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kot player
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I have a 6 x 2.5 plastic folding table that i would like to put a play surface on.

However i am wondering if it is possible without using plywood because of budget & space constraints.

Would it somehow be possible to stretch the fabric over just the foam and plastic folder table? Perhaps with some kind of tape or clever thinking such as sticking pieces of wood under the plastic and then stapling the stretched fabric into it?

The fabric and foam I will be using are Nylon velvet speed cloth and Volara 1/4" foam from http://www.yourautotrim.com
 
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Richard Urich
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Stuart
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In the past, I did something similar with curtain clips (similar to http://www.target.com/p/-/A-14101351) and rope under the table.
 
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Stephanie Prince
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Can you sew? You could put a drawstring or elastic in the fabric- like a fitted bedsheet.
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kot player
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RichardU wrote:
In the past, I did something similar with curtain clips (similar to http://www.target.com/p/-/A-14101351) and rope under the table.

Those seem like a great idea.
How well did it hold up while you were using it?
I assume you clamped them onto each end then tied them to each other?
slprince wrote:
Can you sew? You could put a drawstring or elastic in the fabric- like a fitted bedsheet.

This seems like a really efficient way to do it however I can't sew at all.
How would you go about doing something like that?
Perhaps I may know someone who can do it for me.
 
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Ryan Byrd
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Griffin
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Similar to the suggestion above...

Put eye holes into the edges so you can stretch a rope or bungle cable between eyes under the table.
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TTDG
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Holes may rip, and rope is also a 'point' for stretching.

Instead, build a wooden frame that is a tight fit against the edge of the table. Place your fabric on the table lapping over the edge. Then push your tight frame down from the top. Friction will keep the fabric tight, and even everywhere. (You may need an L shaped stop to keep the frame from falling down.) You are in effect making a quilters hoop.
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But the drumbeat strains of the night remain in the rhythm of the newborn day.
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    PVC is dirt cheap, and remarkably useful.

    Cut the pipe to the same width as your fabric. Roll the ends of your fabric around it on each end a couple of times. Clip the ends of your pipes and fabric with clothes pins or (if your budget allows) cheap clamps from the hardware store. Hang the pipes just beyond the edge of the table.

    The weight of the pipes on each end of your fabric should put a bit of a stretch on it, enough to make a flat surface on top of your tables. Portable.

    Option two is to build an entire frame out of PVC, two six-footers and two 2.5 footers, elbow joints. Attach the fabric to the two small ends so you can roll it up between uses, assemble the long pipes in place when you sit down to play.

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Philip Kitching
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How about 'tablecloth clips' or 'drawing board clips'

E.g. https://www.amazon.ca/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/167-5247433-1984821?u...
 
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Richard Urich
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kotplayer wrote:
RichardU wrote:
In the past, I did something similar with curtain clips (similar to http://www.target.com/p/-/A-14101351) and rope under the table.

Those seem like a great idea.
How well did it hold up while you were using it?
I assume you clamped them onto each end then tied them to each other?


It worked great, but I did take it off frequently and so I have no idea if the rope would have stayed tight for long periods. And if anywhere wasn't tight, it was a 30-second fix.

I just used a bunch of clips all over at first since a lot came in the bag. Eventually I reduced it to I think 12 (3 on each side). It was probably still overkill, but it worked and was quick and easy to set up. I used four pieces of rope. From picture below, ropes were: 1 looped through 1, 12 and 6, 7; 1 through 2 and 8; 1 through 3, 4 and 9, 10; and 1 through 5 and 11.

-1--2--3-
12......4
|.......|
11......5
|.......|
10......6
-9--8--7-
 
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kot player
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ryan_c_byrd wrote:
Similar to the suggestion above...

Put eye holes into the edges so you can stretch a rope or bungle cable between eyes under the table.


I feel like it would just ruin the fabric and have a high chance of ripping.

ThroughTheDeckGlass wrote:
Holes may rip, and rope is also a 'point' for stretching.

Instead, build a wooden frame that is a tight fit against the edge of the table. Place your fabric on the table lapping over the edge. Then push your tight frame down from the top. Friction will keep the fabric tight, and even everywhere. (You may need an L shaped stop to keep the frame from falling down.) You are in effect making a quilters hoop.


I'm not sure how I would go about building something like that, it seems like some pretty advanced level of woodworking. It's honestly a great idea and really clever but just using a piece of MDF would be so much easier and have the same effect of not being portable / easily stored. I would like to know more about it though, how would you go about doing this?

Sagrilarus wrote:
PVC is dirt cheap, and remarkably useful.

Cut the pipe to the same width as your fabric. Roll the ends of your fabric around it on each end a couple of times. Clip the ends of your pipes and fabric with clothes pins or (if your budget allows) cheap clamps from the hardware store. Hang the pipes just beyond the edge of the table.

The weight of the pipes on each end of your fabric should put a bit of a stretch on it, enough to make a flat surface on top of your tables. Portable.

Option two is to build an entire frame out of PVC, two six-footers and two 2.5 footers, elbow joints. Attach the fabric to the two small ends so you can roll it up between uses, assemble the long pipes in place when you sit down to play.



I might try this as it sounds really simple and easy, it also won't damage the fabric at all so if it doesn't work then i can already try again with another option.

Postmark wrote:
How about 'tablecloth clips' or 'drawing board clips'

E.g. https://www.amazon.ca/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/167-5247433-1984821?u...


So simple yet so effective, I will definitely have to try this method.

RichardU wrote:
It worked great, but I did take it off frequently and so I have no idea if the rope would have stayed tight for long periods. And if anywhere wasn't tight, it was a 30-second fix.

I just used a bunch of clips all over at first since a lot came in the bag. Eventually I reduced it to I think 12 (3 on each side). It was probably still overkill, but it worked and was quick and easy to set up. I used four pieces of rope. From picture below, ropes were: 1 looped through 1, 12 and 6, 7; 1 through 2 and 8; 1 through 3, 4 and 9, 10; and 1 through 5 and 11.

-1--2--3-
12......4
|.......|
11......5
|.......|
10......6
-9--8--7-


I think you could get away with only using 8 clips (1,13; 2,4; 10,9; 6,7) and 4 pieces of rope. I will try the other options first but I will definitely keep this in mind when comparing.
 
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D. Chase

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If you want a permanent solution, you can make a paste with white glue and brush it on the table, then lay the fabric on top of it. This will keep it from moving around and it is relatively inexpensive.
 
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