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Subject: Which games have rss

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Steve Pole

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brought you most historical insight? I mean given an understanding of a tactical or strategic situation that you hadn't fully appreciated previously. The first time it happened for me was many years ago playing "S+T's" "Phalanx" and watching Roman Legions out-manoeuvre and then destroy massed ranks of spearmen struggling to change their "facing".
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Robert Wesley
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A-L-L of these, since it also included reading upon those in order with garnering greater comprehensions about them then, or learning from any participants within such for their contributions.
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Tim Parker
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Three greatest chess players ever: Bobby Fischer, Mikhail Tal, and Victor Korchnoi.
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Russian Front
This was the first game that really hammered home to me the logistics of the Eastern Front. Having to use German troops to convert those railroad hexes was a big pain and really hampered my advance.
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Eddy Sterckx
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Third Reich - "soft underbelly of Europe" my behind.
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Was George Orwell an Optimist?
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Which thread titles have
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Johnny Wilson
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Tigers in the Mist -- the horrors of road congestion

Afrika Korps -- the power of logistics/supply

Empire of the Sun -- the importance of "staging"

Roads to (series) -- the friction of losing combat cohesion

I know it's a cop-out, but each of them highlighted something of importance in military considerations (and applicable across many venues) in a way I'll never forget.
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Steven Goodknecht
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Wellington's Victory: Battle of Waterloo Game – June 18th, 1815/Ney vs. Wellington both utilize the same system. The games force you to use proper period combined arms tactics because every formation has an inherent weakness, hence, combined arms are essential for victory.

But trying to achieve that goal is where the challenge lies. So, like many of your historical counterparts you may charge with cavalry. But without infantry to follow up, any gains the cavalry make are quickly lost. Properly placed artillery can wreak havoc on infantry columns and cavalry. But placed without close support, artillery can be gobbled up by flanking cavalry and infantry skirmishers. Infantry in line formation can deliver lethal volleys but if trying to move, they can become disordered and vulnerable.

This is the only system where I have come away with a lesson in period tactics and how frustrating and difficult they can be to accomplish.
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Johnny Wilson
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Sphere wrote:
Which thread titles have


...given you the least navigational insight? For me it was "Funny Military Picture." I thought it was about bad movies and didn't realize it was a contest. :whistle:
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Ryan R
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Sphere wrote:
Which thread titles have


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Mike Hoyt

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I'm with Grogs. Almost every game I've ever played spurred additional reading, so there is definitely that.

In many cases I had done some reading, but playing the game really highlighted certain aspects. A couple of highlights (not surprisingly these are "10" games for me)

EastFront - geography! You know how most military histories are sorely lacking in adequate maps? You really feel that once you get a proper wargame map set up and have to count hexes or maneuver troops. True for almost every wargame

Flat Top - fuel and plane handling! There are more detailed treatments, which I don't care for, and other carrier games that omit this aspect entirely (I understand the need to streamline a game and searching/attacking is sexier, but I like handling the planes and sweating the fuel state). This game gives this important aspect it's due, without overwhelming the game.

Band of Brothers: Screaming Eagles - you mean there is more to combat than making "pew pew" noises? I understood some aspects of tactical doctrine prior to playing, but this game really exposes the "why". It's a good idea to start with some covering fire and suppress the enemy before assaulting, but why? Well, this game gives you the opportunity to try assaulting without getting their heads down first, and you will not forget the experience...likewise every other stupid mistake I'm so glad I made with cardboard instead of real troops. Bonus lesson, I never paid much attention to the differences between tanks until this game, now I get it!
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Tony Doran
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Barbarossa: Army Group South, 1941, Barbarossa: Army Group Center, 1941, and Barbarossa: Army Group North, 1941. These East Front Series games taught me how difficult it actually is to perform combined arms warfare.
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Wendell
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Case Blue is reminding me how important supplies are!
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Ron A
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Band of Brothers As has already been stated, importance of suppression before advancing to close combat.

Wing Leader: Victories 1940-1942 Shows fragility of units in aerial combat. Flights (vs full squadrons), aircraft with no radio, combat losses, ammo depletion-- all these will cause you to lose cohesion in a hurry. Choose your shot, choose it well, because chances are you won't get too many of them.
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Luka Kovač Plavi
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Is there a special reason for the clickbait of a title?

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Ek T
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This Accursed Civil War (and probably the whole Musket and Pike series).

Really gives the feel for how important but difficult it is to keep formations in order and how much chaos there must have been on the battlefield.

However, this insight comes at a high cost in terms of rules overhead.
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Judd Vance
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I'm with Mike: Band of Brothers taught me more about WWII tactical doctrine than any other game. The reason the narrative can be a bit dry is because every battle isn't a Sgt. Rock comic book.

Empire of the Sun taught me more about that theater than everything I ever knew before that.

Peloponnesian War likewise taught me more than I ever knew about that topic, but since I knew nothing about it, that's not saying much. But what was impressive was that as Athens in the Archidamian War, I ended up trying Pericles strategy. I had never heard of the guy or his strategy until I later read the historical commentary and realized the design of the game encouraged the strategy, rather than a bunch of fiddly rules requiring it.

While playtesting Hands in the Sea, I learned a lot about the topic, especially the random events. This led me to read Goldworthy's book on the topic and when I learned of Hannibal the Rhodian, I started bugging Dan to work in a strategy card that would allow you to run the blockade and the seamanship card was the result.

Unhappy King Charles! taught me why it was so difficult to gather an army and keep them in the field for any extended period of time.



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Zigi Hogan
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This is the main reason I play wargames.

For me, playing wargames is a much more effective way to learn about any conflict than reading a book. I knew nothing about ancient warfare until getting The Battle of Raphia (which is a STELLAR light game!) and kicked me in high gear on purchasing ancients wargames. It also made me look deeper into getting books on the subject; not only for strategic knowledge but because I found something interesting in the game and want to explore it further.

This has been the case with many conflicts I own games of, e.g. The Crusades, English Civil War, Alexander The Great, War of Roses, etc.
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Charles Vasey
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airjudden wrote:


Unhappy King Charles! taught me why it was so difficult to gather an army and keep them in the field for any extended period of time.





Wait until you see The Good Old Cause; lots of good academic research since UKC. To answer the OP's question, any game I've designed or tested, because you start reading one book, then another and soon you are over the dozen and finding more. As one reads one's views are constantly adjusted and honed. It's a great hobby.
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Robert Rossney
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Wilderness War made me look at the geography of eastern North America from the perspective of someone trying to wage war in it. I already knew that upstate New York was not a very fun place to be during the winter, for instance, but it took a game to drive home to me why stockades are such a big part of the story. Also, in a landscape with no roads, rivers define where you're going to go, which again explains why when you look at a map of New York, Pennsylvania, and Ohio there are all these towns in the middle of nowhere with "Fort" in the name.
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Jonathan Townsend
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This is a nice list!

I have just started getting into TCS (Tactical Combat Series), and although I have played and enjoyed the Napoleonic Battle Series (by the same designer) because of the order writing that is at the essence of it, I have not until now understood (as compared to 'knowing' - 'oh, I know that, I read it and it makes sense') the problems, restrictions, and choas involved in maneuvering large bodies of men and materiel around woods and hills in order to knock the living daylights out of each other.

It has been a real joy to behold the gaping holes and chance lunges one makes in daring grabs and the opposite sense of wanting to crawl everybody along in a big hedgehog just in case the enemy strikes from we don't know where.
The actual drawing of operational plans on sketch maps of the battlefield ensures you must take great care to include or not include certain roads, ridges, valleys, enemy positions, likely enemy positions, etc. Your men are not going to steer out of their operational plan to pick of that probing recon patrol over there, why would they? what else could be in those woods? 'Maybe its one of ours', 'don't worry, the staff have got that one tabbed' (yeah. right!)
This ensures that I resist the gods-eye-view of the player even more than with the written orders since lines of departure, phase lines, axes of advance, objective areas, and failure instruction rally points are all jotted down simply and cleanly with a pen or pencil on the map. Without reams of words the combat plan is tight and my gods-eye-view hand is stayed from moving a few Panzers over there becuae I can see his cardboard warriors coming.

It may sound restrictive but it actually feels liberating as I feel like more I am instructing the plan rather than gaming the system.

Just for the record, I have played the third scenario of Leros as a starter and am now embroiled in the whole days campaign out of GD '40.

For me I am thinking more of an insight into the general tactical sense of, in this case WW2 warfare, than anyone particular situation. But specific to those two games the system has shown me the efficacy of small numbers of but well trained troops vrs a larger more regidly responsive and initiative body. In Leros the Brits have to operate from Op Sheets (the graphic and written orders) whilst the Fallschirmjagers are free to do whatever they like and wherever they like whenever they like on the first day or night they parachute in.
In GD '40 we have a swirling of forces as each tries to capture and hold a central point surrounded by expanses of woods and field. Both gain reinforcements in alternating stages and so each seeks to outdo the other whilst strongest before the other gets stronger, and consequently dodge, or find a good place to resist, the other whilst weak.
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Charles Vasey wrote:
airjudden wrote:


Unhappy King Charles! taught me why it was so difficult to gather an army and keep them in the field for any extended period of time.





Wait until you see The Good Old Cause; lots of good academic research since UKC. To answer the OP's question, any game I've designed or tested, because you start reading one book, then another and soon you are over the dozen and finding more. As one reads one's views are constantly adjusted and honed. It's a great hobby.


Wait until you see The Good Old Cause

When will we have a chance of doing so?
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Charles Vasey
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hammurabi70 wrote:
Charles Vasey wrote:
airjudden wrote:


Unhappy King Charles! taught me why it was so difficult to gather an army and keep them in the field for any extended period of time.





Wait until you see The Good Old Cause; lots of good academic research since UKC. To answer the OP's question, any game I've designed or tested, because you start reading one book, then another and soon you are over the dozen and finding more. As one reads one's views are constantly adjusted and honed. It's a great hobby.


Wait until you see The Good Old Cause

When will we have a chance of doing so?


I'm still redesigning and reinstalling rule modules, so maybe I'll finish next year. I hope so.

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Robert Wesley
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Avtomatik wrote:
Is there a special reason for the clickbait of a title?

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GROGnads the "nails-it technician":~"You're 'soaking-up/in' THIS!"
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At a tactical level, The Guns of Gettysburg. It's all about the maneuverin'...
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ROGER DEAL
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Starship Troopers Just kidding. Really it was Ogre.
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