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Napoleon at Waterloo» Forums » Rules

Subject: Help - Combat Ratios rss

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mossy tangle
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My 8YO is finally old enough to play decent games, and we're trying to figure out if wargaming is a direction we want to go. Strike Zone One and Napoleon at Waterloo are nice and free, so we crafted them this weekend. My wargame experience is minimal, so most of these rules are new to me, and I'm not great at math.

We're completely baffled by the combat ratios. I know I somehow have to reduce the attacking total of 9 and defending total of 7 to one of the ratios on the combat resolution chart, but I can't figure out how to do it?
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Clive Cleland
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Relevant part of section 6.2 of the rules:
Quote:
For example, if eleven Combat Strength Points attack four Combat Strength Points, the Combat Ratio is simplified to '2 to 1.' Rations (sic) are always rounded off in favor of the defender.


In this case 11:4 becomes 2:1, even though it's closer to 3:1 the advantage goes to the defender.

Or in other, other words, and only for calculating the ratio, increase the defender's CSP until you can reach a known ratio - then use that ratio.
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Brian Train
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Ratios in these older simpler games are almost always "x to 1" or x:1.
Divide the number of combat factors on both sides by the smaller number of combat factors.

So 9 to 7 becomes:

= (9 divided by 7) to (7 divided by 7)
= 1.28 to 1

and the ratio is always "rounded off" in favour of the defender, so you would roll on the 1:1 column.

13 to 7 would be 1 to 1, but 14 to 7 would be 2 to 1.

Brian
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Tony B
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Exactly. Just divide the two numbers and round down in favour of the defender

Example 1: attacker has 8 and defender has 4. 4 goes into 8 twice. Odds are 2-1.

Example 2: attacker has 4 and defender has 8. 4 goes into 8 twice. Odds are 1-2 as defender is stronger than the attacker.

Example 3: attacker has 13 and defender has 8. 8 goes into 13 once. Odds are 1-1. You disregard the remainders.

Example 4: attacker has 13 and fender has 6. 6 goes into 13 twice. Odds are 2-1.

ltmurnau wrote:

Ratios in these older simpler games are almost always "x to 1" or x:1.
Divide the number of combat factors on both sides by the smaller number of combat factors.

So 9 to 7 becomes:

= (9 divided by 7) to (7 divided by 7)
= 1.28 to 1

and the ratio is always "rounded off" in favour of the defender, so you would roll on the 1:1 column.

13 to 7 would be 1 to 1, but 14 to 7 would be 2 to 1.

Brian
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lebowski
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Hi! What if the attacker has 10 and defender has 14? Would it be a 1:2?
Thanks!
 
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Clive Cleland
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yneos wrote:
Hi! What if the attacker has 10 and defender has 14? Would it be a 1:2?
Thanks!


Yes.
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