
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
badge
Proprietor and Chairman Emeritus of The Naughty Palace
Avatar
mb
GameCrossing wrote:
The interesting part for me is that they get to define what is or isn't a heretic. There are theologic debates of great depth about any number of subjects.... but if you don't agree with some quiz-thrower-togetherers, then you are a heretic.
From the POV of the article-writer it seems like the questions asked were closer to 'Evangelical Christianity 101' than any sort of medieval theological deep-dive session. Thus his clucking.

GameCrossing wrote:
There you go.... the yummy, yummy infighting you so craved.
Not sure the OP was concerned with "in-fighting" and I would characterize it more as moral clucking of the 'tsk-tsk-tsk!' variety.

But you're Mormon, so this guy would probably totally hate your guts anyway.
But look on the bright side: The same evangelicals that doomed me to being left behind said you nutty Mormons would be too, so apparently we will have each other to cling to while we weep and gnash our teeth!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Junior McSpiffy
United States
Riverton
Utah
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
fightcitymayor wrote:
GameCrossing wrote:
The interesting part for me is that they get to define what is or isn't a heretic. There are theologic debates of great depth about any number of subjects.... but if you don't agree with some quiz-thrower-togetherers, then you are a heretic.
From the POV of the article-writer it seems like the questions asked were closer to 'Evangelical Christianity 101' than any sort of medieval theological deep-dive session. Thus his clucking.


Yeah, I got that on my second read once I dropped my normal level of defensiveness. It was more about how much someone knows about what they claim to believe rather than knowing doctrine. Evangelicals knowing evangelicalism rather than knowing broader Christian theology and where their faith fits in that.

But, since I have to make everything Mormon-centric, it makes me wonder how well my tribe would score on a quiz like that geared at our own beliefs. I would like to think fairly well... but I suspect evangelicals would think that about themselves.

fightcitymayor wrote:
GameCrossing wrote:
There you go.... the yummy, yummy infighting you so craved.
Not sure the OP was concerned with "in-fighting" and I would characterize it more as moral clucking of the 'tsk-tsk-tsk!' variety.

But you're Mormon, so this guy would probably totally hate your guts anyway.
But look on the bright side: The same evangelicals that doomed me to being left behind said you nutty Mormons would be too, so apparently we will have each other to cling to while we weep and gnash our teeth!


Just because we ain't going to heaven doesn't mean I'm gonna turn gay!

Does it?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
fightcitymayor
United States
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
badge
Proprietor and Chairman Emeritus of The Naughty Palace
Avatar
mb
GameCrossing wrote:
Just because we ain't going to heaven doesn't mean I'm gonna turn gay!

Does it?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
J.D. Hall
United States
Oklahoma
flag msg tools
whac3 wrote:
1. So this isn't from the Onion?

2. From the time of Paul whose letters virtually all condemn things which are now accepted as standard, yesterday's heresy is again and again throughout Christian history today's standard theology. Admittedly not all heresies reached that threshold but many did.

EDIT:
This is healthy and normal. Every religion must evolve or it will become irrelevant to its potential adherents.

There you go again, being all factual and reasonable. Tsk, tsk....
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Junior McSpiffy
United States
Riverton
Utah
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
fightcitymayor wrote:
GameCrossing wrote:
Just because we ain't going to heaven doesn't mean I'm gonna turn gay!

Does it?


I see the clinging and the gnashing of teeth.... I guess the weeping is afterward?
3 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Lynette
United States
Richland
Washington
flag msg tools
Yep, I am a girl Scientist. Come for the breasts; Stay for the brains!
badge
For as long as I shall live I will testify to love; I'll be a witness in the silences when words are not enough.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
dandechino wrote:


Except that they are bullshit JUST like the Onion.

Note the DISCLAIMER at the bottom of the page please...

Quote:
The Babylon Bee is Your Trusted Source For Christian News Satire.


They really should make that MORE PROMINENT.
3 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mac Mcleod
United States
houston
Texas
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Meerkat wrote:
dandechino wrote:


Except that they are bullshit JUST like the Onion.

Note the DISCLAIMER at the bottom of the page please...

Quote:
The Babylon Bee is Your Trusted Source For Christian News Satire.


They really should make that MORE PROMINENT.


Wouldn't it have been inspiring (not just as a christian but as a human being) if Tebow did do that?

And christians DO sometimes behave like that. I've personally experienced it. I still fukin hate that site.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Daniel
United States
Santee
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Meerkat wrote:
dandechino wrote:


Except that they are bullshit JUST like the Onion.

Note the DISCLAIMER at the bottom of the page please...

Quote:
The Babylon Bee is Your Trusted Source For Christian News Satire.


They really should make that MORE PROMINENT.


I'll let the editor know....

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.