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Subject: Professional Game Teacher rss

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Quantum Jack
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I just got a (maybe) joking offer to be paid to teach someone Magic Realm. While this is really unlikely, it makes me wonder:

Are there individuals or game groups that would PAY a professional to come and teach them a game?

Obviously, it would have to be a high caliber teacher. Able to answer all questions with little to no reference to the rulebook. Must be able to adapt to different learning styles, and be generally pleasant andd entertaining while doing so.

Nonetheless, If there were such a market (to any profitable level) I feel like I could (through study and play) be that teacher. But I suspevt.many here would also jump at such a chance.


Anyways, just an interesting thought to consider.
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Greg
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Rodney Smith?

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Quantum Jack
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In person.
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Greg
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Never heard of it, but if such a career was feasible, I would be all over it.

If anyone wants to pay me to teach them a game, I await your GM.
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Justin Case
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Quantum_Jack wrote:
Are there individuals or game groups that would PAY a professional to come and teach them a game?

In the world of classic games -- chess, bridge, backgammon, and others -- paying for instruction is quite common. I'm not sure that the idea would transfer well into the world of hobby/designer games though; it seems to me that the approach to games is a little different.

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Greg
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I suppose no one would arrange for someone to come to there house to teach them how to play some simple game. It wouldn't be worth the effort. But, what if the game was something like Magic Realm or one these really complex war games or an 18xx game? Those games could take a considerable amount of time to learn.

Would anyone consider the time saved in learning those games worth paying someone something to teach them, if they knew the teacher was reliable? House visits seem a little much, but maybe at a convention or over a video call?

I don't know. Again, I doubt there is any real money to be made there, but it might be a fun endeavor to try.
 
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C M
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So you want to get a job at a game cafe being the rules person?
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Rick Collins
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The most common way to get some sort of compensation for teaching people how to play games is to become an official demo'er for a game company. You get compensated in games predominantly.

For example, this program (http://www.dexposure.com/envoy/) lets you earn games from multiple companies.
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Mark T
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If the question is "why don't people pay to be taught a game?", I thought no the answer is YouTube. Why would I pay to learn a game when there are plenty of videos for free online that will do almost the same thing? Admittedly, the personal touch and ability to get questions answered in real time is not there, but I don't think I'd pay for that to begin with.
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Stephen Williams
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Well, a lot of these newfangled board game cafes seem to have "game gurus" who wander around and help the customers with games upon request. Sometimes the waiter/waitress doubles as a guru, but I've seen shops with exclusive gurus.

I suspect that's the closest you'd get to being a professional game teacher, for modern hobby games. While you may in fact be able to make a living of it, I doubt the pay is very much above minimum wage.
 
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'Bernard Wingrave'
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Publishers often have demo people at conventions. I imagine that at least some of the demo people are paid.
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Joke Meister
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Another approach would be to turn boardgaming into an event where you teach rules as part of that event. There is actually a company in HK now that does this and they seem to be targeting a mix of open "board game socials" (which sounds like a normal board game cafe) and corporate/private events.

http://www.pressstart.com.hk/

PS I haven't actually been so no idea what the event is actually like.
 
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L S
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Gambiteer wrote:
Quantum_Jack wrote:
Are there individuals or game groups that would PAY a professional to come and teach them a game?

In the world of classic games -- chess, bridge, backgammon, and others -- paying for instruction is quite common. I'm not sure that the idea would transfer well into the world of hobby/designer games though; it seems to me that the approach to games is a little different.

There's tons of games where people pay for instruction on how to play the game better. That said, these master classes are completely different from paying for somebody to teach you the rules.

In regard to the requirements of the teacher, we're looking at a little more than being "able to answer all questions with little to no reference to the rulebook"... if you want to actually take money for coaching, distinguishing yourself as a top-contender in highly visible tournaments would be a fine start.

If you shoot for that angle (i.e. master-level teacher who coaches expert players on strategy and execution), there should be a market for that, at least in respect to popular games with a highly competitive scene. At least it works for Chess, MtG, and various online strategy games.

Teaching game rules to beginners, however, isn't a marketable proposition in my opinion. Before you even begin to look for or consider paying a coach, you already have to be quite highly invested in a game.
 
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Wim van Gruisen
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Randombias wrote:
Gambiteer wrote:
Quantum_Jack wrote:
Are there individuals or game groups that would PAY a professional to come and teach them a game?

In the world of classic games -- chess, bridge, backgammon, and others -- paying for instruction is quite common. I'm not sure that the idea would transfer well into the world of hobby/designer games though; it seems to me that the approach to games is a little different.

There's tons of games where people pay for instruction on how to play the game better. That said, these master classes are completely different from paying for somebody to teach you the rules.

In regard to the requirements of the teacher, we're looking at a little more than being "able to answer all questions with little to no reference to the rulebook"... if you want to actually take money for coaching, distinguishing yourself as a top-contender in highly visible tournaments would be a fine start.

If you shoot for that angle (i.e. master-level teacher who coaches expert players on strategy and execution), there should be a market for that, at least in respect to popular games with a highly competitive scene. At least it works for Chess, MtG, and various online strategy games.

Teaching game rules to beginners, however, isn't a marketable proposition in my opinion. Before you even begin to look for or consider paying a coach, you already have to be quite highly invested in a game.

I think that you're quite wrong there. I know a couple of people who earn money teaching bridge to newbies. Of course you don't have to learn it like that, but it helps to get the base covered.
Bridge clubs, like chess clubs (and possibly other abstract game clubs as well) usually organise lessons for newbies as well, hoping to get new members in that way. These lessons are usually done by club members here in the Netherlands, who don't get paid. The teachers who do get paid, don't get enough to quit their day jobs, it's just a little extra for them. Basically, if you don't love the game, don't become a teacher; there's not enough money in it to make it worth your while.
 
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Jeremy Mease
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Yeah people get paid but they have videos... it's too easy to get on youtube for free to watch instructional videos.

Case in point:


I fixed my own headlight. I fixed my own laptop screen. I am trying to fix my own ipad screen.

I break a lot of screens dang it
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Whymme wrote:
Randombias wrote:
Gambiteer wrote:
Quantum_Jack wrote:
Are there individuals or game groups that would PAY a professional to come and teach them a game?

In the world of classic games -- chess, bridge, backgammon, and others -- paying for instruction is quite common. I'm not sure that the idea would transfer well into the world of hobby/designer games though; it seems to me that the approach to games is a little different.

There's tons of games where people pay for instruction on how to play the game better. That said, these master classes are completely different from paying for somebody to teach you the rules.

In regard to the requirements of the teacher, we're looking at a little more than being "able to answer all questions with little to no reference to the rulebook"... if you want to actually take money for coaching, distinguishing yourself as a top-contender in highly visible tournaments would be a fine start.

If you shoot for that angle (i.e. master-level teacher who coaches expert players on strategy and execution), there should be a market for that, at least in respect to popular games with a highly competitive scene. At least it works for Chess, MtG, and various online strategy games.

Teaching game rules to beginners, however, isn't a marketable proposition in my opinion. Before you even begin to look for or consider paying a coach, you already have to be quite highly invested in a game.

I think that you're quite wrong there. I know a couple of people who earn money teaching bridge to newbies. Of course you don't have to learn it like that, but it helps to get the base covered.
Bridge clubs, like chess clubs (and possibly other abstract game clubs as well) usually organise lessons for newbies as well, hoping to get new members in that way. These lessons are usually done by club members here in the Netherlands, who don't get paid. The teachers who do get paid, don't get enough to quit their day jobs, it's just a little extra for them. Basically, if you don't love the game, don't become a teacher; there's not enough money in it to make it worth your while.


I'd reckon this would be a part-time position? At least with this, there isn't any lost opportunity with time. Some passions and interests, it can be difficult to pursue if it isn't full time.
 
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