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1846: The Race for the Midwest» Forums » Rules

Subject: Backtracking rss

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Franklin Millar
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Maybe this is a dumb question, but what exactly is meant by "backtracking" when tracing routes? For example, where a green tile has a connected hexside C from which track forks into two branches curving toward hexsides A and B, can a route be traced which enters A and exits B (turning against the acute angle)? Or may routes only trace through A-C or B-C and vice versa?
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Pete Goch
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Here's an example:



You can travel from one hex side of the straight section of track to the other or from one hex side of the curved section of track to the other but you can't enter from the straight side (top), travel to where it meets the curved section and then reverse and exit from the other side of the curved section (bottom right).
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Franklin Millar
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Thanks, that's what I assumed from physics but I wanted to confirm.
 
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David Damerell
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Doomclown wrote:
Thanks, that's what I assumed from physics but I wanted to confirm.


I'm not sure where physics comes into it; it's perfectly physically possible to reverse a train down the other branch at such a junction, and practical if it's of a sort you can drive from both ends. It's just 18xx trains that can't do it.

Bear in mind (and here I risk 1846 having some totally oddball rule) that you can exit a station on any side except the one you came in.
 
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J C Lawrence
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The general rule is that a route may enter a hex and then follow any single continuous arc until it either exits the hex or encounters a revenue center, and in the latter case it may then follow any other single continuous arc, either to an edge or to another revenue center, ad infinitum, without arcs or edges repeating.
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Bruce Murphy
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I'd be a little careful about "arc". I've seen some of your track. Perhaps "smooth line" is closer, specifically to avoid the case above. Another way to think of this is that the reverse in the tile above ends up touching too many edges (3).

Of course, with Lawson track, you're explicitly permitted to do angles as everyone has to, so that track is easier to run.

B>
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J C Lawrence
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Yeah, that's why the "general" qualifier.

 
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Will Beckley
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clearclaw wrote:
Yeah, that's why the "general" qualifier.



Whoa! What is this from?
 
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J C Lawrence
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It is a fragment of a map, generated by by ps18xx, for a prototype. The white track, normally used to represent dual gauge, is in this case used to represent that the particular track segment can be used by multiple trains.
 
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Bruce Murphy
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But can they reverse on it?

B>
 
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