$30.00
Recommend
 
 Thumb up
 Hide
6 Posts

Tesla vs. Edison: War of Currents» Forums » Strategy

Subject: AC/DC - Music to Our Ears? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Don Clarke
United Kingdom
Nantwich
Cheshire
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
I quite like TvE. There are a lot of choices to be made. I put up a good fight in my one game played so far by building only two projects (the others in the game built 4 or 5), focussing instead on cash and then share trading. But I forgot you are actually playing a company, and you start with 4 shares in that company that you cannot trade away. My trading weakened my own company too much, and the eventual winner won largely by investing in her own company. But I think a variation of my erstwhile ill-fated 'few projects' strategy might still be viable? Thoughts anyone?

I'm not sure about the idea that you cannot trade away your initial shareholding. It means you have to focus largely on the health of your own company, and the other players know it. People seemed to finish with about 10 shares, so those initial 4 are a significant proportion of your final score. That does seem a little limiting and maybe guides strategy a little too much in an obvious direction? Thoughts?

But after only one play I might be wrong, and I certainly would like to try the game again.

The other thing that I found a little cumbersome was calculating the cost of buying a project (which isn't why I didn't buy many projects, honest!). Players have to remember that some costs change as the three eras progress, and you have to add a basic cost, a distance cost, a possible cost to use other people's patents, and subtract a possible bonus, all in your head, and all that for multiple possible build sites!

I'll search for a decent 'quick play' aid in the files section...
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Victor L
United States
Massachusetts
flag msg tools
mbmb
If anything, I think the problem is that there's not enough reason in the game to focus on your own company. Because the value of your stock portfolio is all that matters in the end, it's more important to hold stock in the more valuable company than it is to make your company more valuable. Thus, managing your portfolio, not building your company, becomes the focus of the game. Which I think is unfortunate.

Note that I'm not claiming that this makes the game unbalanced--everyone can play the stock market. However, it makes what at first blush seems like the core of the game--developing your company by advancing technologies and claiming projects--subordinate to buying and selling stock. Doing the latter effectively (timing it well, and getting the right luminaries to help you do it efficiently) will win you the game, regardless of how well your company does. That may reflect real life, but it doesn't accentuate what is unique about this game. As someone else commented, it sounds like a game about building your company, with a stock market element, but is really a stock market game with an element of building your company.

The expansion rules are supposed to address this issue.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Don Clarke
United Kingdom
Nantwich
Cheshire
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks for your comments Victor, that's a really interesting finding! Again, I've only played twice now, but it seems to me that having preferred stock that you cannot sell essentially forces you to boost the share price of your own company if you want to win. Because those shares are going to be a significant percentage of your final shareholding.

It's interesting that more experienced players are not finding this. How do your games normally progress? Does everyone neglect project construction?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Benji
Switzerland
Gurmels
FR
flag msg tools
visit us on www.muwins.ch
badge
mbmbmbmbmb
intheory wrote:


The expansion rules are supposed to address this issue.


Having backed TvE on KS, I had played two multiplayer and a few solo games of TvE before i (like many experienced gamers here) decided the stock market was just too ridiculous to keep the game interesting and I had no intention of playing the game again.
Somehow, i convinced myself to back the Expansion anyway and just got it a few days ago. After the first games, i am happy to say that they really succeeded in saving the game! They kept what was already good and changed enough things to fix what did not work. Thumbs up thumbsup
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Don Clarke
United Kingdom
Nantwich
Cheshire
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Hi Benji, are you referring to the Powering Up! expansion?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Benji
Switzerland
Gurmels
FR
flag msg tools
visit us on www.muwins.ch
badge
mbmbmbmbmb
yangtze2000 wrote:
Hi Benji, are you referring to the Powering Up! expansion?


Yes. Love it.

You can find several threads about how the base game usually went and its glaring stock market problem (which rendered everything else irrelevant). It was not even about speculation, but pure mechanical "buy lowest, sell highest" until someone won.

With "Powering up", the stock market is still important, but you also really need to develop your own company to make enough money to spend there. The new events are fun, so are the workshops that give each developper its added specialty and direction (e.g. Tesla will now most probably go for AC - as it should be - to fulfill one of his bonus conditions). In addition, you get a bunch of AIs to play solo or incorporate into a multiplayer game, and they work really well and are very easy to implement.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.