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Subject: [RANT] My old company rss

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Chris Tannhauser
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Turn the figurehead into the wind, lash the crew to the masts, and God be with us.
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Fun Fact: Known to sniff glitter-glue out of a Muse's thong.
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My favorite line from John Dies at the End:

"Do the bees know they make the honey for you?"
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Society of Watchers
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Killbuck
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So sorry for your experience at that company. I wish I could say I was surprised by what they did, but I'm not. You just cannot be that honest to your employers. I learned that the hard way too and now know to keep things close to the vest and if you like a job, then learn to be indispensable. So indispensable that if they let you go, they'll realize they can't do something vital without you and will have to then pay you considerably more to bring you back on and give you more authority.
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Boaty McBoatface
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This is the sort of thing that makes me never bother to be this upfront.

But it is hard to discus this with out RSPing the topic.
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Bryan Thunkd
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b a n j o wrote:
I informed HR that I would be looking for employment outside of the company, and to expect my resignation before the end of the year. I didn't want to blindside a company I loved, by leaving abruptly. In the interim, as always, I stated that I would perform my current duties to the best of my ability.
This was a mistake.

You should always assume once you inform the company that you plan on leaving that they might let you go at any moment. If they allow you to stay longer it will only be because it is more convenient for them.
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Harmonica
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Keep your lovin' brother happy!
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Anglosaxon corporate culture ... glad I'm not in it!

Good stuff for Dilbert though.
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Matt Riddle
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b a n j o wrote:
Thunkd wrote:
b a n j o wrote:
I informed HR that I would be looking for employment outside of the company, and to expect my resignation before the end of the year. I didn't want to blindside a company I loved, by leaving abruptly. In the interim, as always, I stated that I would perform my current duties to the best of my ability.
This was a mistake.

You should always assume once you inform the company that you plan on leaving that they might let you go at any moment. If they allow you to stay longer it will only be because it is more convenient for them.


Yeah, lesson learned. It was my fault for thinking about my co-workers. As much as it goes against my character, I will refrain from doing so in the future. It doesn't make the company any less reprehensible though.


that website is a whole company?
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Bryan Thunkd
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b a n j o wrote:
Thunkd wrote:
b a n j o wrote:
I informed HR that I would be looking for employment outside of the company, and to expect my resignation before the end of the year. I didn't want to blindside a company I loved, by leaving abruptly. In the interim, as always, I stated that I would perform my current duties to the best of my ability.
This was a mistake.

You should always assume once you inform the company that you plan on leaving that they might let you go at any moment. If they allow you to stay longer it will only be because it is more convenient for them.


Yeah, lesson learned. It was my fault for thinking about my co-workers. As much as it goes against my character, I will refrain from doing so in the future. It doesn't make the company any less reprehensible though.
From their perspective once you've made the decision to leave there's a risk that you've "checked out". Certainly you've lost any motivation to "do great things" as it won't improve your future at the company. And quite frankly, it's human nature that once you know you're leaving, that you start interpreting things differently.

The everyday mundane annoyances become more grating because you know you have nothing to lose and aren't willing to put up with problem situations in the same way that someone who knows they'll be there for the long term would. There's simply a big chance you'll become a bad apple... and potentially you could have a negative attitude that could poison the bunch. They're not crazy or evil for fearing that keeping you around could have negative consequences (regardless of whether it would actually happen or not).

Also... if they passed you over for a number of other positions within the company, that suggests there might be a not-so-good-fit situation with you and them and that they may have been trying to figure out what to do with you. By forcing them to consider what happens when you leave, you may have pushed them into realizing that parting ways was the best solution.

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Mystery McMysteryface
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Florida
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Bottom line:

Employers are not loyal to their employees, so as an employee you owe no loyalty to an employer.

I could write pages of stories like yours of my personal experience and of others.

Very glad you found a different job and quick. Lessons were learned. And I'm 100% sure your old company is now putting the blame on you for their shortcomings. :shrugs:

Companies want Yes-men/women and friendly, cooperative workers. They don't want problems and value a lot over talent, hard-work, and excellence.

As Slater mentioned, it borders on politics, so leave it at that.

Look at it this way: They did you a favor in letting you go now instead of you suffering through until the end of the year.
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fightcitymayor
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Mc Donald
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Working at a company that makes its money via leisure activities always seems like a gamble. Because there are no shortage of talented (and untalented) people willing to work for peanuts and get pushed around because "Hey, I work with games all day!" The jobs I've had with shady companies doing shady things have always proven to have the most job-security. The minute you start doing something you like for someone else, they expect you to work for peanuts and play the shiny, happy corporate soldier.
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Matt Riddle
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b a n j o wrote:
riddlen wrote:
b a n j o wrote:
Thunkd wrote:
b a n j o wrote:
I informed HR that I would be looking for employment outside of the company, and to expect my resignation before the end of the year. I didn't want to blindside a company I loved, by leaving abruptly. In the interim, as always, I stated that I would perform my current duties to the best of my ability.
This was a mistake.

You should always assume once you inform the company that you plan on leaving that they might let you go at any moment. If they allow you to stay longer it will only be because it is more convenient for them.


Yeah, lesson learned. It was my fault for thinking about my co-workers. As much as it goes against my character, I will refrain from doing so in the future. It doesn't make the company any less reprehensible though.


that website is a whole company?


Yes. With more than 100 employees.


wow, that is crazy. I never would have guessed.
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Paul DeStefano
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It's a Zendrum. www.zendrum.com
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Thunkd wrote:
b a n j o wrote:
I informed HR that I would be looking for employment outside of the company, and to expect my resignation before the end of the year. I didn't want to blindside a company I loved, by leaving abruptly. In the interim, as always, I stated that I would perform my current duties to the best of my ability.
This was a mistake.


In my company, and the prior large corporation I had worked at, it was fairly well known that if you gave notice, you were simply ejected that day.

There's too much chance of you wasting their money either being lazy or intentionally sabotaging.
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Scott Russell
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In the auto industry, if you aren't going to a direct competitor, you "get" to work the two weeks of your notice. If it's a competitor, you're walked out that day, but usually get paid the two weeks.

While the company may not be loyal, a good relationship with your boss can help. When I made my last change, I told my boss that I had something to tell him and asked if he wanted to hear it now or in two weeks. He chose the two week option.
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Walking on eggshells is not my style
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North Pole
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No.

Gotta disagree with the masses.

You did the right thing by informing them. That is just what a nice person would do. If you find yourself in a similar circumstance, you should do it again.

Lousy people prey upon nice people. Lousy people will hurt you for no reason.

Get on with life. And ask yourself if you were an employer would you want the employee to be up front with you.
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Nicklas Roman
Sweden
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Geosphere wrote:
Thunkd wrote:
b a n j o wrote:
I informed HR that I would be looking for employment outside of the company, and to expect my resignation before the end of the year. I didn't want to blindside a company I loved, by leaving abruptly. In the interim, as always, I stated that I would perform my current duties to the best of my ability.
This was a mistake.


In my company, and the prior large corporation I had worked at, it was fairly well known that if you gave notice, you were simply ejected that day.

There's too much chance of you wasting their money either being lazy or intentionally sabotaging.


This part feels so wrong to me, as a swede. If you are not a new employee the law in Sweden actually prohibits employers from doing things like this.

Good that you found a new job!
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Bryan Thunkd
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Koldfoot wrote:
No.

Gotta disagree with the masses.

You did the right thing by informing them. That is just what a nice person would do. If you find yourself in a similar circumstance, you should do it again.

Lousy people prey upon nice people. Lousy people will hurt you for no reason.
The idea that a company is lousy or reprehensible for letting someone go after they've given notice is ridiculous. They're simply minimizing the risk of an employee causing problems. It's standard procedure in many IT jobs for an employee to immediately shown the door after giving notice. You know why? Because there have been a number of instances where an employee in their last two weeks sabotaged the system. There's a lot of risk leaving someone with that much potential for damage in their position after they've decided they're done. Anyone who deals with clients probably has the potential to do almost as much damage. Even employees who don't deliberately sabotage the company will often bring a toxic attitude to the workplace once they have given notice.

And hey, maybe you, or even most employees, wouldn't be a problem. But the company doesn't really have a good way of predicting who will be the problem case and who won't. Predicting human behavior is hard.

When you talk about being a nice person, you're bringing personal relationship ideas into a business situation. Your boss might indeed want to be nice to you... but he has an obligation to do what's best for the company. And honestly, the reason you two know each other is because you are in a business relationship with each other. That is defined by roles, rules and such. When you start bringing "nice" into it, you're trying to make it something more, like a friendship. And while it may be something more, as you may have become friends with people at work, it might also not be. I'm not friends with people at my workplace. I wouldn't expect them to treat me in any way other than professional courtesy and respect.

The standards and expectations that apply to personal relationships outside of work are different than those that apply at work. If you don't make that distinction then you'll make these kinds of mistakes a lot.
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Mystery McMysteryface
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Florida
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Thunkd wrote:
Koldfoot wrote:
No.

Gotta disagree with the masses.

You did the right thing by informing them. That is just what a nice person would do. If you find yourself in a similar circumstance, you should do it again.

Lousy people prey upon nice people. Lousy people will hurt you for no reason.
The idea that a company is lousy or reprehensible for letting someone go after they've given notice is ridiculous. They're simply minimizing the risk of an employee causing problems. It's standard procedure in many IT jobs for an employee to immediately shown the door after giving notice. You know why? Because there have been a number of instances where an employee in their last two weeks sabotaged the system. There's a lot of risk leaving someone with that much potential for damage in their position after they've decided they're done. Anyone who deals with clients probably has the potential to do almost as much damage. Even employees who don't deliberately sabotage the company will often bring a toxic attitude to the workplace once they have given notice.

And hey, maybe you, or even most employees, wouldn't be a problem. But the company doesn't really have a good way of predicting who will be the problem case and who won't. Predicting human behavior is hard.

When you talk about being a nice person, you're bringing personal relationship ideas into a business situation. Your boss might indeed want to be nice to you... but he has an obligation to do what's best for the company. And honestly, the reason you two know each other is because you are in a business relationship with each other. That is defined by roles, rules and such. When you start bringing "nice" into it, you're trying to make it something more, like a friendship. And while it may be something more, as you may have become friends with people at work, it might also not be. I'm not friends with people at my workplace. I wouldn't expect them to treat me in any way other than professional courtesy and respect.

The standards and expectations that apply to personal relationships outside of work are different than those that apply at work. If you don't make that distinction then you'll make these kinds of mistakes a lot.


Sometimes it is simply policy. Many moons ago I worked in a Human Resources department with access to employee databases that included personal information and salary information. I gave a 2-week notice and the next day was let go and escorted from the building (with pay up to the 2 weeks of my notice) because of their security policy.
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Stephen Harkleroad
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Kittanning
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As someone who works in Resource Management (not HR--I do scheduling/productivity):

Never, ever, ever tell an employer you're going to leave unless you're ready to be unemployed that day.

Quite frankly, the evidence that people who are going to leave are going to be less productive to be point of being effectively zero is overwhelming. Once you've indicated that you are out, as far as a company is concerned you're not producing anymore.

Is this the same for everyone? Obviously not. But the evidence is absolutely, unmistakably clear that someone who is "done" with a company is no longer worth employing based on a productivity to labor cost perspective.

That's one of the reasons why the two weeks standard is fairly common on both sides--that's a short enough time frame that most employees aren't going to jerk around, and also a relatively minimal cost to the company even if you are worthless.

Everyone always claims that they are totally productive as long as they are getting paid, but this is demonstrably false.

So I can't fault a company for acting this way. I don't find them reprehensible; I think it's absolutely a sensible and logical step.
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