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Subject: August 29 - Full day scenario rss

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John Curley
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This is a revised version of Road to Washington’s Scenario 8, “August 29.” It is played on my new map, not the map accompanying the game. The opening has historical deployments, and the morning period roughly follows historical orders and activities. The afternoon period is different. An ‘orders’ sub-system is used, as well as a number of house rules.

Morning Phase
6:00 am - Morning opens with the forces far apart. Mj. Gen Sigel (1v Corps commander) is the senior Union Commander of the field.

Jackson’s forces are nowhere in the sight of the Union, but are presumed to be in the hills and woods towards Sudley.

Pope’s order to Sigel, received around midnight, is to "attack the enemy vigorously the next morning."

Sigel’s two divisions are on Henry Hill and Bald Hill, with Milroy’s independent brigade on Chinn ridge overlooking the Warrenton Turnpike.

Reynolds’ division, which arrived on the field the prior evening as the Brawner’s Farm battle was progressing, is arrayed in fields near Wheeler’s Farm.

Jackson’s forces are, left to right: AP Hill’s Light division, Ewell’s division (commanded by Brig. General Lawton) and then Jackson’s division (commanded by Brig. General Starke) – along the line mostly defined by the unfinished railroad. Early heads up two brigades, his own and Hays’ brigade (commanded by Col. Forno) along Pageland Lane, with a single battery (Johnson). Robinson’s cavalry brigade rests near the crossing of Pageland lane and the railroad, to Early’s left.

9:00 am - Sigel, not knowing precisely the location of Jackson’s forces, spreads his commands out in exploratory attacks.

Schurz’s division proceeds on the Union right near Sudley. Milroy’s brigade is in the middle in Groveton Woods. Schenk’s division is on the left in the woods near the Cundiff house; his skirmishers facing off with confederate skirmishers deployed by Early.

Reynolds deploys around the W. Lewis House on Schenk’s left.

Col. Krzyzanowski finds the Confederate line first. It is along the unfinished railroad, Gregg’s brigade, and Col. Krzyz begins the morning attack – but without success.

A brief foray by Milroy in the Groveton Woods against Lawton’s troopers is also repelled.

10:30 am – Kearny’s division has arrived and is now deploying on and north of Matthews to assist Schurz. Hooker’s long line is marching across the BullRun on the Warrenton Turnpike. Reynolds has deployed a forward battery (Cooper’s) near Brawner’s farm to test the confederate line; briefly and unsuccessfully.

The van of Longstreet’s Wing, Hood’s division, with General R.E. Lee, is just arriving on the field (far side of map) after its morning tramp from Thoroughfare Gap and through Gainesville.

11:00 am – Hooker’s division has deployed in the Union center.

Hood’s division, his own brigade and Col Law’s, has deployed in line arrayed across the Warrenton Turnpike. Kemper’s division is to Hood’s right near the Hampton Cole residence. More Confederates are arriving.

Krzyzanowski and Schimmelfennig, aided now by Birney of Kearny’s division, attack Thomas’ and Gregg’s brigades. Again, it is ultimately unsuccessful.

Meanwhile, Poe’s brigade (Kearny’s division) crosses Bull Run and poses a problem for the Confederate’s far left.


11:15 am – Poe initially challenges the 1st Virginia cavalry, but enfilading artillery fire from across Sudley ford, coordinated by Captain Pelham, breaks up the lone Union brigade.


A late-morning message for Longstreet arrives from Stuart, who with Robertson’s cavalry brigade is shielding Longstreet’s right on the road from Manassas. The message describes a large Union force in his front, a potential threat to Longstreet.

Mindful of its presence, Longstreet is cautious. Stuart provides the screen and monitors the Union activities – quiet so far.

This force is Porter’s 5th Corps of the Army of the Potomac.

The “Joint Order” is what Porter and McDowell are currently acting on. Of course, Longstreet cannot know this.

McDowell, by his understanding of the Joint Order, works to unite his tired 1st division (under Hatch) and 2nd division (Ricketts, now at Manassas Junction to the south) with his 3rd division (Reynolds). Porter, with the presence of the enemy in his front well established, acts cautiously – he instructs Morell to push over to the right to give help to Sigel. Griffin’s brigade is directed by Morell to do so, while Morell keeps the forces to his front at bay with skirmishing.

Summary of Morning Action – The morning was defined by a series of uncoordinated Union attacks against Jackson’s line along the unfinished railroad, which were unsupported both because they were so dispersed and because of lack of resources on hand. They posed little challenge to Jackson.

Aggressive action by Longstreet against Reynolds and Sigel carried the risk of Porter’s position on his flank. Porter’s orders warranted caution on his part. Neither force was too active.

Afternoon to follow.
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Dave Johannsen

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Thank you for posting this. I'm curious about this game, and as the review was taken down it's hard to find much information. I hope that you will post more.
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Pete Belli
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Nice map.
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robert lindsay
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what was the reason for the new map?
 
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John Curley
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Afternoon Phase, Part 1

Noon – More Union units arrive.

Stephens’ division leads Reno’s Corps onto the field, with Farnsworth’s brigade leading and turning right at the crossroads towards Sudley to support Schurz.

Pope arrives on the field from his HQ in Centreville.

Longstreet has mostly formed up on Jackson’s right; the hinge between Longstreet's left and Jackson’s right being the heights near Brawner’s Farm. These hills are dominated by batteries of Cols. S.D. Lee and Walton. Longstreet’s divisions extend south past the Manassas Gap Railroad.

The weight of Longstreet’s deployment causes Schenk and Reynolds to both redeploy backwards about ½ mile – a line along Groveton-Lewis Lane.

Noon-1:30 pm – Porter/Longstreet front: Griffin’s brigade pushes over to Porter’s right, a movement which results in some resistance and Union casualties due to Confederate artillery fire, and is called off.

Noon-2:30 pm – A terrific cannonade marks this period, between SD Lee’s and Walton’s Confederate battalions on the one hand (32 guns in all), and the five Union batteries near Groveton which include Benjamin’s battery of four 20-pounder Parrotts. It is an unequal fight, and a couple of Union guns are disabled before both sides halt firing.

1:00 pm - Pope issues orders to Heintzelman for Kearny to “attack diagonally across the front to relieve the center in the woods from pressure. Use a pretty strong force.” Over the next 45 minutes, Heinzelman and Kearny prepare for this attack, agreeing that Kearny’s tired division must rest before executing the order.

Schurz’ and Milroy’s tired brigades also rest, while the remainder of Reno’s corps arrives on the field.

2:15 pm – Pope issues a “preemptory” order to Porter to attack immediately. These are the orders that, historically, Pope issued at 4:30 pm and which did not reach Porter until nearly dark unbeknownst to Pope.

Major General Porter:
Your line of march brings you on the enemy's right flank. I desire you to push forward into action at once on the enemy's flank, and, if possible, on his rear, keeping your right in communication with General Reynolds. The enemy is massed in the woods in front of us, but can be shelled out as soon as you gain their flank. Keep heavy reserves and use your batteries— keeping well closed to our right all the time. In case you are obliged to fall back, do so to your right and rear, so as to keep you in close communication with the right wing.


2:30-3:15 pm – Longstreet, acting on the presence of the large Union force on his far right and the activity reported (Griffin’s foray), moves Wilcox’s reserve division from the left of his line behind Law’s brigade (north of Warrenton Turnpike), to the right of his line behind Jones’ division.

3:00 pm – Hatch’s exhausted division arrives on the main battlefield and now rests along the Sudley Road, stretching from Bald Hill to near Wheeler’s Farm. They are recovering from yesterday-evening’s battle at Brawner’s Farm followed by a fitful night - a brief rest under arms on the battlefield interrupted by a night-time withdrawal and march to Manassas.

3:00 pm - In front of Jackson, Union troops are organizing for the attack:

Kearny will lead with his brigades of Robinson and Birney, with Poe in reserve. Enfilading fire from Confederate batteries on the far left of the Confederate line precludes an “attack diagonally across the front” until the batteries are taken out.

At the same time, Schurz’ brigades of Krzyzanowski and Schimmelfennig are to renew their attack, with Farnsworth in reserve. They will move on Kearny’s left.

Over to the left in Groveton Woods, Grover and Carr are to supplement Milroy’s renewed attack; with Christ, Nagle and Taylor in reserve. The attack will fall on Jackson’s center.

These forces march to their attack.

3:30-3:45 pm – Kearny’s brigades leading the assault, Robinson’s and Birney’s, are the first to strike.

3:30 pm – On the Union far right, the 63 Pennsylvania (of Robinson’s brigade) captures Crenshaw’s battery. Branch’s brigade of North Carolinians responds.

3:45 pm – The matter is ultimately settled in Branch’s favor – aided by canister from Davidson’s battery and enfilading fire from D’Aquin’s from near Sudley Ford. Crenshaw’s guns are recovered, and Robinson’s beaten brigade now huddles in the woods near the Newman residence.

3:30-3:45 pm – Birney strikes Gregg’s brigade, initially causing some confusion among those troops; however the South Carolinians ultimately stand and push back Birney’s battered regiments.

Poe’s introduction to this portion of the battle changes little – Kearny’s three brigades, reduced from this and the morning action, and two of which are tiring significantly, retire and remain inactive.

3:30-3:45 pm – Schurz’ brigades of Krzyzanowski and Schimmelfennig attack at the railroad bed in the woods.

Krzyz’s and Schim’s attacks against Thomas’ brigade are a whirl-wind. Thomas’ right regiments, the 14th and 45th Georgia, repel Krzyzanowski, but Schimmelfennig’s attack threatens Thomas’ rear. Thomas’ remaining Georgia regiments bend back to near breaking and repel the Union troops. The attacks of these two Union brigades, both weakened by their morning operations, are unsuccessful.

4:00-4:30 pm – Farnsworth’s brigade comes out of reserve to the aid of Krzyzanowski and Schimmelfennig.

Crossing the high embankment with his right regiment, the 79th Massachusetts, Farnsworth is quickly a casualty, shaking that regiment.

But his 28th Massachusetts is much more successful, running over both the 35th and 45th Georgia …

…. and then routing the last regiment in the center of Thomas’ line, the 49th Georgia, on the edge of the entrance to the woods.

The 28th Mass will now face Pender’s response, as his North Carolina regiments are rousing from reserve.

Part 2 of Afternoon Phase to follow.
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John Curley
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lcrl wrote:
what was the reason for the new map?


The game is quite playable on the existing map. I made the new map for the reasons explained here.
https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/1530619/draft-replacement-a...
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John Curley
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<<I'm curious about this game, and as the review was taken down it's hard to find much information>>

Dave,
In case you don't know, the rules for the game system are in e-format on ConsimWorld in the header of this page here.
http://talk.consimworld.com/WebX/.ee6ceab/158

Waay back, shortly after Sharpsburg was published, there was a detailed article in Fire and Movement. Somewhat dated now, but IIRC it describes the game system in pretty good detail. I can try to dig that up if you're interested.
John
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John Curley
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Afternoon Phase, Part 2

3:30-4:00 pm – Milroy, supplemented with Grover and Carr of Hooker’s division, attacks Jackson’s center:

Milroy’s leading regiments of 2nd and 3rd (West) Virginia strike Trimble’s brigade, Trimble is very quickly a casualty, sending a shudder through his brigade. Col Brown rallies the Confederate troops, and a to and fro struggle results in more casualties but little progress on either side.

Grover’s leading regiments, the 16th Mass and 2nd New Hampshire, strike Lawton’s brigade (commanded by Col Douglass) obliquely, the 31st and 60th Georgia bearing the brunt of the initial attack. The 31st is forced back; the 60th bends but does not break. Further assaults by the New Englanders cause disorder to the Georgia boys, but they repel the two Union regiments. The 26th Pennsylvania, and the 1st and 11th Massachusetts regiments will lead the next assault.

Approach to assault at 3:30 pm turn.

Carr’s brigade has to overcome a high railroad embankment in its front; this being an obstacle for both attack and defense. Three New Jersey and New York regiments lead the assault, clambering over the high barrier, and then hitting Field’s brigade of Virginians. The 5th New Jersey has some success on the left, pushing back the 22nd Va Battalion. But the 5th NJ is soon repelled, the others shaken, and a counter-attack by the 40th and 55th Virginia pushes the brigade back across the high embankment from whence they came. The Union brigade’s initial assault fails.

Situation after 4:00 pm turn.

4:15-4:30 pm – Col Christ bolsters the attack; wedging between Milroy and Grover and attacking with these two brigades, while Carr screens Fields’ Confederate brigade in front of the high railroad embankment.

Christ’s attack proves devastating to Lawton’s (Douglass’) brigade; striking that tiring brigade and collapsing the left of the small Confederate salient. Trimble’s (Brown’s) regiments on the right fall back stubbornly. The railroad cut in this section falls to Union troops. Early exits reserve and pours his Virginia troopers into a counter-attack, which stems Christ’s forward progress but doesn’t push him back, yet.


3:30 pm – Meanwhile, at Bethlehem Church, an aide arrives and hands Pope’s “preemptory” attack order to Porter. Porter rides to his division commanders, Sykes (who accepts 4:45 pm) and Morell (who accepts at 4:15 pm).

4:45-5:00 pm – Christ and Milroy continue their attacks, with Early and now Forno counter-attacking. Still, the Federals are making some progress. Douglass’ and Brown’s brigades are fought out; Grover’s brigade is spent.

Nagle exits reserve and enters the woods to add his weight to the affair. The Rebels have been pushed back up to 400 yards from the railroad cut they had been defending. Johnson has roused his brigade (Starke’s division) from rest due to all the commotion to his left.

4:30-5:15 pm – Meanwhile, back to Pender and Farnsworth (NL - Morrison) – the 28th Mass retreats back into the cover of the woods in the face of Pender’s advance, and a fire-fight ensues between the North Carolinians and the Bay Staters, with the Tarheels getting the significant advantage.

Morrison retreats his brigade.

5:15 pm – … while further west, Early wheels around and hits Christ’s flank. Christ takes a bullet, and the 50th Penn regiment runs. Forno leads two Louisiana regiments in the attack to repel the 82nd Ohio. There is turmoil in the middle of the woods, and Nagle’s Union brigade approaches.


5:15 pm – Pope issues an order to McDowell to support Porter’s attack to attack the flank of the enemy and attempt to get into their rear.

5:00-6:30 pm – On the far Union left, Porter advances and deploys Morell’s and Sykes’ divisions for their assault on Longstreet’s right.

5:30-6:15 pm – Early troops, despite tiring, have stabilized the Confederate line. Still, both lines are marked with sporadic, uncoordinated fire and assaults. Nagle’s assault is stymied when he is a casualty, but Col. SG Griffin steadies the brigade for the next assault against Early.

Taylor exits reserve.


6:30 pm – The main part of Griffin’s renewed attack against Early is again stymied by Confederate fire – the 48th PA is driven to cover. And although the 2nd Maryland drives back the 31st Va, it in turn is routed by enfilading fire from the 25th Va after Early personally leads the refusal of that portion of the Confederate line.

On the west edge of the woods, Taylor brings his small but fresh brigade up against Forno.

6:15 pm – McDowell arrives from Manassas, bringing two brigades of Ricketts’ exhausted division. Ricketts’ third brigade and the division artillery is further down the road.

6:30 pm – Hatch will now move his rested division toward Reynolds’ left while Ricketts rests.


6:45 pm – Griffin continues his assault against Early’s right, but is now repulsed completely. On the Union left, Taylor pushes back Forno’s regiments, but he is now isolated in the woods with no support.

The line between Field and Carr, separated by the high embankment, is quiet.


Further to the right, Krzyzanowski, Morrison, Schimmelfennig, and Pender also do not want to suffer any more punishment and a spontaneous truce results.

6:45 pm – Pope issues orders to Sigel to demonstrate with his troops in front of Groveton to prevent the enemy there from assisting in the defense against the Porter / McDowell attack.

Final Part 3 Porter's Attack to follow (whew)
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Pete Belli
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jmcurley wrote:
Waay back, shortly after Sharpsburg was published, there was a detailed article in Fire and Movement. Somewhat dated now, but IIRC it describes the game system in pretty good detail. I can try to dig that up if you're interested.


That article was written by Civil War scholar Bill Haggart.

It was in F&M #20 back in 1980:





Still have my copy after all of these years...
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John Curley
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Afternoon/Evening Part 3 - Porter's attack

6:45 pm – As the sun sets, Buchanan’s brigade of Sykes’ division is the first to strike Longstreet’s right at the Vessel household, and, with help from AP Martin’s six Napoleons, causes Drayton’s brigade to run.


6:45 pm – Lee issues orders to Longstreet to repel the assault on his right and prevent its linking with the Union forces on Lewis Lane.

It’s growing darker after the sun has set.

7:30 pm – Following the rout of Drayton’s brigade, half of Buchanan’s brigade suffered a major reversal. But Sykes and Morell bring their other brigades up and prepare to assault Benning’s and GT Anderson’s brigades from Jones’ division, which form the right-most portion of Longstreet’s position.

Meanwhile, Hatch’s division (of McDowell’s corps) approaches.

By 8:30 pm – Six Union brigades make attempts against Longstreet at day’s end, with small effects and some casualties. Griffin’s work against Benning is rebuffed with nothing to show for its own significant casualties. Butterfield makes progress against the forward portion of GT Anderson (11th Ga), but is stopped as darkness falls. Patrick exchanges blows with Corse. Gibbon’s attack bloodily takes hold of Brit hill, but his brigade is then repulsed by Jenkins’ with relative ease as night falls. Both Meade and Seymour fail to budge Hunton’s brigade, their attacks being hampered by balky troops.

Most of the Union gains in this sector were achieved when Drayton was repulsed – the remainder of the fight was costly for the Union with little to show.

Situation at Scenario End 8:30 pm
On the far left of the Union line, Porter’s arrival has met some success with the routing of Drayton’s brigade.

Longstreet’s left is blunted and pushed into defensive mode, but with some cost to Union forces. Still, there are six other Union brigades in this sector that have yet to be engaged. Drayton’s brigade is the only CSA brigade in this sector that suffered significant losses. While Longstreet’s position appears relatively strong defensively; it doesn’t appear attractive as a jump-off point for decisive, offensive action.

The ground in front of the hinge between Longstreet and Jackson is amply covered by Confederate artillery.

On the far Union right Kearny’s and Schurz’s divisions have suffered from casualties and are fought out. On the Confederate side, AP Hill’s division, specifically the brigades of Branch, Gregg, and Thomas, have suffered some casualties but dished out more than they took; Pender helped stabilize that front and is still relatively fresh.

In the Groveton Woods, virtually all the Union brigades engaged: Milroy’s, Grover’s, Carr’s, Christ’s, and Nagle’s are fought out and exhausted. The exception is Taylor’s brigade of Hooker’s division. In the Union middle, Ferraro’s brigade stands back near Buck Hill as the lone unengaged reserve. The Union attacks in Groveton Woods fell on Ewell’s (Lawton’s) division in the middle of Jackson’s line. All brigades of that division, those of Forno, Douglass, Trimble (Brown) and Early, are now spent and exhausted.

Starke's division is fresh - two brigades from Starke’s division, Johnson’s and Stafford’s, exited from rest but did not enter the storm on their left.

The Union holds two sections of the unfinished railroad, while about ½ mile of it is in “no-mans land.” In these areas the CSA has been pushed back from its former position, but the Union losses have been high.

Jackson appears significantly stronger than the Union troops facing him.

The weaker parts of the Union position are its battered right and the gap between its right and its largely untested center at Groveton and Lewis Lane.

In the Groveton area and south of Warrenton Turnpike, Schenk’s division supplemented with Leasure’s brigade from Reno’s corps holds the middle of the overall Union line. Confederate skirmishers in the woods 5-600 yards in front of them screen off Hood’s division from the Federals. To Schurz’s left stands Reynolds’ fresh division. It welcomed the arrival, on its left-rear of Hatch’s division. North of the Conrad residence, three brigades of Ricketts’ division rest after their all day of marching starting at Gainesville early in the morning.


Longstreet’s division of RH Anderson is approaching Thoroughfare Gap and is expected on the battlefield by morning. Ricketts’ Union division will have been rested by then.

From history we know that Lee, after Pope’s impetuous attack on the evening of Aug 29, and perhaps with Longstreet's urging, was willing to wait for Pope to continue to attack. After the inaction on the morning of Aug 30, he was even prepared to continue to wait the rest of the afternoon to pass without a fight, if Pope so chose. However Pope didn't so choose - Porter's violent attack in the afternoon, and McDowell's ordering of Reynolds off of Chinn Ridge opened the door for Longstreet's sledgehammer assault.

In the situation of this replay, Pope probably would have been aggressive the following morning. Given his penchant to quickly conclude the Confederates were withdrawing, he may have interpreted the Porter / McDowell advance against Longstreet as forcing just that – and ordered an attack on all fronts.

Victory Points for entire Aug 29 battle:
Union VPs:
Confed SPs lost 223
Union VPs SP 450
Other Union VPs 10 (artillery and leaders)
Total Union VPs 460

Confederate VPs:
Union SPs lost 150
Confed VPs SP 446
Other Confed VPs 9 (artillery and leaders)
Starting Confed VPs 75 (per original scenario instructions)
Total Confed VPs 530
Confederate Marginal Victory based on casualties.
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Dave Johannsen

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jmcurley wrote:
In case you don't know, the rules for the game system are in e-format on ConsimWorld in the header of this page here.
<SNIP>
article in Fire and Movement. I can try to dig that up if you're interested.
John


John:

Thank you so much for the pointer to the rules; I am excited to take a gander. As for the article, please don't go to any trouble. Now that the copy of "Road to Washington" that was listed here for $50 has been sold, it's a lot less likely that I will be grabbing a copy anytime too soon (if I like what I see in the rules, I'll watch eBay for a while). Again, thank you for your kind offer.


Dave
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Dave Johannsen

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pete belli wrote:
That article was written by Civil War scholar Bill Haggart.

It was in F&M #20 back in 1980


Thank you for the proper bibliometric citation; I just ordered a copy from Noble Knight.

Dave

Post Script:

The article certainly piqued my interest. I'll be keeping my ear to the ground for a copy of either Road to Washington and/or Sharpsburg.
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Dave Johannsen

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jmcurley wrote:
This is a revised version of Road to Washington’s Scenario 8, “August 29.” It is played on my new map, not the map accompanying the game. The opening has historical deployments, and the morning period roughly follows historical orders and activities. The afternoon period is different. An ‘orders’ sub-system is used, as well as a number of house rules.

John:

One quick question: Are you soloing this, or playing against a live opponent? It seems like with a simulation that's this large and detailed that it might be tough to find another human being who is willing to commit to such an undertaking. (I also have ulterior motives in asking this question, as, due to a paucity of wargamers around me, almost all of gaming is solitaire.)


Dave
 
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John Curley
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Dave,
I soloed this over a period of several weeks. Agree with you about it being tough to find those willing to commit to such an undertaking. There are other more popular Civil War gaming systems of similar scale that have a large community either from which to find players or at least to help with answers to questions:
- CWB - Brigade level - interestingly a replay of 2nd Bull Run Aug 29 is here https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/1658675/second-bull-run-gam...
- GBACW - Regimental - Red Badge of Courage here https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/6861/red-badge-courage
This game is an example of the current generation of several following the venerable Terrible Swift Sword game.
- LOB - Regimental - related to CWB - but this system does not have a Bull Run simulation if that's what you're after.

There's a fair amount of overlap between them, but each emphasize different things. The late 1970's Command Perspectives game that I replayed emphasizes tactical issues but at a cost of playing speed. The newer systems above put more emphasis on C&C - of course important at this scale - so that GBACW and CWB/LOB each now have their unique way of providing this "brake". I layered a derivative of LOB's command system on top of the tactical detail of the Command Perspectives game, and I'm sure that's too much for most.

The Haggart article's thesis on tactical detail I think still has validity today. Edit after rereading: The other regimental systems have improved their respective tactical simulations since the article was published; IMHO the Battles of the War of the Rebellion system is still better (but has areas to address).

The newer systems though, have many more Civil War battles simulated. They all generally play well solo.

John C.
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Dave Johannsen

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jmcurley wrote:
Dave,
I soloed this over a period of several weeks.


John:

Thanks for the information. I've got Stonewall Jackson's Way on the table right now (I've read the rules and am setting up the first scenario) and I've got August Fury on the way from the GeekMarket. It will be interesting to compare the two systems.

Again, thank you for all the information.


Dave
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Thomas Beach

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Really appreciate your replay and excellent photos, John. Thanks very much.

As a player of both CWB, RSS and LoB, I would be curious to know what your Command/Orders house rules were which you grafted to this game. RTW remains, for me, the holy grail of Civil War tactical simulations. But Dean's Orders concepts are quite fantastic in their own right and, as you pointed out, something missing from RTW/Sharpsburg. So I would enjoy finding out what you felt worked and didn't work. We all have lives to live. So please, if and/or when it becomes convenient for you.

And yes, the new rules edition available on the CSW header are wonderfully done, making this game and system even that much more accessible.

BTW John... if you'd ever consider attending Expo in Tempe some year, or Origins or Buckeye Game Fest, I wouldn't hesitate in committing to doing a weeklong grand scenario playing with you as well as yourself, Dave.
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John Curley
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Tom, See my geekmail to you.
 
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jmcurley wrote:
Dave,

There's a fair amount of overlap between them, but each emphasize different things. The late 1970's Command Perspectives game that I replayed emphasizes tactical issues but at a cost of playing speed. The newer systems above put more emphasis on C&C - of course important at this scale - so that GBACW and CWB/LOB each now have their unique way of providing this "brake".


John, inspired by your posts on the game I finally located an unpunched copy of "Road to Washington" at a price that I could live with, so I pulled the trigger. In order to learn more about the battle before jumping into the game, I also ordered a copy of Hennessy's "Return to Bull Run." I am currently up to my chin in learning (and absolutely loving) Advanced Squad Leader (ASL) so I may not get to RtW all that soon, but certainly intend to do so within the next year or so (once I'm more comfortable and am able to consistently apply ASL rules - I don't want to mix learning these two games). Thanks for showing such obvious passion for this game - you certainly motivated me to seek out a copy.

Dave
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Except for the occasional 'unusual' title, the Civil War 'battle' level did not really interest me. One of my first, following AH's Gettysburg '77 and The Wargamer's "Little Round Top" was "Road to Washington". The article in F&M #20 really helped understanding 'what could be done' with the system.
( I note, though, that the tactical diagram numbers appear 'off' despite the validity of what they show and generally what they say.)

Later, the CWBS showed what was 'missing' from the C&C level of the game.

I did manage to play a friend with his copy of SHARPSBURG. In SHARPSBURG, the effect of 'mostly no command rules' works because its distinct situation provides for just a few command rules.
As I dimly remember, there was a break of sorts on committing multiple Union corps at one time but otherwise you could commit any corps but at a substantial VP penalty apparently tied to the amount of damage they could do. Ergo, if you released the corps, you needed to really make their efforts count. If you didn't get a good effort from the corps, the large negative on the VPs for release would crimp your chance for victory. After playing it, it seemed like the penalties were carefully calculated.
This same freedom,though, isn't quite as applicable for RtW. There's a bit more maneuver room and thus some dampener on 'instant response' is needed. Although LOB might have the proper turn length, using the CWBS "August Fury" ( preferably from the 2nd edition in "THREE BATTLES OF MANASSAS") command rules and leader values for command would work best, I think. You would just handle the command aspects every other turn (on the half-hour) although you could roll for initiative on any turn. The chance of a "Loose Cannon" might prove enough of a brake on excess use.
One advantage the CWBS "August Fury" had going for it was the addition of a map to the West and the chance that the gap might be held against Lee and Longstreet. Unfortunately, it did require a certain amount of 'steering' the Union under these circumstances. It's still a mighty fine compliment to ROAD TO WASHINGTON.


 
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Dave,

If you've ordered the original AUGUST FURY, you can go to the MMP "The Gamers" archive and likely download the AUGUST FURY II exclusive rules (from THREE BATTLES OF MANASSAS) to play with a slightly revised situation.
You can likely also download the most recent standard series rules (which I think are in the 4.0 revision but might still be only 3.2).
Of course, you could get THREE BATTLES OF MANASSAS as well, to obtain a complete package. (TBoM has three linking maps for the 1861 First Battle, the 1862 Second Battle, and the 1863 potential for a Third Battle.)

BTW, my very first CWBS title was AUGUST FURY, purchased on the strength of my knowledge from ROAD to WASHINGTON and the use off two maps with the further West expanse towards Thoroughfare Gap available.


Although I did enjoy the CWB/RSS (which has now become the LOB system), the regimental action has still been abstracted on tactical detail. Although you can maneuver the regiments tactically, still, the greater detail of what those regiments are doing within the hex has been abstracted.

I think the COMMMAND PERSPECTIVES tactical treatment remains one of the best available for seeing brigade and regimental action.

I remember reading with fascination the 'standing up' rules in Road To Washington. The idea that you had to have the men stand up to better generate higher levels of firepower necessary to injure the opposing troops .....but likewise exposing one's onw troops to injury was interesting of itself. The inclination of the troops to promptly seek cover/lie-down again also intereting and added some Humanity to the counters.

I remember playing the Grover's Attack scenario and quite enjoying it in RtW. It was fun to attempt an escalating assault (in Upton style), more 'Indian Rush' approaches (to keep the opposition under fire as you approached), and full brigade assaults if the opposition seemed fatigued, low on ammo, or had wavering morale ('Shaken', for example).

Revising this system might produce a 'Monster' for the larger battles but might be a wonderful system for something like Brandy Station.
(I first encountered the high firepower (when dismounted) Union cavalry in RtW along with the idea there had to be horse-holders (HH) for the dismounted cavalry. In RtW, though not told to do so, you could see that the Union cavalry were best used to rush to a blocking position mounted...and then dismounted to produce a small numbers and high firepower blocking/delay force.

 
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