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Arkham Horror: The Card Game» Forums » General

Subject: Face Planting - Arkham Horror vs. Lord of the Rings rss

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Alan Castree
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Let me start off my saying I haven't played Arkham Horror LCG yet but hopefully the cores that took my money shall arrive sooner rather than later.

I love Lord of the Rings and am still quite new to it, but one thing I enjoy doing is taking on a new quest without reading through any of the encounter cards or quest cards beforehand. This often leads to me losing the first game or two because my deck isn't prepared for the type of threats. I learn that as I go and adjust accordingly (I was pretty surprised by quest 3b of "A Journey to Rhosgobel". Frickin' bird died because I wasn't prepared).

When it comes to Arkham Horror (or even LotR if you care to share your methods) how do you feel about "face planting" the different scenarios, especially with the consequences of the campaign mode and how your mistakes (when deckbuilding or otherwise) will carry over to the next scenario. How do you plan on going about the game? Do you also learn as you go or do you read everything beforehand?

One last thought, will face planting have as harsh concequwnces in Arkham, since (so I hear) compared to LotR, there's not as much deckbuilding involved, at least when it comes to between different sessions, anyway.

Honestly, I'll most likely just grab a deck and go. Will learn what horrors await as they make themselves apparant.



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Gustavo Herodier
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ACGalaga wrote:
one thing I enjoy doing is taking on a new quest without reading through any of the encounter cards or quest cards beforehand.


I always play my first time through a scenario blind too

Who cares when I turn out to be woefully unprepared!




Like you pointed out, I think the campaign aspect of Arkham means you're not gonna be modifying your deck much between scenarios, so the game must account for that... It'd be really harsh to find out 6-7 scenarios in that your deck is simply incapable of dealing with the challenge
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Jonatan Rueløkke
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Blind the first time. (Already played coreset with 2 people on TTS. Played Standard campaign three times and lost all three so far)

And to compare to LotR.

In LotR the reason for winning would probably lie in 30% how you play and 70% the deck you build.

In AHLCG the ratio seems more to be the other way around. Therefore knowing locations and what they do or might do, what might show up from the encounter deck in a scenario, and what happens because of the different agenda and act thresholds, will more likely affect how you play the scenario than the way you build your deck for that scenario.
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Simon C
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I have a bit of a dilemma here.

On the one hand, I want to play blind.

On the other, I also want to play with my girlfriend, who is (a) not a particularly experienced gamer and (b) would generally prefer that I'm confident in the rules and not going to be checking the rule book continuously as we play. Which both point towards playing the core-set campaign (or at a minimum the opening scenario) solo before playing it with her.

Obviously, the blind play could be a solo one, then I play with her, but that's not ideal; it'd be nicer to play it together blind.

I suspect for the opening scenario at least I'll accept the spoilers and play a game blind solo, then introduce her to it. If she likes it and we continue to the rest of the campaign and expansions, hopefully we can feel confident in hitting new things blind together.
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Andrew Burns
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I'd like to play this blind with my girlfriend too - I'd been relying on the first scenario seeming quite simple. At least, it seems that way at the beginning in the Team Covenant video. (So I guess the first 2 locations are spoiled for me. But it did sound like an 'intro')
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Gergo Tothmihaly
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ACGalaga wrote:
One last thought, will face planting have as harsh concequwnces in Arkham, since (so I hear) compared to LotR, there's not as much deckbuilding involved, at least when it comes to between different sessions, anyway.
As winning or loosing is not so black or white in Arkham as in LotR it probably won't be that harsh. Some (most? all?) scenarios won't have a winning or loosing condition, you play them and finish with some result (and that result might have some consequences later). So, even if your first performance will be crap you won't necessarily feel you lost.
All the above is simply based on the info I read/watched. I'm eagerly waiting to pick it up myself.
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Thanee
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ACGalaga wrote:
How do you plan on going about the game? Do you also learn as you go or do you read everything beforehand?


Definitely going in without reading anything beforehand. Surprises are fun!

Not sure, yet, how I will go about it with the campaign... maybe I will play it once for the fun of it, and a second time with a bit of a clue about what to do then for campaign progression.

Bye
Thanee
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It's a game based in the Cthulhu mythos so I'm fully expecting things to go sideways rather quickly. In my opinion, good Cthulhu-themed games should always make you feel like you're a step behind and your victories should always come at a cost. I don't mind the "face plant" at all and plan on playing the game with random characters and no prior knowledge of what's about to happen. The fun is in the journey. If I'm able to defeat an unspeakable horror? Even better.
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David Williams
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I'm afraid I'm too old to understand the use of the phrase "face planting" in this context.
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Mark Chamberlain
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Face planting is a borrowed term from netrunner, in my lexicon. It means heading in unprepared face-first, and maybe planting said face right in to something nasty. Or maybe not!

It is, taking a potentially deadly risk
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Gustavo Herodier
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Its skater slang for landing on your face.
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Donny Behne
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My biggest complaint with LOTR was that it was the highly "competitive" deck construction that felt ripped out of Netrunner or Magic but slapped onto a highly thematic, cooperative experience with a story. I wanted to play the story - not play the deck. But success in LOTR required you to play the deck (by that I mean very detailed construction with consistency more important than flavor). So my interest in LOTR dropped significantly.

I enjoy MTG a lot, but it's a very different system than LOTR and I like them for different reasons. Knowing this, I am entering AHLCG the same way I expected to play LOTR: flavor first. I'll build a deck and play the scenarios based on how that investigator would approach them. I love that they put so much focus on the RPG elements (watch the presentation from Arkham Nights to see how important this was to the design). It gives a lot of hope that there's so much more to this experience than constructing a blindingly good deck. I want to play the story and I think that's what this game gives us.

Long story short - all the face plants.
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Emily Dickinson
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I'm realizing that for myself, the different worlds of Tolkien and Lovecraft are already making a difference in how I see the two games. In LotR, it feels "wrong" to lose, almost a betrayal of the underlying themes. In this, I'm very much looking forward to having a campaign that includes dead/insane Investigators noted on the log, and getting some Total Failure results.
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mathew rynich
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You can play blind with the starter decks and do fine. The starter decks are not optimal, but they don't need to be to be successful due to some very smart design decisions in this game.

First there is a resolution for any particular outcome in each scenario so you can't lose the campaign really. You just plot a coarse through the campaign. This allows you to experience the game without running into that feel like you just keep banging your head against a wall. Warhammer Quest The Card Game had a similar approach, but I feel like they really refined that idea here with how the campaign guide works. Some of the branches you could take were pretty surprising IMO.

Secondly every card has a secondary value in the skill icons so your hand will never be entirely useless.

Thirdly you can always use actions to take resources and draw cards to improve your board state so you have much more agency as a pilot than you did in LOTR. How you build the deck is important, but how you pilot the deck is more important in my opinion.

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Richard A. Edwards
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Drakthalos wrote:
In LotR the reason for winning would probably lie in 30% how you play and 70% the deck you build.

In AHLCG the ratio seems more to be the other way around.

THIS is spot on!
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Joshua Siegfried
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I plan for my first play through of each new encounter to be totally blind. Even after that first play through, I don't plan to sit down and look through the encounter deck to memorize all the cards. I imagine a few of them might not show up during the first (or even second?) play through and would still surprise me during subsequent plays.
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mathew rynich
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The third scenario is the one that changes the most, and several elements are random things that are shuffled in so the core campaign has a pretty large ability to surprise you at the climax if you don't study the encounter and location cards. That said those random elements to me didn't feel like just a grab bag of stuff. It stitched together to form a good story at the end. I really dug the core campaign and am excited to see what they do from here.
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Rob Rob
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SirRoke wrote:
Drakthalos wrote:
In LotR the reason for winning would probably lie in 30% how you play and 70% the deck you build.

In AHLCG the ratio seems more to be the other way around.

THIS is spot on!

I really hope so.

Quote:
A Journey to Rhosgobel". Frickin' bird died because I wasn't prepared).

This was my experience as well. It's such a contradictory situation; you want to enjoy the discovery so you play through the quest without spoilers - only find out half way through the game you've carefully crafted a deck which renders the quest literally impossible to win.

So you get crushed and play it again - with a new deck + having all the story spoiled.
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Kelly B
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SirRoke wrote:
Drakthalos wrote:
In LotR the reason for winning would probably lie in 30% how you play and 70% the deck you build.

In AHLCG the ratio seems more to be the other way around.

THIS is spot on!


I will second this. I've two cores and have dabbled in what it's like to optimize one's deck and it doesn't really change the landscape that much. In fact I like the starting decks better, possibly because I love finding ways to use what appear to be useless cards and sometimes taking that epic risk and succeeding is what makes the game fun.

I can't believe I still feel as excited about the core set as I did on the first day. I look for any reason to sit down to a game of AH The Card Game. Tweaking the difficulty by changing the chaos bag or flipping to the more challenging scenario card...damn it's good.
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Keith Little
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I will be playing blind every time.
 
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Alan Castree
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I love playing blind! The only issue I'm going to have is whether to hold off on playing blind until I can play with a group or play blind solo. Which one will happen fist and which one will take priority, especially since I'll have a few campaigns going at the same time.

Robrob wrote:
Quote:
A Journey to Rhosgobel". Frickin' bird died because I wasn't prepared).

This was my experience as well. It's such a contradictory situation; you want to enjoy the discovery so you play through the quest without spoilers - only find out half way through the game you've carefully crafted a deck which renders the quest literally impossible to win.

So you get crushed and play it again - with a new deck + having all the story spoiled.


So, I see it like this: It's similar to a platform videogame. You play and see how far you get, then you die. You play again, you're more familiar with the threats you'll confront, you get a little farther... then die again. Each play you get a little better until finally you get to the end boss... then die again and throw the controller through the TV screen.
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