$15.00
$5.00
$30.00
$20.00
Recommend
35 
 Thumb up
 Hide
6 Posts

The Others» Forums » Reviews

Subject: The Others is more tense and exciting than the others. rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Dale Quimpo
Philippines
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
The Others is now my favorite ONE vs MANY game.

I am a HUGE fan of games with an "overlord". Descent (both editions), Fury of Dracula (2nd and 3rd edition), Catacombs, Middle-Earth Quest, Mansions of Madness (1st edition), Last Night on Earth and Doom are games that I own and have enjoyed playing in the past. The Others is better than all of them. I've played The Others around 12 times, 10 times as the Sins Player and twice as a hero, and every single game has been a super-exciting, down-to-the-wire, pray-to-the-dice-gods death massacre of tentacles, exploding dice and "Jesus Christ holy shit" moments. I haven't had this much fun with a ONE vs MANY game since my troll bashed his way to a team-party kill with one attack in Descent back in 2011.


SUPER SIMPLE

One of the best things about The Others is that how to play the game doesn't get in the way of actually playing the game. Everything about the game is simple, without sacrificing the gameplay and everything flows much better because of the simplicity. The game is more exciting because you are focused on playing the game, instead of looking up rules or reading stats.

Easy to explain
The flow of the game is super easy to explain - A hero moves 2 spaces, then either attacks the monsters or cleanses the tokens. After each hero, the Sins player may move 1 monster 2 spaces and attack the hero.

Simple and vicious combat system
Combat is the most important part of games like this - it's practically 90% of the game and combat in The Others is pretty much perfect. It's dead simple. Both players roll dice, dice explode for more hits, you roll some more and then you count how many hits you rolled, and how many blocks you rolled.

Monsters aren't complicated
The stats of all the monsters in the game are the same. This gets rids of all the cards that each monster typically needs and reduces the mental overhead of playing the game. Every game will have the same set of 4 monsters and they each have a role to play, and it's easy to teach players. "The brown ones are weak, but they do something when I summon them. The grey ones are stronger. The one with the black base is the strongest, but he's usually a target for you guys. Oh, and this big one you run away from." No looking up keywords.

There's no tracking of HP for monsters. This is fantastic. In most games, monsters basically fall into 3 categories anyway - monsters that die in 1-hit, monsters that die in 2-hits, and monsters that die in 3-hits. The Others has managed to distill this by incorporating all of that in the probability of dice results versus how many hits a monster needs to die. Amazing.

Has solid variety between Sins despite the simplicity
The Sin cards together with the Sin power are what add the variety to the 2 different Sins that come with the base game. The cards are powerful and thematic enough to really make you feel that you are playing versus a different Sin when you sit down to play.

Tokens aren't overly excessive
Even the tokens are simple. "Fire and corruption damage you guys, the pentagrams add dice to monsters, the sun-looking tokens are spawn points, and the big square ones let me draw extra cards. The blue ones give you bonuses." Again, the simplicity of the tokens do not take away from the enjoyment of the game, in fact they make it more exciting because players become more focused about how to win when they aren't drowning in how to play the game.


TENSE and EXCITING

No corridor blocking
The worst thing about ONE vs MANY games is that it just really boils down to blocking corridors. Descent 1.0, Descent 2.0 and Imperial Assault all fall to this issue. It's boring, and even though games like this are about combat, players aren't excited to sit down and play slog through the stormtroopers or slog through the big base monsters to win. You take one damage if you disengage from any number of monsters, and it's painful - but not tedious. The fact that KILLING HEROES is the Sins player's only goal makes it all come together.

Death is permanent and painful
In most games, hero death is something that doesn't really come with a heavy price. Respawning is easy, and it's really more of a time-out. Here not only does hero death move the Sins Player closer to winning with every death, you NEVER see that hero again and you lose out on all their special abilities that might be very important to winning.

The avatar is scary - for both sides
When the avatar comes into play, this usually means the game is nearly done - either the heroes are going to end it by killing the avatar, or the avatar will kill somebody and win it for the Sins player. The ending is down to the wire because the Sins player wants to use the avatar to finish off the heroes, but at the same time, it's a dangerous gamble. Big monsters in other games usually just block corridors. There is a healthy amount of respect for the avatar.

Exploding dice!!!
Nothing is more satisfying than rolling a bunch of dice and seeing them explode in crits again and again! A lot of awesome rolls have led to heroes wiping out entire rooms or an unsuspecting hero tripping up and dying in a giant fireball of death. This is my favorite mechanic in all of boardgaming.


VERY TACTICAL

Lot of choices
There are important choices to be made on both sides when playing the game, do you want to go accomplish the mission, or put out some fires first, or maybe you need to help a teammate on the other side of the map. Games can be won or lost because you decided to push forward to rush something instead of putting out the fire in this room first. Even when taking damage there is a choice to be made as to which corruption bonus will be removed. Taking corruption or not when attacking is also a vital choice to be made. The Sins player has similar choices when it comes to playing cards, which heroes to target, and when to use the acolyte special ability. Each scenario feels different, each hero and each monster has a role to play.

Tactical positioning
Heroes have to really decide which of them will attack the monsters, which heroes will stay together, who will go alone, which areas they need to tackle first, should they be attacking together, which items go to which heroes. I haven't seen this level of tactical cooperation in any of the other games I've played.


BE PREPARED. OR BE CONSUMED.
The Others slowly grew on me. When I first played it, I was ok with it. As I played it more, I began to realize and see how much I liked the simplicity and the "in your face"-ness of it. Every single action you do is important because the game is so tight.

You know you're playing a crazy good game when you feel that your side is winning at the same time that the other side feels that THEIR side is winning, and when you feel like your side is losing, the other side ALSO feels like they are losing.

Stop looking for the perfect ONE vs MANY game. This is it.
52 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Wouter Dhondt
Belgium
Anzegem
flag msg tools
My armor is contempt. My shield is disgust. My sword is hatred. In the Emperor's name, let none survive.
badge
Song of my soul, my voice is dead; Die thou, unsung, as tears unshed. Shall dry and die in Lost Carcosa.
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks for the review. Makes me more excited to try this game.

Quote:
The worst thing about ONE vs MANY games is that it just really boils down to blocking corridors. Descent 1.0, Descent 2.0 and Imperial Assault all fall to this issue.

Descent yes, but you can't block corridors in Imperial Assault, only slow the heroes down, right?
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Greg Justice
United States
Colorado
flag msg tools
I am the great Cornholio!
mbmbmbmbmb
kookoobah wrote:
BE PREPARED. OR BE CONSUMED.
The Others slowly grew on me. When I first played it, I was ok with it. As I played it more, I began to realize and see how much I liked the simplicity and the "in your face"-ness of it. Every single action you do is important because the game is so tight.

You know you're playing a crazy good game when you feel that your side is winning at the same time that the other side feels that THEIR side is winning, and when you feel like your side is losing, the other side ALSO feels like they are losing.


My thoughts exactly. Great review!
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Will Fox
msg tools
Great review. Now I just get more and more sad, that my group has a hard time to find a date where we could meet til the end of the year.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Javi Zamorano
Spain
flag msg tools
mbmbmb
Wow... great and enticing review.

I have to admid I ended up hating overlord games as I tend to be the guy playing the baddies trying hard to make other players have fun (heroes). I really like bad guys, but most times I find they lack of cohesion and real identity. That's why I love Fury of Dracula; you actually feel it and it's FUN. I don't find that inmersive to be a random guy sending random hordes (goblins, trolls, a dragon, undead folks...) into players to be slayed and feed their sense of aventure.

This is why months ago I desisted on keep tracking The Others (it's still 2 months far to be published on my country) and started to lean towards ALL VS AI models like the recent Deep Madness (on KS), but man your review f*cked up my brain. Now I'm considering switching my savings back to The Others.

TY for that so focused review.

J.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.