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Shadows of Brimstone: City of the Ancients» Forums » General

Subject: Assembly rss

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Steve Moores
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This is more than a game, it is a life stealer. Having had my eye on Brimstone for a while I decided to buy the 2 core boxes, and 3 expansions.
I have spent the last 2 weeks assembling the miniatures.(The big ones are easy). My sight has gone blurred from eye strain and superglue poisoning.Not to mention the superglue withdrawal symptoms every morning. My patience has been tested to the limit with plastic arms and other appendages falling off.I can now see the light at the end of the tunnel and can't wait to dive into this sophisticated and gorgeous game.
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Max Jansson
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I went with superglue as well. Big mistake! Should have gotten plastic glue instead, but I was impatient. Now I glue back everything that falls off with plastic glue for a much stronger bond (yes I sand down first).
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Ian Finn
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Rotherman wrote:
This is more than a game, it is a life stealer.


SoB is a Lifestyle Game, much like Chess, Advanced Squad Leader, or D&D. Like those games, you could play SoB and nothing else for the rest of your life. Whereas some people devote their lives to the violin, or to their careers, or to contemplating the Big Questions, such as where butterflies go when it rains, or whether the universe is indifferent to our notions of good and evil, lifestyle SoB'ers don virtual-VR goggles (i.e., no goggles at all) and cross an experiential barrier to emerge into an alternate and inexhaustible world of characters, plots, and devils. And SoB is always there with you, even when you aren't playing it, background thought cycles in your mind. Quite a feat for a consumer product made of paper, plastic, and ideas.
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Sid Rain
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Plastic Glue will work great for the Core sets, but some of the newer Heroes were made using Resin, which I would suggest using Loctite Super Glue with (after giving the figure a good washing with soap).
 
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Rob Wrigley
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Model glue/solvent isn't glue. It dissolves the plastic a bit, and melts the pieces together. Done right, it's all but unbreakable. Also, pick up some needle files, razor blades, and some model putty and/or green stuff. Them models need a lot of love and gap filling to finish.
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Jee Fu
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Avoid Superglue whenever possible. It's an wholly evil substance, brought about by Dark Alchemy and hewn from the liquefied bones of the stillborn. Can plastic glue solve the problem instead? What about Elmer's? Duck Tape? Scotch Tape? String? Chewing Gum? Avoid Superglue whenever possible.

- Jee
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Rob Wrigley
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Further info re: superglue is evil.

Try a two part epoxy for metal and resin. You can find cheap, effective,plastic-safe ones at most hardware stores. It's a bit fiddly, but holds better than anything. It can be hard to use on the smallest piece, but with some practice you'll never want to touch superglue ever again.
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Robert Haddon
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I've logged hundreds of hours of assembling and painting SoB, but only dozens of hours playing it. Hopefully I will be able to fix that.

I only used superglue. #impatient

When the models break, I'll cry a bit, then patch them up.

Side note: due to the melting nature of plastic cement, I don't think it's recommended for quality minis, but it's probably perfect for SoB--maybe you can melt away some of those gaps. Anybody tried it on the newer high-detail resins?
 
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Eric Harman
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Bah! They just fear the dark Lord cyanoacrylate.
Super glue is fine. :-)
 
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Max Jansson
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Friedmutant wrote:

I've logged hundreds of hours of assembling and painting SoB, but only dozens of hours playing it. Hopefully I will be able to fix that.

I only used superglue. #impatient

When the models break, I'll cry a bit, then patch them up.

Side note: due to the melting nature of plastic cement, I don't think it's recommended for quality minis, but it's probably perfect for SoB--maybe you can melt away some of those gaps. Anybody tried it on the newer high-detail resins?


I don't think resin is compatible with plastic glue.
 
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Rob Wrigley
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Evil_X wrote:
Friedmutant wrote:

I've logged hundreds of hours of assembling and painting SoB, but only dozens of hours playing it. Hopefully I will be able to fix that.

I only used superglue. #impatient

When the models break, I'll cry a bit, then patch them up.

Side note: due to the melting nature of plastic cement, I don't think it's recommended for quality minis, but it's probably perfect for SoB--maybe you can melt away some of those gaps. Anybody tried it on the newer high-detail resins?


I don't think resin is compatible with plastic glue.


It varies, because 'resin' can mean any number of things; bur generally it doesn't melt from plastic solvent.
As for 'quality models', if they are made from modeling plastic, then plastic solvent is the product made for it. The material and the solvent are chemically designed to work together. That's why the solvent doesn't usually work on 'resin'. If you are distorting the model then you are doing something very wrong. For the same reason, 'melting gaps' isn't in an option either. That's not what the solvent was made to do, and you'll just be gobbing it on and making a pile of sh*t. The way to deal with gaps is modeling putty and/or kneadatite.

Virtually any model kit you buy, regardless of price, quality, or material, requires some degree of filing, gaping, and clean-up before and after assembly. Its part of the art and process.
 
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Freelance Police
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robwrigley wrote:
Try a two part epoxy for metal and resin.


Definitely this. I used Milliput to assemble the multipiece miniatures and remove gaps. Search on "miniature painting milliput" and "milliput gap filling". Roll a thin amount of epoxy between two "halves" of a multipiece miniature and press together.

Superglue worked (mostly on single-piece miniatures), except I sometimes pinned the miniature, drilling through the base as well. On the underside of the base, I further secured the pin with school glue. Search on "miniature painting pinning". I recommend the Army Painter hand drill, which is under $10 on Amazon and Miniature Market.

One weird trick is to fill in a small cavity with Milliput (eg. the feet of the Nightmare) and stick a pin in it, then drill through the bottom of the foot. This lets you pin the ankle to the foot and the foot to the base.

You can also use a layer of cork to make basing the larger figures to the base, in case both feet aren't flush to the plastic base.

Don't be afraid of scraping and cutting the plastic. Multipiece miniatures, particularly two "half" pieces that join together, don't always join seamlessly, anyway. I cut off those tabs that fix an appendage to the main body. They're going to be attached to the body with Milliput, anyway, and trying to fit and fill in gaps for two pieces is enough work.
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Rob Wrigley
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Sam and Max wrote:

Don't be afraid of scraping and cutting the plastic. Multipiece miniatures, particularly two "half" pieces that join together, don't always join seamlessly, anyway. I cut off those tabs that fix an appendage to the main body. They're going to be attached to the body with Milliput, anyway, and trying to fit and fill in gaps for two pieces is enough work.


I don't cut the posts off completely, but I usually lightly file it. That makes them fit a bit better, with less of a gap.
 
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Daniel Davis - Personal
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This is the BEST glue for plastic models. The applicator works flawlessly, it's not messy, and is super easy to add tiny amounts to small points.

https://www.amazon.com/Faller-170492-Expert-Plastic-Cement/d...

I introduced this glue to my friend who has been modeling for decades, and he said it changed his life.

Can't recommend enough.
 
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Daniel Davis - Personal
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Friedmutant wrote:

Side note: due to the melting nature of plastic cement, I don't think it's recommended for quality minis, but it's probably perfect for SoB--maybe you can melt away some of those gaps. Anybody tried it on the newer high-detail resins?


I used the plastic-melting glue I mentioned above for Kingdom Death Monster, which has the highest quality minis ever made, and it worked perfectly. It's all about having an applicator that allows precise control over how much glue is distributed.
 
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