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Subject: How to understand the bookkeeping mechanic thematically? rss

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David Grietens
Belgium
Leuven
Vlaams Brabant
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I just wonder, how does the bookkeeping mechanic in Mombasa can be explained thematically?

It seems a but upside down to first write something in the books, and then seeing if there are goods that fit what is in the books ... or do i see this wrong?

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Tolis Koutsikos

Athens
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It's your ledger. Puzzly and fiddly both in game and in real life, eloquently "tweaking" it to save taxes . Or maybe contracts you have accepted and must fulfill.
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Fraser
Australia
Melbourne
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Back in the days when there were less maps we played every map back to back
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There are things that man was not meant to know. I file this under that category. Although that said it is a lot easier to explain thematically than Splendor meeple
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Rob Stevenson
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Watford
Herts
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There are three things that happen relating to books and book-keeping that need a thematic explanation. These are:

1) Using book points to acquire books
2) Using book points to acquire pounds
3) Paying to flip a book over.

I think of them like this.

Acquiring books is like speculating on commodities markets and futures - it can be potentially risky because you may have trouble fulfilling the contracts, but the rewards can be significant.

Exchanging book points for money is like completing straightforward contracts - maybe you are even acting as an intermediary and just taking a flat £1 charge for facilitating other peoples business.

Finally, paying £2 to flip a book is either a bribe so that your cooking of the books goes unnoticed or a penalty clause for failing to complete the futures contracts you got tangled up in.

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Tolis Koutsikos

Athens
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The box cover shows the character writing down goods and dates with his quill in a book, an ink pot next to him, so it's definitely a sales/records/orders thing.If you do your books right, you get a bonus (tax returns/benefits), if you bypass them, you pay gold (fines, accounting fees etc). The bookkeeper card could be an auditor, or your accountant. And that's about all the thought this subject will get from me
 
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M H

Palm Harbor
Florida
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Keeping accurate books was an important necessity in colonial business. People are investing and speculating on the charter's growth and require an accurate record of the success/failures. The game seeks to reward the player for such diligence.

Collecting the tiles themselves is like notating the information in the book ledger. Are your books accurate? Because that's what moving the ink well along the track represents. Note how the movement of the ink well is tied to the cards you are playing. In other words are your book truely reflecting the business you are conducting? Your ledger says you do two bananas...did you? If not, then you will need to "cook the books" to hide the inconsistency from the investors.

Maybe a tad esoteric but it's how I reason the process.
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