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Subject: How do i prevent the glow? rss

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Terry Kirk
United Kingdom
Barnsley
South Yorkshire
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I'm new to photography,and even newer to photographing cards.
I'm finding it difficult to take photographs of my card game without a reflection of the light.

Can anyone give me tips of how to get some nice photos?
 
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Pasi Ojala
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1.No flash, use a tripod
2.Ambient, indirect lighting.
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Terry Kirk
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a1bert wrote:
1.No flash, use a tripod
2.Ambient, indirect lighting.


I'm not using a flash, the lights in my kitchen are the issue.
I can't quite get the angles i want due to there being so many.

Thinking about it i could wait for a sunny day and take the photos then, but it would be good to be able to get photos in the evening.
 
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Pasi Ojala
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If you already know your issue, you need to work on it.

Maybe you could try white sheets (linen or cardboard) if you don't have real diffusers.

If the ceiling is white, light reflecting off it can help to produce indirect light.
 
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No Cat - No Cradle
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Actually a cloudy day would be better.

As for your kitchen if you have a thin white sheet you could try suspending it between your lights and what it is you are trying to photograph.

What you want to do is scatter the light as much as possible so that it is not all reflecting back into your camera at the same angle, which is what causes the glare.
 
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John McD
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As the others have said, pursuing that really bright direct light whether in the kitchen or on a sunny day isn't really what you want. You want to find gentler, less directional light.
 
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Chris Robbins
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Assuming a digital camera (or even just a phone), try anything and everything. Practice. Delete what you don't like. You are gloriously free from the expense and limitations of film and paper processing.

Explore the world of graphic manipulation (GIMP for free or whatever other style or price you like.)

If you insist that you can't do it, you won't. If you do it, it's done.
 
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Guido Gloor
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Ostermundigen
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Personally, I like indirect light for cards, pointed at the ceiling behind me. That'll give an even undirectional light, and no glare, because of how reflections work (C=camera, L=light):

C L
\ /
\/


Light that is able to reflect in your cards will result in glare. Always.

L
\
C \
\ \


Light that comes from behind you, or from the sides, will not result in glare, because it doesn't reflect off the cards.

It's simple as that. Just think of your cards as a mirror. If you put a mirror there and see light, the picture will be bad.

If you don't have a flash that you can swivel around and point at the ceiling for indirect light, don't use one. If you do, the light comes from the right direction (unless you try to shoot cards straight ahead, see below), but it falls off way too quickly because the power of a light decreases with the distance squared. So light that travels to the ceiling and back will result in a much more evenly lit area than on-camera flash for short distances. But it will also require more flash power and aforementioned swivel flash.

Concerning straight-ahead shots, make sure that you always angle the light in a way that doesn't result in this:

CL
||
||
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If at all possible, use a tripod. This keeps the camera steady and lets you use long exposures.
Mask the lights. Two ways to do this- either use cardboard sheets to prevent the lights shining directly on the cards, or use plain white cloth to build a tent (this option is much better but time consuming). Whichever way you do it, there will be no reflections (good) but it will be fairly dark (bad, maybe?). This lack of light is why you need longer exposure tomes.

Also... a polarising filter might help if you are using an interchangeable lens camera (DSLR, M4/3 etc). Polar filters are expensive though and the light tent is a better way to go.
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Josef Sannholm
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The way I got this at least somewhat improved is not using any light coming directly from above but instead going up towards my white roof so it's indirect. Hope that can help out
 
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Greg Darcy
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I'll second the polarizer if you can't use indirect lighting somehow.
Put one polarizer on the light. And another one in front of the camera lens. By Angling one to the other, you can completely eliminate shine. You can get large sheets of polarizing material at some camera stores. The ones that cater to professionals.

But by far the best is to take the cards outside on an overcast day. Pick one with no wind. whistle

Second best is next to a window that does NOT have direct sunlight coming through. As you are in England, a north facing window would be good.
 
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