$20.00
$15.00
$5.00
Recommend
 
 Thumb up
 Hide
8 Posts

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Board Game Design » Board Game Design

Subject: Paper Quality for cards? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Daniel Johansson
msg tools
mbmb
Hi!
I'm working on some early prototypes of a card game.
I want to print the cards in my own printer, but I do not know what quality is good for this purpose:

- it should be pretty thick paper to avoid "flimsyness".
- it should be kind of smooth to allow shuffling of the cards: "glidy" quality.

Do you have any recommendations? I would prefer not to use cards sleeves for this particular prototype which normally is a great option. Hence the need of a paper resembling card quality.

Thanks!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andrew J.
United States
Missouri
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I have had great luck with the print-n-fold 4x2 technique. Basically, you stack the cards just above their card backs and then flip the back over, folding them into a card shape. If you're not using sleeves, you then glue the two sides together. I use this method with regular cardstock and it produces great-quality cards that are nice and thick. For a more upscale option, use linen paper and you may get more durable cards.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
B C Z
United States
Reston
Virginia
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Making Cards: You’ll never use your old method again.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
patrick mullen
United States
Washington
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I've been doing a lot of research on this myself. From what I've seen, here are the main methods:

1. Index cards or blank poker cards (I ordered 1000 from game crafter for 50$). Write on them with a sharpie. No printing, no cutting, and great when you are still designing stuff. If you have 50-100 cards, and keep simple design style, writing them each will take less than 1 hour, which is faster than any printing method I have done.

2. Print on regular printer paper, sleeve with magic cards. I have not personally tried this and skipped to stage 3. It's a good method as your cards will shuffle well, there is no transparency, and you don't need to print full cards - just whatever text you need. Still probably want a good paper cutter to cut in bulk.

3. Print on card stock, cut with guilotine paper cutter. Get some cardstock from staples (120gsm works ok, 200gsm is better). Print 9x9 cards per page with no spacing between them for less cuts. Paper cutter is bad for skinny cuts as well. 100 cards ~30 minutes to cut. Corner cutter is a nice to have as well. Aside from some slight transparency, I find these very serviceable and pretty easy to print updates for a game that is still in design but further along.

4. Something more fancy as was mentioned involving different types of paper (linen, linen paper etc) and gluing. I would do this when I'm really happy with the direction and want to play with more strangers - although I've been doing some playtesting of other people's games and mode 3 or even 2 don't really put me off. It feels better to have more complete feeling cards, but I don't know when it is worth the effort.

5. Print on demand a copy. I think I would opt for this over 4. It's slightly more expensive, but also a lot less effort. I would choose this when the game is ready for blind playtesting.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Daniel Johansson
msg tools
mbmb
Thanks for all great suggestions. I have previously tried gluing etc but it is quite a hassle. This is ok for a close-to-final prototype.
My latest try was printing on a thicker paper and then just cutting out the cards. No gluing, no card sleeves. The thickness was fine but it turned out that it was impossible to shuffle the cards. The paper surface was too rough and the cards stuck to each other.
Hence, I am currently looking for a thick paper but with a smooth enough quality to allow easy shuffling.


Any advice is appreciated!
Thanks again!!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
patrick mullen
United States
Washington
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Did you use cardstock? I just went back and looked at the stock I use, it was 200gsm not 120, so sorry for that. It's not EASY to shuffle, but it is possible to shuffle. You may try some alternate shuffling techniques if you haven't learned them - overhand is my favorite.

Also have you tried sleeving them? That can help with stickyness in a pinch.

Also if you didn't corner punch... corner punch. You can get one for under 10$ and that goes a long way to help shufflability.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Confusion Under Fire
United Kingdom
Warrington
Cheshire
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
dabuel wrote:
Thanks for all great suggestions. I have previously tried gluing etc but it is quite a hassle. This is ok for a close-to-final prototype.
My latest try was printing on a thicker paper and then just cutting out the cards. No gluing, no card sleeves. The thickness was fine but it turned out that it was impossible to shuffle the cards. The paper surface was too rough and the cards stuck to each other.
Hence, I am currently looking for a thick paper but with a smooth enough quality to allow easy shuffling.


Any advice is appreciated!
Thanks again!!


If you print onto A4 label paper and then laminate the paper before sticking this onto whatever card weight you want you will be able to shuffle the cards very easily. In fact the only problem you might encounter is if the deck is too large the top cards may slide off the top. I have 2 printers one is a cheaper printer and has a problem with card above 120gsm whereas my other printer which I use for anything I want to keep will print on 200gsm no problem.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Joe Ryan
United States
South Carolina
flag msg tools
Try going to your local print shop. I had a prototype made for between $5-10 using gloss card stock and they also cut it. No rounded corners or perfect borders, but it was quick plus the cards shuffle and glide really well.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.