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Subject: Targi - A Detailed Review rss

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Image Courtesy of W Eric Martin

This review continues my series of detailed reviews that attempt to be part review, part resource for anyone not totally familiar with the game. For this reason I expect readers to skip to the sections that are of most interest.

If you liked the review please thumb the top of the article so others have a better chance of seeing it and I know you stopped by. Thanks for reading.

Summary

Game Type - Card Game
Play Time: 50-70 minutes
Number of Players: 2
Mechanics - Modular Board, Worker Placement, Set Collection
Difficulty - Pick-up & Play (Can be learned in 20 minutes)
Components - Very Good to Excellent
Release - 2012
Artist - Franz Vohwinkel

Designer - Andreas Steiger (Debut Title)

Overview and Theme

Targi takes us to the ethnic peoples of Northern Africa that call the Sahara Desert home. Your people live in nomadic tribes and it is the men (Targis) that cover their faces whilst the women (Targia) do not. As leader of one of these nomadic tribes you must trade the goods of the land in order to acquire gold and better your position. Your aim is simple enough, to support the largest tribe.

Targi is the debut title of Andreas Steiger and I won't hold any punches up front here when I say that he has produced an excellent 2-player game and one that is totally deserving of finding a place in the revered Kosmos 2-Player series of games.

Hop on that camel and come with me...I have a most enjoyable journey to take you on.

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The Components

Kosmos always put together a good production and this is no exception. Not surprisingly, cards dominate the components.

d10-1 Border Cards - Instead of utilising a board, Targi provides 16 cards that act as Border Lands or regions to frame the central play area. Rather than simply creating a border, these cards are actually part of the play area as well. As such they are double-sided with text on one face to outline the ability and iconography on the other (which does the same thing in a more simplified way).

Like all of the cards in the game, the thickness is serviceable but they only have a glossy finish. All cards in the game use a landscape orientation.

These border cards also feature a little bit of artwork to differentiate each quarter of the border with a different terrain. It is totally unneccessary but a nice touch all the same.


Image Courtesy of Alice87


d10-2 Tribe Cards - The game comes with 45 of these cards of which their are 9 of each type. These cards represent ways in which a tribe can gain assets and wealth and include things such as camel riders, oases, wells, camps and Targia's (women - and for the record this is not as assets like in a harem because Targia's lead these tribes).

The cards are elegantly organised with a graphic to denote the type on the left, the cost of each card in the top right and the VPs it is worth in the bottom right. If a card has a text-based ability it is located centrally.

It's all very crisp.


Image Courtesy of henk.rolleman


d10-3 Goods Cards - These are much simpler affairs as they simply feature central graphics to show what goods are earned by taking a given card. Three cards also feature a gold coin and another a VP icon.

Like the Tribe Cards, these utilise a sand dune background that evokes the theme and offers a neutral colour palette to help the foreground colours stand out. I also appreciate the shadow effect of the artwork, as if a burning sun is beating down on the cards.

It's nice stuff.


Image Courtesy of Alice87


d10-4 Meeple - These are nice wooden affairs that come in two players and a grey meeple serves as the Robber.

Squat cylinders serve as the Tribe Markers.


Image Courtesy of jemione


d10-5 Tokens - The Goods tokens are simple square counters and feature the same graphics that are used on the Goods Cards. The VP tokens are quite an irregular shape to help them stand out and no doubt they are based on some form of trinket used by North African tribes.


Image Courtesy of henk.rolleman


d10-6 First Player Amulet - A medium sized token is used to represent this marker to denote who goes first in a turn. It's quite noce to look at.


Image Courtesy of Alice87


d10-7 Rules - The rules are very well done. I found no ambiguity whatsoever in my edition (Z-Man) and they feature good examples to boot.


Image Courtesy of Alice87


Overall the game offers great value for money and looks great into the bargain. The artwork is simple but Vohwinkel (as he always does) manages to evoke the setting and theme of the game in a way that is refreshing.

Only the absence of a matte/linen finish on the cards stops this one from earning an Excellent rating from me. Kosmos don't tend to offer this feature in their designs, which is a shame.


Image Courtesy of jcd2001es


Set-Up

The game takes a little set-up but after a few plays it can be completed in a matter of 1-2 minutes.

First the border of the play area must be constructed using a total of 16 cards. These are numbered and so they are placed in numerical order to form a rectangle with space in the middle. The border cards are double-sided, one side offers a text-based description of the card's ability and the other simply offers icons. After a few plays you will be so familiar with each ability that the icon side is the only one needed and it helps to reduce the visual clutter.

Next the central area is created. This is done by placing 9 cards (4 Tribe and 5 Goods) into the open space to form something of a grid. These are placed in such a way that no two cards of the same type are adjacent. A very simple diagram in the rule book makes it as easy as pie.

The players take their Meeple (Targi figures) and 2 Tribe Markers each. The Robber Meeple is placed above border card #1 (Noble Space) and each player takes 2 of each goods tile (salt, pepper and dates), 1 Gold Coin and 4 points worth of VP tokens.

The game is ready to begin once a start player is chosen and given the First Player Token.

The Play

Image Courtesy of Camdin


The play for Targi takes place over two distinct phases. The first phase allows for worker placement and the other allwos resources to be gained, spent and abilities used.

d10-1 Move the Robber – At the start of a new turn, the Robber Meeple must be advanced one space around the border region. This of course does not take place on the first turn, instead he is placed on the #1 or Noble Card space.

Should the Robber move to one of the 4 corner cards, or Raid locations, the players have been attacked by hostile forces. They must either give up VPs or Goods as listed on the card. The choice is theirs.

Once the Raid is paid for the Robber moves to the next available Border location and play continues.

d10-2 Placing Targis – This represents the worker placement portion of the game. In turn, beginning with the player holding the first player amulet, the players alternate in placing one of their Targi figures onto one of the border card locations.

There are however some placement rules that must be adhered to -

mb A Targi cannot be placed onto the same location as the Robber (although they can be placed on the border card opposite the Robber).

mb A Targi cannot be placed onto a corner (Raid) Card.

mb A Targi cannot be placed onto a card already containing another Targi of either player.

mb A Targi cannot be placed onto a card that is directly opposite a Targi owned by your opponent.

Abiding by these rules the players take turns in placing all 3 of their Targi's.

d10-3 The Benefits of Targi Placement – The importance of placing Targi's is two-fold.

The first benefit is that each of the available 11 border cards (one will contain the Robber and 4 are Raid Cards) offer an ability that can be utilised. Sometimes they offer goods but other times they offer other powers such as gaining a Good/Tribe Card or allowing a player to trade goods for VPs or gold.

The second benefit though is far more intricate. What the players are aiming to do by placing their Targi's is to form invisible intersections between their meeple. Through careful placement of their Targi's a player can form a maximum of 2 intersecting locations (think of it as grid co-ordinates like in Battleship) and this allows the players to place their Tribe Markers at these locations.

This in turn gains a player access to more cards in the central area. These cards represent Goods or Tribe Cards.

d10-4 Perform Actions -

Image Courtesy of rvlieshout
This is the second major phase of play and allows each player to utilise the abilities of Border Locations they have Targi's on and to take Goods and Tribe Cards from the central area (where they have a Tribe Marker).

An important aspect of this phase is that a player can elect to resolve their available actions in the order of their choosing. This is most important as it allows for clever combos to sometimes be created, especially when certain actions of border cards allow trading or the movement of Tribe Markers.

The player holding the first player token resolves their actions first, followed by the second player.

mb Collecting Goods - Most often a player will elect to collect any goods available to them first as these can then be used to pay for Tribe Cards or be traded in some way using border location powers.

mb Pay for Tribe Cards - One of the key ways to earn VPs in the game is to collect Tribe Cards, which thematically represents the advancement of your tribe I guess.

Tribe Cards always have a cost in goods and often gold. If a player wishes to gain a Tribe Card acquired from the central area, they must pay the cost in the current turn.

Buying a Tribe Card allows a player to add it to their personal Tableau, which I will outline shortly. The cost in goods and/or gold is paid to the bank.

If a player cannot or does not want to pay for a Tribe Card, it can be discarded or added to a player's hand (a max of one Tribe Card can be held at a time).

NB - When a card is taken from the central area, it is always replaced by a card of the other type. In this way the central area maintains a balance of sorts between Goods and Tribe cards. Newly added cards are always placed face-down so the players cannot gain an advantage over their opponent in relation to forward planning.

mb Utilising Border Abilities - The many abilities offered by the Border Region Cards often break the rules in some way or assist the players by offering greater flexibility. I think it is important to outline these powers in full but I won't do so here as it will break up the flow of this game play outline. You will find all powers listed at the bottom of this section.

d10-5 The Player Display – When a player pays for a Tribe Card they must add it to their Display, which at its biggest will be a 3 x 4 array (3 rows vertical by 4 columns horizontal).

The first card added to a player's Display is always placed in the top right corner to start their first row. Subsequent cards that are paid for however offer the players a choice. They can choose to add it to the next available space in a row or they can start a new row (until all 3 rows have been started at least). Gaps can never be left in a player's Display.

The players are trying to complete each of their 3 rows by filling it with 4 cards. A row will score bonus points at the end of the game if it contains 4 cards of identical type or 4 cards of different type. In this way Targi adds the element of set collection to its play.

It should also be noted that Tribe Cards also offer a number of victory points (1-3) and many have a power that can be used during the game to gain small advantages (pay less when buying certain Tribe Cards, bonus VPs at the end of the game for certain conditions etc).

d10-6 Ending a Turn -

Image Courtesy of bkunes
Once the second player has carried out all actions, the round is at at end. The First Player Amulet changes hands, the Robber moves one more space around the border (possibly triggering a Raid) and any face-down cards are turned face-up for the players to assess.

The players must also look at their resources. A player cannot have more than 10 goods or 3 Gold Coins (good luck with that one) in their supply at the end of a turn. Any excess must be returned to the bank.

d10-7 Triggering the Endgame – Targi can end in one of two ways. Play will cease at the end of a turn in which at least one player has purchased their 12th and final Tribe Card (thus completing their Display) or after the Robber has been moved to the 16th and final Border Card and the players have paid the cost of the Raid Card.

When either of these occur the game is over and it is time for final scoring.

d10-8 Scoring – Targi allows its players to score in numerous ways. A player's total score is calculated by adding up the following :-

mb Tribe Cards - All the VP icons on each Tribe Card in your Display.

mb Victory Point Tokens - Total value of all VP Tokens in your personal supply.

mb Special Tribe Cards - Calculate the bonuses offered by any Tribe Cards in your Display (e.g. Gain 1 VP for every 2 Camel Rider Cards in your Display).

mb Display Scoring - A player earns 4 points for completing a row in their Display with 4 Tribe Cards of the same type. This is not all that easy given that only 9 of each card are in the Tribe Deck and not all cards will be seen in a game.

A player earns 2 points for completing a row if all 4 cards in a row are of different types (there are 5 types of Tribe Card in all).

The player with the most VPs takes the win. In the event of a tie the player with the most gold reigns supreme and if that is tied the player with the most remaining goods gets the victory. If the tie cannot be broken then play again (a cheeky but most excellent suggestion). devil

The Border Card Powers

In a game such as this I think it is important to know the abilities of the border cards as it helps to enlighten a player as to the kinds of ways the game can be manipulated. Here we go :-

mb #1 Noble - Allows a player to buy a Tribe Card held in hand (see #14) or to discard a Tribe Card in hand.

mb #2 Goods - Gain a date

mb #3 Goods - Gain a salt

mb #4 Raid - A player can give up 1 good of their choice or pay 1 VP token back to the bank (hence why player's start with 4 VPs)

mb #5 Trader - The Trader allows a player to pay 3 goods of the same type to gain a Gold Coin or two goods of the same type to gain a good of their choice.

mb #6 Goods - Gain a pepper

mb #7 Goods - Gain a date

mb #8 Raid - A player can give up 2 goods of their choice or pay 1 VP token back to the bank.


Image Courtesy of henk.rolleman


mb #9 Fata Morgana - Perhaps the most powerful border location, this card allows a player to move one of their Tribe Markers to any other card that does not contain a Tribe Marker. Often in the game, the players will aim to deny their opponent a certain card in the central marketplace and then the Fata Morgana can be used to access it! sauron

mb #10 Silversmith - A player can pay 2 goods of the same type to gain a VP token from the bank or 4 goods of the same type to gain 3 VPs.

Or they can pay 1 Gold for 2 VPs or 2 Gold for 4 VPs.

They can only pick one of these options in a single turn.

mb #11 Goods - Gain a pepper

mb #12 Raid - A player can give up 3 goods of their choice or pay 2 VP tokens back to the bank.

mb #13 Caravan - Allows a player to draw the top card of the Goods Deck and receive whatever is on it. With 3 cards in the deck offering a Gold Coin...this can be a lucrative ability at times.

mb #14 Tribal Expansion - This ability allows a player to draw the top card of the Tribe Deck. They can choose to pay for it immediately to add it to their Display, add it to their hand (if they do not already hold a card) or they can discard it if it doesn't suit their purposes.

mb #15 Goods - Gain a pepper

mb #16 Raid - A player can give up 1 gold coin or pay 3 VP tokens back to the bank.

So What's to Like? - The Strategy

Targi has many things going for it. I'll try to summarise these as follows -

d10-1 The Border Cards -

Image Courtesy of STOCKBROT
The game could have been pretty good if it simply used the central card mechanism and a worker placement aspect, but the inclusion of the Border Cards and their powers adds so much to the game.

It allows the Robber to cut off access to certain powers and the players have to plan for these moments as the game plays out. Of course the Robber also acts as a possible game end trigger and timer, which keeps the game from overstaying its welcome.

The border region also guarantees that all goods are available, even when some may not appear in the central area. The players need to weigh up their need for certain goods versus the need to access some of those crucial abilities. Those abilities can combine to allow for some neat combos as well.

But above all it allows for the worker placement aspect of the game to be taken to a new level...

d10-2 Creating Intersections - This is such a clever aspect of the game, the ability to create intersecting locations between your Targi's in order to gain access to central cards. It gives the worker placement aspect of the game an added importance and there is much strategy in deciding when to pursue your own needs versus when it is critical to deny your opponent a key location.

d10-3 The Display and the Tribe Cards - The scoring of the cards in a player's Display is excellent as it again gives heightened purpose to which cards a player is seeking to acquire and when. Set Collection is such a simple mechanism and it has been around for a long time, but when implemented in this way it still feels fresh.

The game also creates a nice balance with the Tribe Cards by having some worth more VPs and others worth less but with an in-game power that can maximise future actions or an end of game scoring bonus for meeting certain objectives.

There is no doubt that the players are always eyeing off Tribe Cards as they enter play but once you are out of goods you really only have one option. meeple

d10-4 Always in the Hunt - The best games in my opinion are the ones where all players feel like they are in with a shot at the win. Targi does this expertly and on occasion my partner or I have even felt like we were out of it, only to find we eeked out the win by a point or two. meeple

I love a game where there are multiple means of scoring and Targi has this. Sure it is no fruit salad scoring like a Castles of Burgundy, but for a game of this weight it is one of the better ones I've experienced.

d10-5 A Key Restriction - A good resource management game also needs to make sure that the players cannot access everything in abundance. Targi is unique here in that it is really quite easy to gain access to goods at most times.

Thankfully it does restrict one resource quite tightly and that is Gold Coins! These are critical in buying the more valuable Tribe Cards and gold is only accessible by trading 3 goods of one type (Border location) or gaining access to a Gold Card in the Goods Deck (of which there are only 3 in a deck of 19 cards)! surprise

d10-6 Variability - Targi offers pretty good variability between plays because of how those Goods and Tribe Cards come out and what Tribe Card special powers enter play. The balance between Goods and Tribe cards will also ebb and flow during play based on how the players attack the game and each game will not reveal all Tribe Cards (usually about half), so the players are kept in the dark as to what will be available. This requires the players to be flexible and adjust their plans accordingly as the game unfolds.

d10-7 It's Really Fun and AP Light - But above all else (and because of the above reasons), Targi is just a really entertaining and interesting game to play. Not many of the games in this series go a full hour but the time just flies by in this one and you feel like you've had to think your way through the experience.

And although decision making requires the consideration of numerous factors, Analysis Paralysis never seems to feature at all here and the game flows really well. Downtime is non-existent as the worker placement aspect is consecutive and the gathering of goods, using abilities and paying for cards is a quick affair.

Are There Any Negatives?

Image Courtesy of W Eric Martin


I really don't think there is much to dislike about the game unless 2-player games are not your thing or you are heavily against Euro-styled mechanics.

But there are two points that may not be to some player's liking :-

d10-1 Length of Play - Some people may look at a box of this size and a game of this weight and expect/want a game that plays in a 25-40 minute period. So for a game that averages about 60 minutes it may just be too long for some people.

However, like I have said, the decision making on offer here and the fun factor, are in my opinion worth every minute of that time frame.

d10-2 Fata Morgana Location - I can see some people having an issue with the power of the border location that allows you to move a Tribal Marker to an unclaimed central location of your choice.

This is because it can tend to dominate the play of the game somewhat. Often a Gold Coin or a particularly juicy Tribe Card will appear in the central area and both player's eyes will light up. The first player for the turn only needs to place a Targi on the Fata Morgana location and then block up other rows to ensure that card cannot be intersected and they have secured the card for themselves.

This has been pretty frequent practice for my partner and I and can lead to some repetition in game play when a coin or critical Tribe Card appears.

This can also lend the game an increased luck element too as the players are not in control of what cards appear each turn. There can be an element of 'right place at the right time' by being the first player on a turn when a critical card appears.

I don't think the Fata Morgana location is a game breaker in any way and other border locations can be powerful at times too. The First Player Amulet does alternate between the players but I have observed this aspect of game play and it could irk some players I believe.

The Final Word

For me the conclusion is simple. Targi is a cracking (I use this term with the same verve as the HeroQuest unboxing guy ) game and I am enjoying the exploration of its depths and the interplay that it allows with my opponent immensely.

There have been some great light 2-player games released in recent years including Revolver, Patchwork, Star Realms and Jaipur and I regard this to be in the same company.

I'm pretty slow in getting to some of the games that people rave about on BGG these days due to a large collection and a busy lifestyle but I am very glad to have ripped the shrink off this one. My partner loves it too and this will be in regular rotation for many years to come.

If you haven't tried it yet I can only recommend that you do. The only question for me is whether I grab myself a copy of the cooler looking German edition due to that awesome front cover artwork, which is so much cooler than any other edition. The game is now language dependent as far as I'm concerned. I suspect it will happen at some point. cool

Till next we meet, may your Targi's work in unison and that next Oasis be only around the corner.

Compared to other Games in the Kosmos 2-Player Series

Targi is for me one of the best in the 2-Player Kosmos Series for sure. It is alongside the likes of Jambo, Odin's Ravens and Babel for sure and time will tell if it takes the top spot (this is a project I look forward to getting to - ranking all the games in the series).

It is one of the longer games to play for sure as we average around the hour mark to play this one but the decisions are always engrossing.

The scoreline is always tight in this one too we have found and that always makes for an enjoyable time. There is now an expansion in German and I really hope that can be translated in time (only Targi and Jambo have had expansions released in the series).

With a rating higher than Jambo and just over 13,000 logged plays (at time of writing) Targi has firmly cemented itself as a great 2-player game.


Image Courtesy of Gialmere


Review Links

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Kosmos Links

Following is a list of games in the Kosmos 2-Player Series (plus Pick & Pack) that I have or intend to review. Hopefully these are of value to you if you are researching for a good 2-Player game but are unsure of which one to get. At present I have all of the games on the list below.

Babel

Balloon Cup

Blue Moon

Caesar & Cleopatra

Crocodile Pool Party!

Dracula

Dragonheart

Elkfest

Finale

Gone Fishing!

Heave Ho!

Hellas

Hera & Zeus

Jager & Spaher

Kahuna

Lost Cities

Pick & Pack

Odin's Ravens

Perry Rhodan

Rosenkonig

Starship Catan

Summertime

The Pyramid of the Jaguar

The Reef

Tally Ho!

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Simon "that sci-fi guy"
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Great review. I'm glad to see you think as highly of it as I do. I also note that you place it in good company: Star Realms!

You're working through the Kosmos 2 player series: good idea. I should look into that...
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Andy Steiger
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WOW what an outstanding and amazing review! Thanks for all the effort, work and time You put into it. I am very happy that You like Targi
Thanks again I will gladly check out Your other reviews as well.

Gretings from Germany
Andy
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Rob Crosby
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Excellent review Neil. I really like the way you do your reviews thumbsup

Now I have yet another game to think about (sigh) laughmeeple
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Tilou
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XB_XB wrote:
Excellent review Neil. I really like the way you do your reviews thumbsup

Now I have yet another game to think about (sigh) laughmeeple


There is nothing to think about! It's one of the best 2-player games out there!
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Zaphod Beeblebrox
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Excellent review for an excellent game. I've found the game's rules are straightforward enough that relative neophytes can pick it up, but at the same time there's enough depth and interesting decisions for gamers to really enjoy it as well. Andy Steiger struck that balance well.

Bonus: the Japanese version of Targi has one of the more unique board game boxes (which is also my favorite box!):

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David Janik-Jones
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Excellent review.
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BorderCon
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Thanks folks for the positive feedback.

I've been at this review writing caper for a while now and I'm always questioning if it is time to evolve to a new style or not. In this day of time poor folks and the rise of the video review I question if people still want a detailed written analysis like these.

I think I am still committed to this format for the foreseeable future (like another decade at least), with minor tweaks here and there.

Yes I do like that Japanese cover too but it isn't easy to appreciate until it is blown up larger. The original is just so eye catching and bold - I love it.
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Neil Thomson wrote:


I've been at this review writing caper for a while now and I'm always questioning if it is time to evolve to a new style or not. In this day of time poor folks and the rise of the video review I question if people still want a detailed written analysis like these.



I like both (video and written). Thank you for taking the time to do these.
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James C
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Agree, good game that my wife and I have played a bunch since we got it in May.
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Greg Darcy
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Neil Thomson wrote:

I've been at this review writing caper for a while now and I'm always questioning if it is time to evolve to a new style or not. In this day of time poor folks and the rise of the video review I question if people still want a detailed written analysis like these.


For a variety of reasons, I will always take a written review over a video one.

Thank you for an excellent review. Now to go check my budget. Sigh. Or maybe update my Secret Santa wishlist.

EDIT: I'd give you some but I see you are a Melbourne Victory fan. Can't be seen supporting one of THOSE!
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David G. Cox Esq.
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I like both the game and the review.

I thought light grey was a strange colour for the robber meeple. It was easily confused with the white pieces.

I repainted my robber a dark brown.

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BorderCon
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da pyrate wrote:
I like both the game and the review.

I thought light grey was a strange colour for the robber meeple. It was easily confused with the white pieces.

I repainted my robber a dark brown.



You painted it...you crazy son of a gun!
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David G. Cox Esq.
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Basically I'm just a simple thrill-seeker who loves living life in the fast lane.
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