$30.00
Recommend
1 
 Thumb up
 Hide
10 Posts

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Board Game Design » Board Game Art and Graphic Design

Subject: Craziest illustration software ever rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
guy
Wallis and Futuna
Grand Bois Du Nord
msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I use unusual software to make my stylized graphics:







Can you guess the software used?
Spoiler (click to reveal)
I made these graphics in Microsoft Word.

3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sebastián Koziner
Argentina
Capital Federal
Buenos Aires
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
badge
OK Art Studio - www.okartstudio.com
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I understand how, but... Why?
Great job anyway!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jake Staines
United Kingdom
Grantham
Lincolnshire
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmb
professorguy wrote:

Can you guess the software used?
Spoiler (click to reveal)
I made these graphics in Microsoft Word.



It's impressive that you have the patience to bother, but since you're capable, you'd probably benefit from learning something like Inkscape/Illustrator!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Colm McCarthy
United States
Madison
Wisconsin
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I admire your patience, but...Illustrator, man.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
guy
Wallis and Futuna
Grand Bois Du Nord
msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
colmmccarthy wrote:
but...Illustrator, man.

If I could purchase Illustrator, install it on a machine, and use it from then on with no further payments, I would do so in a minute.

Since using Illustrator involves paying rent in perpetuity--and losing access to my own work if I don't--I'm not interested.


I have used Inkscape, but the svg files produced aren't readable by most software since they blew the formatting. Also, Inkscape is much more finicky and painful by far than the software I use.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ciao from Saltybot
msg tools

Try this if you want a crazy software!
http://al.chemy.org/videos/

It's a free drawing soft focused on sketching, with a ton of modifiers like mirroring your brushstrokes. I like it for the abstract stuff I can do easily as base for my speedpaints.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jake Staines
United Kingdom
Grantham
Lincolnshire
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmb
professorguy wrote:

If I could purchase Illustrator, install it on a machine, and use it from then on with no further payments, I would do so in a minute.

Since using Illustrator involves paying rent in perpetuity--and losing access to my own work if I don't--I'm not interested.


There are still places selling the Creative Suite, not to mention second-hand copies floating around. It's perfectly possible to just buy a copy of Illustrator, installing it on a machine, and use it from then on with no further payments.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Santiago
Spain
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
You can actually purchase yet -calling by phone neeed, I beleive- the CS suite version 6, which is amazing, and way more than enough. Just dig a bit in Adobe site. IMO, never ever buy it if is not from Adobe, lots of sites selling a non legal version for a lot of cash. (There's no such a real legal thing as transferring licenses (according to Adobe's eulas) as many ebay sellers pretend). There's no real show stopping issue in using the wonderful CS6, or even CS5, or CS2, for even very high end professional work. CC is just better, but I can tell you work has been developed with MANY other things than CC. For example, the great Corel Draw package (700 dollars or so, if I remember well, and they have the elegance of giving you the chance of purchasing or renting, not FORCING you to either of the models.)

That said... I tend to highly recommend Xaras's product, the flexibility and ease/speed of use is beyond amazing, exports includes advanced pdf export, cmyk support, etc. They care about the professionals, I can tell you. Specially the Designer Pro solution, between 200 and 300 bucks, can't remember. The ease of use and learning of its intuitive drawing tools is also a huge plus. Indeed, the "Layout DTP" version has the basic main drawing tools and still cmyk and pdf print level export. (for dunno if for just 70 or 80 dollars ! At tiimes they make offers for even less.)

Even more, I tend to recommend lately also Affinity's new tools, even cheaper, now becoming available for Windows. Affinity Designer is out there already, and I consider it a fully professional tool. The equivalent to Photoshop, will be out for windows in just a little bit of time.

Afinity's or Xara are, imo, more powerful solutions, and easier to learn than Word, by far, for making vectorial illustration. IMO, better also than Inkscape, but you can't beat Inkscape pricing ! (I LOVE the tool and use it in my workflows for certain uses, and used that -years ago- in the past as my main vector tool. Xara Designer is just easier to use and a tad more complete for anything requiring serious/advanced print workflows. (and yes, I know you can manage as well with Inkscape for almost anything. I still recommend Xara and Affinity over it if one has the cash.... Indeed, my advice is to ADD it, to us all of them. Learning a number of tools gives you both flexibility and extra capability plus a collection of tools to adapt better to different projects. ))

So, while a lot of people tend to just say Adobe CC is the way to go, imo for indy projects, and even any sort of project where you do not heavily depend on interacting with native files from other CC users, you have an extremely interesting collection of options, mor ethan capable, for a fraction of the cost.Maybe I'd put them in this order of preference: Xara Designer Pro or Layout DTP tool, Corel Draw full package, Affinity Designer (and soon the photo retouching tool, too, heck they both are dirty cheap, the cheapest of the block, despite the amazing quality...). And the order is so due to I have yet tested very little Affinity's tools, but that might change, as being so cheap, and so powerful, it might become soon my number one recommendation. (I'm downloading every beta...)

Inkscape is AMAZING. But the CMYK matter keeps not having too much attention, neither other print related features never being added. They care mostly about the open source format SVG, but it does itself not support CMYK color profile, dunno if it ever will. And the whole thing about cmyk and pantones has many propietary stuff that is not the type of thing they like to mess with. Or better said, that it probably conflicts with open source licensing...

But...that said, and with the risk of opening a little can of worms...I'll go ahead and say it.. Having used extensively Inkscape and the majority of these tools, I'd say most of these are easier to learn, and in certain areas more productive than Inkscape. (but IMO, inskcape is way easier to learn than Adobe Illustrator. The latter is just the best tool around for vectors, IMO. Just not necessarily the best "choice" for every one and every situation. But as a complete package, market dominance, ensured lifespan+durability of your learned skills as useful (as the package would rarely see its ending), top of the food chain... no doubts....)

For those fans of 2D software and innovation (like me !), the most exciting thing, IMO, right now is on Affinity's newest tools...
Anyway, all I say here is for vector work. For digital painting (ie, oil & canvas like painting) : Krita, Corel Painter, Art rage, Sketchbook and in the iPad Pro, Procreate, are in many cases way better choices than Adobe's....

PD: having said all that, anything that gets the job done, is the right tool.. Even if using Word... I'm just 99% sure you'd suffer less (and could aim to a wider variety of project types) with some of the above recommendations, but it's an opinion...


 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jake Staines
United Kingdom
Grantham
Lincolnshire
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmb
OneManCrafts wrote:

(There's no such a real legal thing as transferring licenses (according to Adobe's eulas) as many ebay sellers pretend).


FWIW, while I don't know what the situation is in North America, the EU Court of Justice told Adobe to stuff it some years ago:

http://www.computerweekly.com/opinion/EU-court-legalises-sec...

(Well, actually they told Oracle to stuff it, but Adobe and other vendors are in the same situation.)

I've not heard of that decision being reversed. To the best of my knowledge, it's perfectly legal to buy a second-hand software license in the EU. It's the seller's responsibility to ensure that they remove the software from their systems, and obviously once they sell it to you they have no legal title to use that software any more.


OneManCrafts wrote:

Inkscape is AMAZING.


It's true, every time I use InkScape I'm amazed at how obtuse one piece of software can manage to be. ;-)

I'd recommend it to the hard-up because it's a perfectly capable piece of software at the ideal price for the home hobbyist, but as the owner of an Illustrator license, I never use it by preference. I definitely found Illustrator easier to learn, although I imagine different people will have more or less trouble with different software.

I'd second the recommendation to look at CorelDRAW, though. The last time I used it was many years ago, but it was a pretty good bit of software then. If you have no pretensions to do professional work they have a "Home and Student" edition with a no-commercial-use license which is pretty affordable, as well.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Santiago
Spain
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
To be honest, had no idea about that Eu court decision. (a pity it being only an EU thing, companies etc in the US or other countries would have issues, probably) Mostly I was remembering what I read in the actual Adobe's eulas, but interesting thing to know.

Problem with Inkscape is the whole color managing (meaning, color profiles, both RGB and CMYK, not the color selector) thing, at certain levels. Issues for cmyk color selection, true display/check of the tones and specially, export. No support of color profiles (cmyk profiles (FOGRA38, SWOP, etc)) . Whenever you need to do anything slightly advanced in printing, you'd find that as a huge issue. And Scribus ain't great in that department, either, although is in a better situation, thus people exporting from Inkscape. That workflow showed several limitations in my experience, though. Seems a lot of people here work with online, digital printers, those work a lot in RGB or just accept RGB files and do their best to get a fine output. Very rarely ye good old offset printing where the color control (cmyk, using the company's profile and other specs) is amazing. Price is the issue, obviously.

Some tools in inkscape are sort of less intuitive than in Illustrator. Other are the opposite. IMO, none of these applications are as intuitive and natural as what you find in Xara Designer. Less effort needed. And am loving Affinity Designer. In terms of ease of learn/use, I did not say a word about it, but Corel Draw is EXTREMELY easy. And powerful, accepted in many print companies as a reliable package for decades. (it seems so does Xara, specially in the UK).



 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.