Edgar Gallego
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Well, I'll write the AAR when I learn how to put images here without having them in a server!! any idea?

People, preorder this game, this is the best game I ever played, and I can't wait for playing the MMP's edition and touch the map and counters!! Vassal is great, but this game will enhance your table, or wall...


Counters


There are 2 types: Soldiers and Leaders. A Soldier unit represents approximately 1,500 to 2,000 soldiers and is the most basic unit in the game. Leader units are the Generals or Lords that were present in the historical campaign. Leaders are considered as Soldier units but also have some special abilities. Leaders have a Bravery Factor (modifiers in combat) and may have a Betrayal Ability (possibility to make other Soldiers and Leaders join his Clan, by negotiation, or in middle of a battle).

Leaders like Takeda Shingen have a very good combination of betrayal and combat, and other like Uesugi Kenshin have only combat modifiers, being unable to attract samurais and leaders to his side but near invincible in battle. The most are generals with only 1 bravery factor.

Soldiers can move by their own.

Action Chits: The game is driven by Action chits. Players blindly draw a chit from a container to see what power will be active during this action phase. Some Powers have 2 (1 for the Power and other for a daimyo if he’s alive) and the most only 1.

When the End Turn chit is drawn, the game turn is finished. It means some things, like winter, a pause in the campaigns to recruit more troops, generals unsuccessfully assaulting fortress, lack of supply, bad weather, diplomacy between daimyos, etc.

Game Turn:

A game turn begins with the first action chit drawn and ends when the End chit is drawn and his phase is resolved. Here is a resume of what happens in a turn:

The Active Player (one of his power chit is drawn):
1) May play any event cards
2) May exile any of his Active Power Leaders
3) May Negotiate with enemy/neutral units with his eligible Leaders
4) Rolls one die to see how many actions points the power may perform. Add two if the Power controls Kyoto.
5) May perform his allotted movement actions
6) May perform combat/siege with the Active Units

The End Phase
1) The player that controls Kyoto (Capital) draws an event card.
2) Each power deploys its reinforcements, Oda player first. Neutral Powers could enter now if it’s the turn of entry.
3) Disband any Soldier from any Box on the board, Oda player first.
4) Perform death checks for Takeda Shingen and/or Uesugi Kenshin if they are in play, and Oda after the turn 30.
5) Put all the eligible Action chits again in the cup.
6) Advance the turn marker to the next turn.


Moving:

An Action point can be used to move 4 Units by road, or 8 Units by highway. Double the cost if the units are Out of Communications.

Battles:


When Units from both players are in a box there is a battle. Battles consists on a series of rounds that finish when one side lose all his units, or decide to retreat. Each round consists in an initiative check, to see if only one player will hit, or both, and then the hit die rolls. Hits are accomplished by rolling modified 6, each unit rolls 1 die. So if you have 5 units, you roll 5 dice, and if you have a Leader with bravery you add the bravery to the die rolls of 4 units if the leader is general or 8 units if he’s a Lord.

A Leader is also a unit, and count for the limit of 4 or 8 (he gets his modifier).

Battles are really bloody most of the time, and the modifiers are what can make you victorious or see how your big army disappears from the map. So, be careful when going to battle, and decide when to retreat wisely… it’s usual that you decide to stand for another round only to see that the next round your army is half the size it was. Retreat better before than after. And one more thing: retreats are not cheap, if your leader is not good it’s possible that the other guy gets a free round to hit your units.


Sieges:

Fortresses can contain up to the double of his size in units. And his size is a modifier to respond to assaults. The besieged units hits first, and the assaulting units later, without modifiers. Taking a fortress like Ishijama (Osaka) or another one with a good leader inside is a hard task, accomplished only by years… and 1 year is 2 turns.
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Adam Starkweather
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Hopefully, Edgar won't mind this...but he posted more on consimworld that I am porting over here...

Edgar is the primary playtester for MDT...

From Edgar:

I'm going to start an AAR from a game played some weeks ago. I was the Anti-Oda side, and Hugo, the other player, played the Oda Side. I will describe the first turns of the game first, then I'll write about the mechanisms, game sequence, etc, and later I'll continue with the AAR.

Now, the first 3 turns. Tomorrow I'll explain the game sequence.

First of all I must say that this game is really great, fascinating: quick, agile, fun, with players reaching his high marks only to see how a calculated counterattack and some betrayals from his vassals turn the tide on. One of the best games I ever played, if not THE best.

If you enjoy games where rules must not be consulted every 5 minutes, and games complex to master, this is your game. If you also are a Sengoku Jidai aficionado and like historical games, go immediatly and PREORDER this gem.

First, a little background about what is happening, based on Adam’s post (a month ago).

It is early in the year 1570 at the game start. Nobunaga has been in the capital for some time now and is starting to concentrate his power over all of Japan. Traditionally, the clan that held the capital was the one seen as the ruling Daimyo but this was fairly loose. Nobunaga is trying to make it a far more powerful position.

Some time ago, Nobunaga has called a meeting of all the Daimyo to discuss some governmental procedures but really he is testing the waters. Who will come? Many show up but one obvious absentee was Asakura Yoshikage, Daimyo of the Asakura Clan, one of the big Clans and close to Kyoto. Nobunaga wanted him to go to Kyoto, showing then to the rest of Japan that Asakura Clan accepted Oda as leader, but he have slapped Oda in the face and dishonored him by not coming.

Oda decides to attack Asakura for this affront, and also to remove a future threat to the Capital, and has moved to the north. He has laid siege to the great Kanagasaki castle and it has finally fallen. The way to strike into the heartland of Asakura lies open.

However, in a sudden backstab, Asai Nagamasa, his brother-in-law, has openly joined Asakura and is positioned to Oda's rear. In addition, the warrior monk clan Enryaku-Ji is directly in the way of Oda's lines of communications back to the Capital. Oda has enemies all around him and must retreat.

This is when the game begins.



Turn 1 (1570):

Oda Nobunaga, the big Daimyo, betrayed by his brother-in-law must stop the campaign if he doesn’t want to be smashed by the combined armies of Asai and Asakura and the lack of supply.

This first turn Oda moves quickly to Kyoto and then to Sawayama, to punish the Asai, while the Hongan-ji (warrior monks) threaten him by South, sieging his ally Matsunaga Hisahide and his general Takigawa Kazumasu in a large offensive commanded by Saika Magoichi, the leader of the Saika monks, and joined by Miyoshi Clan.

At same time Oda abandoned Kyoto, the treacherous Shogun, Ashikaga Yoshiaki tempted the minor Clans from Tanba-Kameyama to join the Anti-Oda Alliance and send Nobunaga to his province, where he shouldn’t have exited. His troops enter the capital.

Asakura moves his big army to smash the Oda Army at Kanagasaki, now out of supply since Kyoto is now Ashikaga domain. After a quick and bloody battle, only 1 unit of the 12 remains inside the castle.

In other front, Tokugawa Ieyasu, neighbour of Nobunaga and allied to him, starts to expand his clan into Totomi province, sieging some minor forts.



Turn 2(1570):

Oda starts the campaign of the 2nd half of 1570. He sends troops with Hideyoshi to retake Kyoto, but Ashikaga troops retreat to Tanba leaving the city open, Mitsuhide to siege Jotei and Katsuie to capture the abandoned Asai fortress of Yokoyama.

Miyoshi is unsuccessful sieging Kazumasu. Winter comes and the turn ends.



Turn 3 (1st half 1571)

Oda starts again using the highways the army moves to eliminate Miyoshi Brothers and relieve the siege. He’s also successful negotiating with the minor clans at Tanba (the ones that joined Ashikaga) and now are part of Oda domains. The ensuing battle ends with an spectacular Miyoshi defeat, being himself the only surviving unit and retreating to Fukushima. Asakura moves the army to join Asai and present battle to the Oda generals in Yokoyama (Katsuie and Murashige).

Battle at Yokoyama: 3 rounds, all Asakura units lost, most of them by ambush (card), all Oda units die and the generals can’t escape both dead.

Siege of Kanagasaki returns the fortress to Asakura hands.

Enryaku-ji monks take the capital again and End of turn.



That's all so far...hopefully Edgar will pick it up later and tell us what happened...

I think this does give an idea how this games plays.
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Edgar Gallego
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Adam, thanks for posting that here. I'll continue the AAR explaining a game turn better, I hope people can understand how it works and get a feeling of this game.

The first turns are often a show of Oda using generals + highways to extinguish the fires from Asakura-Asai at East, Hongan-ji at South, Miyoshi at West and Ashikaga + Enryaku-ji at Center. He can do this well, but must do it before Takeda starts the invasion.. he's one of the greatest Daimyos, he has really good generals, and a direct menace.
 
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