Recommend
3 
 Thumb up
 Hide
9 Posts

Betrayal at House on the Hill: Widow's Walk» Forums » Rules

Subject: *Spoilers* Haunt 52 Issues *Spoilers* rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Eric Tuttle
msg tools
Just got done playing haunt 52 ("Prism") for the first time, and I'm having a hard time seeing how the heroes can win this one without a whole bunch of luck.

Quick summary of my understanding of the traitor setup:

1 - Roll to determine which mathematical sequence of numbered obstacles will be safe.

2 - Scatter the obstacle tokens throughout the house in any order.

3 - Choose one of the numbers in the safe sequence to be the "exit room" which the heroes must find.

Based on the fact that the heroes are not told if they find the exit room, and the fact that the hero rules give no indication as to what sort of puzzle might be afoot, here's the only way the heroes can win:

1 - Explore the house to find safe rooms.

2 - Independently realize that the number on the obstacle token in each safe room is significant. Write them down.

3 - Find enough safe rooms (and thus enough numbers) to realize that the numbers form a pattern (e.g. 3, 6, 9, etc.).

4 - Assume that the exit room must be one of the rooms that fits that pattern.

5 - Have each hero move to one of the rooms in the sequence.

6 - Wait for the experiment to end. Hope you got lucky and one of the heroes is in the exit room. This is sketchy at best, because the number sequences contain anywhere from 5 to 9 numbers, versus somewhere between 2 and 5 heroes (assuming they all survived...)

The heroes lost our play through because we assumed that the safe rooms would all form a connected "route" as implied by the Survivor's Guide ("The architects of this murder machine must have created a safe route for themselves...")

We did not for one second consider the possibility that the numbers on the safe room obstacle tokens mattered in any way. Does that mean we're just too dumb for this haunt?

Can someone educate us as to what else we might be missing?

Thanks
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Matt K
msg tools
Yeah, my group just played through this one and had the same exact issue. There is so little guidance for the heroes that it comes down to blind luck, even assuming they figure out the sequence and the safe rooms. I'm wondering if there is supposed to be some hints given by the fact that the exit room can't be moved, while the other rooms in the sequence do move, but even for the traitor, the guidance on how to move the rooms (and what happens to the rest of the house when you do so) was pretty unclear.

I really liked the concept, of having a puzzle sequence for them to figure out - but the final step of 'guess which number the traitor chose' kinda undercut everything else going on.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dorothy S
Canada
flag msg tools
Same issue here. I would recommend that survivors need to make a knowledge roll to figure out which room is the exit. Or have some sort indicator that lets them know which room the exit.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
IcyDuff
msg tools
mbmbmbmb
We played this one this weekend. I was the one who noticed that the safe rooms all had an obstacle # that was a multiple of 4. So we went on a search for those rooms. We thought that you needed to find all of them in order to find a pathway out, not just that you had to guess which one was correct. I agree that the survivor instructions give you the impression that you are looking for and creating a pathway to the exit, not just to find the correct room. We found the correct room but didn't know you had to remain in it, so no one was in the room when they started to shift and we just kept wandering until we lost.

Also, our house was HUGE because the haunt showed up really late in the game, if it was smaller we might have had an easier time with it.

This was the only expansion haunt we've done so far, hopefully the others are a little more clear in the goal.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
John Carey
United States
Overland Park
Kansas
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Just finished this 5 minutes ago. There really needs to be some additional clue to help the heroes find out what is going on. Unless this experiment was based upon testing the dumb luck of people unlucky enough to be in a haunted house I have no clue what this experiment was trying to find out. I know the story shouldn't be taken literally, but having some way to actually solve the problem in some form would be nice. I understand the game is all about randomness, but.... this was randomness given physical form lol
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Tagliaferri
Switzerland
Zeiningen
Aargau
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Did this last night. We were expecting one of the obstacles to be an exit. We went to the exit room but kept exploring not knowing. I was recording the names of the rooms that were safe and not the numbers that were safe.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Roger Edwards
United Kingdom
Bournemouth
Dorset
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I was the traitor for this haunt. On my first turn I immediately hit the question: should I move the landing rooms with players in them? Doing so would have made it far too easy for me to keep the players from getting to the escape room or finding tokens in the sequence. The players would be forced to explore to get to inaccessible parts of the house, but then I could easily break the house again.

I settled on not moving them, but saying, 'can't move that', 'can move this', as I felt a little extra clue was needed. This is because an essential clue is not moving the escape room when a player is in it. Unfortunately, a player's first move was into the escape room, nothing happened, so they moved out before ending their turn. Thus it didn't not move with a player in it (if you get my logic), so the critical clue didn't occur.

Something I missed, which would help the players, is that safe room tokens are flipped face down after discovery and left in the room. Trap room tokens are removed. This would make the rooms more obvious. Thankfully, they had written down the rooms and numbers where nothing happened so they had the information needed, and the tokens were replaced when I realised the error. Once they got a sequence they then got to thinking that they should go through the rooms in order. I'm not sure that was the intent of the sequence, but it's very misleading.

It occurs to me that knowing the numbers is actually irrelevant if the safe room tokens are left behind, so long as the players note which rooms were safe.

The players need to:
- Eliminate trap rooms.
- Find the safe rooms.
- Realise that only one of the safe rooms does not get moved when a player is in it.
- Get into that room for the end of the game.

Playing with 4 explorers, all of the tokens were flipped, but without the non-moving room clue they did not know what to do with the info they had. They also were bemused that they had explored all rooms and nothing obvious to give them a clue had happened. Still, by luck a player ended the last turn only 1 room away from the escape room.

As the traitor I could really have done with clarity over what rooms could be moved and how they could be moved. I now think ALL rooms bar the escape room should be moved, even the hall, to make the non-moving escape room more obvious. The traitor should be judicious so as not to destroy the players' chances completely.

What bugs me is that surely someone in play-testing must have said, 'Can I really move the landings and break the house completely?' Equally, it's hard to believe that the escape room not moving clue was never missed. Conclusion: poor or non-existent play-testing.

But for all that, fun was had, if some frustration also, and it wouldn't be Betrayal if the haunt wasn't a little bit broken, would it?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Pete Martyn
United States
Guilford
VT
flag msg tools
EXCELSIOR!!!
badge
ZOMGALOMES!!!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
We hit this one last night -- first time we'd used the expansion. Gotta say, it didn't leave me feeling inspired to play again.

Despite the instruction that we might want to write things down, we didn't come close to noticing any particular pattern or sequence. After several turns we'd located all of the non-trapped rooms, but nothing had happened. As we'd been in each of those rooms already, we concluded that none of them were the exit room and we began just wandering around the house looking for some other trigger. Eventually the traitor player said, "Guys, I think you might have won a couple turns ago," and a long and frustrating debate ensued which landed us here!

Having now read both the Secrets of Survival and the Traitor's Tome for this Haunt, I must say I agree with those who see a hero win as a virtual impossibility. To correctly deduce that there is a sequence to the safe rooms isn't completely out of the question -- to deduce that one of those rooms is the exit, and that at least one hero needs to be standing in it when the time runs out? This reminds me of some of the more nonsensical puzzles from an old point-and-click adventure game: "Oh, I was supposed to fashion a sling from a mug and a belt and then throw the fish through the window? It's so obvious in retrospect!"

When the traitor (who has played this game many times) isn't even sure how the scenario ends, the scenario has a problem. I'm stunned this one made it through playtesting as written. We had fun too, but in an "Other than that, Mrs. Lincoln, how was the play?" kind of way. The anti-ending we managed completely overshadowed the rest of the experience for me.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael Rasnic
United States
Chicago
Illinois
flag msg tools
mbmbmb
Similar reactions here after our first playthrough. I gotta say, we've played 3 of the expansion haunts, and they've all been awful. Seems like a lot of laziness and a lack of play-testing.

I played on the Heroes for this one. When I read the tome, I was extremely excited. The concept was great. A puzzle to figure out! Awesome. The traitor took forever to set the map up, and I got more excited the longer it took. Finally the game started, and so did the problems.....

We noticed very early that some of the tiles came off the board and some stayed on. Great, first few clues to "figure out the path through the house." Then players started moving, and the rules got vague.

Theoretically, the traitor can move any room a player is in aside from a landing. The traitor would be able to make an objective completely unobtainable. The traitor could also strand parts of the house by removing the only connection between two rooms. The rules didn't say otherwise. We didn't, because it ruined the game.

Then it got worse. On turn 3, we figured out our "code" was prime numbers. By turn 4, we had safely collected each of the prime tokens. Now what? What did these clues tell us? Absolutely nothing.

The payoff was a flop. The end of the game depended on us luckily being in one of the 6 rooms having a safe token. Those are not clues! That's random chance. There were 4 potential sets of numbers. Each of those sets should have lead to a DIFFERENT safe room. You should have had to collect the clues, decipher what they're telling you, and finally make it to the correct room. Instead, it'a a half-assed "Traitor picked a room that has nothing to do with the haunt. GLHF."

Also, the traitor's role was trash. They had nothing to do. He became a glorified dungeon master who sat around for 20 minutes before being able to move 5 rooms around. Sad!

All in all, not impressed with the expansions. Great ideas all around, but pitiful execution.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.