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BoardGameGeek» Forums » Everything Else » Religion, Sex, and Politics

Subject: Deathbed soundtrack rss

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So, if you are cognizant on your death bed, what would you have playing?

I would probably go with a rotation of Eno's Ambient 1: Music For Airports, Mitch Hedberg's Mitch All Together, and Will Ackerman's Imaginary Roads.
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Rusty McFisticuffs
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Dimmu Borgir's Perfection or Vanity. And it's not going to be a death bed.
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Andre
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"I did it My Way" , by Frank Sinatra.
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J.D. Hall
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Koldfoot wrote:
Hillary Clinton speeches, just so everyone else would know my misery.

laughlaughlaugh
Now's funny!

In all seriousness, I'd rather hear the rushing of a clear mountain stream, the wind through the high trees, and the clear song of the birds.

Or a hot 18-year-old chick loudly and enthusiastically mouthing my wang.
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C Bazler
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"Come, and trip it as you go..."
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"...on the light fantastic toe."
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Alex Ross, music critic for the New Yorker, wrote an article years back about the eerie phenomenon of several terminally ill patients, all unknown to each other, asking to listen to the music of Estonian composer Arvo Pärt in their final days. I've heard of many similar stories like this wrt this composer:





Alex Ross wrote:
A few years ago, a man who faced a terminal diagnosis of cancer asked a friend to give him some compact disks so that he could have a little music to help him get through the night. Among the recordings that the friend sent was “Tabula Rasa,” on the ECM label, which contained three works by the Estonian composer Arvo Pärt. A day or two later, the man called to thank his friend for the disks, and, especially, for the Pärt. In the last weeks of his life, he listened to practically nothing else.

Several people have told me essentially this same story about the still, sad music of Pärt—how it became, for them or for others, a vehicle of solace. One or two such anecdotes seem sentimental; a series of them begins to suggest a slightly uncanny phenomenon. Patrick Giles, in an article for Salon, reported that when he worked as a volunteer for an AIDS organization, in the nineteen-eighties, he played “Tabula Rasa” for those facing the final onslaught of the disease, and they developed a peculiar, almost desperate attachment to it. Once, when Giles was away, the mother of one of the dying men called with an anxious query. “He keeps asking for 'angel music,' ” she said. “What the hell is that?” The music in question was the second movement of “Tabula Rasa,” in which a rustling arpeggio on a prepared piano leads into glacial chords of D minor.

According to the unsentimental evidence of record sales, Pärt's music reaches far beyond the conspiracy of connoisseurs who support most new classical music. He is a composer who speaks in hauntingly clear, familiar tones, yet he does not duplicate the music of the past. He has put his finger on something that is almost impossible to put into words—something to do with the power of music to obliterate the rigidities of space and time. One after the other, his chords silence the noise of the self, binding the mind to an eternal present.
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Adam Phelps
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Roads go ever, ever on...
To the lands beyond the sea.
On a white ship will I sail,
Watching shadows part for me.

Leaving Havens grey with rain,
Now that years have slipped away.
Leaving friends with gentle pain,
As they start another day.

Roads I've traveled I must leave,
For I've turned the final bend.
Weep not empty tears, but grieve,
As the road comes to an end.

It's so easy not to try;
Let the world go drifting by.
If you never say hello,
You won't have to say goodbye.

If you never say hello,
You won't have to say goodbye!



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cbazler wrote:
Alex Ross, music critic for the New Yorker, wrote an article years back about the eerie phenomenon of several terminally ill patients, all unknown to each other, asking to listen to the music of Estonian composer Arvo Pärt in their final days. I've heard of many similar stories like this wrt this composer:





Alex Ross wrote:
A few years ago, a man who faced a terminal diagnosis of cancer asked a friend to give him some compact disks so that he could have a little music to help him get through the night. Among the recordings that the friend sent was “Tabula Rasa,” on the ECM label, which contained three works by the Estonian composer Arvo Pärt. A day or two later, the man called to thank his friend for the disks, and, especially, for the Pärt. In the last weeks of his life, he listened to practically nothing else.

Several people have told me essentially this same story about the still, sad music of Pärt—how it became, for them or for others, a vehicle of solace. One or two such anecdotes seem sentimental; a series of them begins to suggest a slightly uncanny phenomenon. Patrick Giles, in an article for Salon, reported that when he worked as a volunteer for an AIDS organization, in the nineteen-eighties, he played “Tabula Rasa” for those facing the final onslaught of the disease, and they developed a peculiar, almost desperate attachment to it. Once, when Giles was away, the mother of one of the dying men called with an anxious query. “He keeps asking for 'angel music,' ” she said. “What the hell is that?” The music in question was the second movement of “Tabula Rasa,” in which a rustling arpeggio on a prepared piano leads into glacial chords of D minor.

According to the unsentimental evidence of record sales, Pärt's music reaches far beyond the conspiracy of connoisseurs who support most new classical music. He is a composer who speaks in hauntingly clear, familiar tones, yet he does not duplicate the music of the past. He has put his finger on something that is almost impossible to put into words—something to do with the power of music to obliterate the rigidities of space and time. One after the other, his chords silence the noise of the self, binding the mind to an eternal present.


Thanks for that reference.
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A9uyMjzmT3k

Because it's my favorite song and will make everyone (or maybe nobody will be there) cry.

and then

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R_V9f64KRYk

Cause fuck you that's why.

As for a "death album" that captures the "loss" vibe pretty well I'd have to say

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6zurnifn-Y0
 
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Moshe Callen
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ἄνδρα μοι ἔννεπε, μοῦσα, πολύτροπον, ὃς μάλα πολλὰ/ πλάγχθη, ἐπεὶ Τροίης ἱερὸν πτολίεθρον ἔπερσεν./...
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μῆνιν ἄειδε θεὰ Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος/ οὐλομένην, ἣ μυρί᾽ Ἀχαιοῖς ἄλγε᾽ ἔθηκε,/...
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Honestly if I'm lucid as I die, I'd like just to talk to my loved ones. I like background music but y wife finds it distracting. If I die alone, just a mix of my favorites-- everything from Credence Clearwater to Metallica and Megadeth to 4 Finger Death Punch and Disturbed.
 
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