Recommend
 
 Thumb up
 Hide
11 Posts

Terraforming Mars» Forums » General

Subject: Retail price enquiry rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Guillaume Pages
United Kingdom
Oxford
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Last week, I walked into Thirsty Meeples in Oxford UK, and found that they had a copy of Terraforming Mars to purchase, as well as a copy to play in their cafe. I promptly called a friend and we played a quick game in the cafe. Loved it!

Then, I grabbed the retail copy, ready to purchase it, then saw the price tag: 52 british pounds... Looked at a few more games while I was in the shop: Descent at 55, Eldritch Horror at 45, Terra Mystica also at 52, Istanbul at 31, and CO2 at 37(which is very similar game)...

Having just played the game, and having played all these other games at some point, I felt a slight concern that 52 pounds was higher than usual for what I was getting in the box. I also noticed, thanks to Brexit, that boardgame prices in the UK have increased across the board by a couple of pounds.

My ultimate question is: Are there any specific reasons why Terraforming Mars is at the higher end of boardgame prices? Is it due to the cubes?, is it because it is Made in Germany and Assembled in the USA?...Or have we lived in a dreamland where boardgame prices were artificially low, and we are now paying the real price for them?

I did love the game, and may well just decide to buy it and forgo a few other purchases until christmas at least.


3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Stephen Lovell
United States
Edgewood
Washington
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
guigtexas wrote:
Last week, I walked into Thirsty Meeples in Oxford UK, and found that they had a copy of Terraforming Mars to purchase, as well as a copy to play in their cafe. I promptly called a friend and we played a quick game in the cafe. Loved it!

Then, I grabbed the retail copy, ready to purchase it, then saw the price tag: 52 british pounds... Looked at a few more games while I was in the shop: Descent at 55, Eldritch Horror at 45, Terra Mystica also at 52, Istanbul at 31, and CO2 at 37(which is very similar game)...

Having just played the game, and having played all these other games at some point, I felt a slight concern that 52 pounds was higher than usual for what I was getting in the box. I also noticed, thanks to Brexit, that boardgame prices in the UK have increased across the board by a couple of pounds.

My ultimate question is: Are there any specific reasons why Terraforming Mars is at the higher end of boardgame prices? Is it due to the cubes?, is it because it is Made in Germany and Assembled in the USA?...Or have we lived in a dreamland where boardgame prices were artificially low, and we are now paying the real price for them?

I did love the game, and may well just decide to buy it and forgo a few other purchases until christmas at least.




I'm too tired to answer your whole post, but let me assure you that TM and CO2 are really nothing alike at all.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Nick P.
Germany
Munich
Bavaria
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
In Germany it does cost 60 €, which is about 54 british pounds.

I think these prices are a bit higher than average because it is made by a small company which can't produce at the same cost as a big one like FFG (since you mentioned Descent and Eldritch Horror).

Considering the work and the risk involved, most boardgames are pretty cheap, so I have no problem with that.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Vincent Murphy
United States
Massachusetts
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
If I recall, the game is also completely produced in the US, not China, so the price is higher due to that.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
H-B-G
United Kingdom
Halesowen
West Midlands
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
vjmurphy wrote:
If I recall, the game is also completely produced in the US, not China, so the price is higher due to that.


According to the box, the game is made in Germany, assembled in the USA.

Regarding the games mentioned in the OP, I wonder how long the prices for the other games have stood (I haven't been tracking them). Terraforming Mars is a new game that has appeared since the drop in the pound, perhaps the prices of the others have yet to rise as suppliers have to restock.

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Maciej Matejko
Poland
Łuków
Lubelskie
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
guigtexas wrote:
My ultimate question is: Are there any specific reasons why Terraforming Mars is at the higher end of boardgame prices? Is it due to the cubes?, is it because it is Made in Germany and Assembled in the USA?...


Our polish version costs about 27 €, so high price in the UK have nothing to do with quality of game components I think.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dan Reimschiissel
United States
Sterling
Illinois
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
The retail cost in the US is $70. I was surprised by the price tag. I would have expected it to be $10-20 less.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Joe Zarate-Sanderlin
United States
San Francisco
California
flag msg tools
badge
A man, a plan, a canal, Panama!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I got mine for what seemed like a too good to be true price of 59.95 USD with free shipping from Colorado to California via eBay.

I had tried to buy a different company for 66.68 USD previously though the seller claimed that the item was damaged then listed it at a price of 93.17 USD. Right now, there are eBay listings from MSRP for the US edition to E169 (!) for the German edition. I suspect that it has to do with scarcity.

Perhaps they will reprint and print extra, more sturdy inserts . . .
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Richard Urich
United States
Stuart
Florida
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
The higher price is not because of the cubes or being manufactured in Germany (just compare to other games made in Germany). It is 100% about trying to maximize profits.

There are a lot of experiments by board game companies that are testing how much pricing power they have, from exclusive distribution deals to eliminating middle men to variable prices dependent on distribution channel to higher margin components (aka higher quality) to just plain higher MSRPs. Prices will continue to increase until the point at which sales decline more than the margin increases. It is just business and maximizing profits.

If you want to know why this is suddenly so common, and spreading so quickly, it is because our little hobby has grown up. The manufacturing process basically dictates what size a print run will be, and that hasn't changed. Five years ago, prices had to be low so the games didn't sit in a warehouse incurring storage fees forever. Today, there is a lot more demand and a lot more retail stores holding inventory instead of a warehouse. All of this makes it far easier, quicker, and cheaper to sell through a print run. While a company could increase the size of the print run, the savings are minimal once you've reached the sweet spot, and you'd probably lose money storing the extra inventory and taking loans to finance the production. And the smaller print runs have the benefit of increasing demand for future shipments. So companies are trying to figure out the most money they can make from this setup. The ideal price for maximizing profit is probably going to be somewhere around the highest price that allows a full print run to sell in about four months. This allows time to assess demand, raise capital from sales, and order the next print run to show up a month or two after the last wave sold out.

But the other part of an expanding market is there should be a lot of new entrants, and some will compete on price. I think it is probably fair to say there are more good games at $30 price points today than there were five years ago, even though a far greater portion of the market is now comprised of $60+ games.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
arry -
msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmb
RichardU wrote:
The higher price is not because of the cubes or being manufactured in Germany (just compare to other games made in Germany). It is 100% about trying to maximize profits.

There are a lot of experiments by board game companies that are testing how much pricing power they have, from exclusive distribution deals to eliminating middle men to variable prices dependent on distribution channel to higher margin components (aka higher quality) to just plain higher MSRPs. Prices will continue to increase until the point at which sales decline more than the margin increases. It is just business and maximizing profits.

If you want to know why this is suddenly so common, and spreading so quickly, it is because our little hobby has grown up. The manufacturing process basically dictates what size a print run will be, and that hasn't changed. Five years ago, prices had to be low so the games didn't sit in a warehouse incurring storage fees forever. Today, there is a lot more demand and a lot more retail stores holding inventory instead of a warehouse. All of this makes it far easier, quicker, and cheaper to sell through a print run. While a company could increase the size of the print run, the savings are minimal once you've reached the sweet spot, and you'd probably lose money storing the extra inventory and taking loans to finance the production. And the smaller print runs have the benefit of increasing demand for future shipments. So companies are trying to figure out the most money they can make from this setup. The ideal price for maximizing profit is probably going to be somewhere around the highest price that allows a full print run to sell in about four months. This allows time to assess demand, raise capital from sales, and order the next print run to show up a month or two after the last wave sold out.

But the other part of an expanding market is there should be a lot of new entrants, and some will compete on price. I think it is probably fair to say there are more good games at $30 price points today than there were five years ago, even though a far greater portion of the market is now comprised of $60+ games.

There should be a board game about that.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Guillaume Pages
United Kingdom
Oxford
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
RichardU wrote:
The higher price is not because of the cubes or being manufactured in Germany (just compare to other games made in Germany). It is 100% about trying to maximize profits.

There are a lot of experiments by board game companies that are testing how much pricing power they have, from exclusive distribution deals to eliminating middle men to variable prices dependent on distribution channel to higher margin components (aka higher quality) to just plain higher MSRPs. Prices will continue to increase until the point at which sales decline more than the margin increases. It is just business and maximizing profits.

If you want to know why this is suddenly so common, and spreading so quickly, it is because our little hobby has grown up. The manufacturing process basically dictates what size a print run will be, and that hasn't changed. Five years ago, prices had to be low so the games didn't sit in a warehouse incurring storage fees forever. Today, there is a lot more demand and a lot more retail stores holding inventory instead of a warehouse. All of this makes it far easier, quicker, and cheaper to sell through a print run. While a company could increase the size of the print run, the savings are minimal once you've reached the sweet spot, and you'd probably lose money storing the extra inventory and taking loans to finance the production. And the smaller print runs have the benefit of increasing demand for future shipments. So companies are trying to figure out the most money they can make from this setup. The ideal price for maximizing profit is probably going to be somewhere around the highest price that allows a full print run to sell in about four months. This allows time to assess demand, raise capital from sales, and order the next print run to show up a month or two after the last wave sold out.

But the other part of an expanding market is there should be a lot of new entrants, and some will compete on price. I think it is probably fair to say there are more good games at $30 price points today than there were five years ago, even though a far greater portion of the market is now comprised of $60+ games.


Makes complete sense to me! I can also see that not manufacturing in China is more expensive, but equally, it reminds of Victory Point, who had been producing their games mostly in-house in California, and who a few months ago, made the decision to move out of California and move the printing to China, to increase revenue.

Still, we shouldn't complain, there are so many more games now that there were 10 years ago. The breadth is breathtaking.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.