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Steve S
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I'll explain my confusion through the use of an Athenian Event Card.

The event card says 'Muster a trireme in Adriatic Sea, then battle a space adjacent to Adriatic Sea.'

Given that, I flat out don't understand the entire Muster in Place process.

'At times you may wish to muster a Hoplite or Trireme without actually placing a new piece. Typically this is done to establish the condition needed to play a Status or Prepare Card.' I thought I understood this when I read it-it is saying one doesn't need to actually put a new piece (condition 1 of a card) to trigger a second beneficial action (condition 2 of a card). In other words, a two benefit card (new piece + whatever condition 2 is) can be used to only get condition 2.
But
'You may designate an existing piece (Hoplite or Trireme, as appropriate), to be the newly mustered piece, without actually removing the piece first.'
I thought I understood this: if you have a hoplite/ trireme anywhere on the map, you can treat it as the 'Mustered' piece, AND LEAVE IT WHERE IT IS (this would be the point of the phrase IN PLACE), and thus get the condition 2 triggered on the card. But maybe not. Maybe saying '...without actually removing the piece first' means one has to MOVE the existing piece from its current location to the location prescribed on the card (you don't remove it then place it on the prescribed location, you simply slide it from one location to the other, or something). But this isn't consistent with the concept of 'Muster in Place.' '...In place' implies no movement.

Finally:
'When mustering in place, your piece need only trace a supply line to a friendly city, and a Hoplite does not need to be adjacent to another of your own pieces.'

Are you tracing a supply line to the pieces existing location, because it doesn't actually move, or are you tracing a supply line to its new (prescribed by the card) location, after it moved?

If you DO MOVE an existing piece, already on the map, to the prescribed location, then the only difference with 'mustering in place' vs normal mustering are the build rules: normal mustering requires supply as well as adjacency to an existing piece, but 'mustering in place' only requires supply (but no adjacency to an existing piece. Thus 'mustering in place' has no effect on mustering of triremes, which don't require adjacency to an existing piece under normal muster rules).

I strongly suspect 'mustering in place' means you move an existing piece on the map to the new, card prescribed location, and that move is different from normal mustering only because Hoplites don't need to be adjacent to a one of your own pieces.

But the language of the rule (muster IN PLACE) is so counterintuitive to what actually happens (MOVE one of your pieces from one PLACE on the map to another place) that I'm not confident I am right.

Because the alternative is also problematic. On the card I originally mentioned: (Muster trireme in Adriatic Sea, then battle sea adjacent to Adriatic Sea), Mustering in Place by not moving a trireme (Say leaving it on the other side of the map-IN PLACE) then battling adjacent to the Adriatic Sea, makes no sense.

Steve

 
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Alec Usticke
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When you muster in place, you do not move the piece. It remains in the same space. Basically you can play a Muster Hoplite or Muster Trireme card (or another card with the equivalent effect) to muster an existing piece (without moving it).

Why would you waste a card to basically keep a piece in place, i.e., to change nothing? Well, you wouldn’t unless mustering the existing piece triggered some beneficial effect on another Prepare or Status card.

As for the event card that says, “Muster a trireme in Adriatic Sea, then battle a space adjacent to Adriatic Sea”: If you already have a trireme in the Adriatic Sea, it remains in place and you may then battle an adjacent space.
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Ian Brody
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Alec that's correct, thanks!
 
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Martin Gallo
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If this explanation does not work, I think there are at least two other forums about Mustering.
 
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Steve S
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It works, but that really is problematic for the Adriatic Sea card, isn't it?

Muster a trireme in the Adriatic Sea, then battle a sea zone adjacent to the Adriatic Sea.

"Muster in Place", which is designed to allow an existing piece on the map to fulfill the requirements for mustering a piece, would allow you to just count a fleet, say , near Crete (on the opposite side of the map), as the 'muster' requirement for the first part of the card. That fleet (on the other side of the map) then battles a sea space adjacent to the Adriatic Sea and kills something (without leaving Crete).

Steve
 
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Steve S
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"Why would you waste a card to basically keep a piece in place, i.e., to change nothing? Well, you wouldn’t unless mustering the existing piece triggered some beneficial effect on another Prepare or Status card."

I don't know why you would do it, but the entire rules section "Muster in Place is written to allow it to happen, so I assume it must have some beneficial effect.

Steve
 
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Alec Usticke
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SDawg wrote:
It works, but that really is problematic for the Adriatic Sea card, isn't it?

No, not at all.

Quote:
Muster a trireme in the Adriatic Sea, then battle a sea zone adjacent to the Adriatic Sea.

"Muster in Place", which is designed to allow an existing piece on the map to fulfill the requirements for mustering a piece, would allow you to just count a fleet, say , near Crete (on the opposite side of the map), as the 'muster' requirement for the first part of the card. That fleet (on the other side of the map) then battles a sea space adjacent to the Adriatic Sea and kills something (without leaving Crete).

No, the card specifically says to muster a trireme in the Adriatic Sea, not anywhere else.
 
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Alec Usticke
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SDawg wrote:
"Why would you waste a card to basically keep a piece in place, i.e., to change nothing? Well, you wouldn’t unless mustering the existing piece triggered some beneficial effect on another Prepare or Status card."

I don't know why you would do it, but the entire rules section "Muster in Place is written to allow it to happen, so I assume it must have some beneficial effect.

Sorry, Steve, but you must be misunderstanding. I answered my own question.
 
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Benji
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SDawg wrote:


I don't know why you would do it, but the entire rules section "Muster in Place is written to allow it to happen, so I assume it must have some beneficial effect.

Steve


Of course it has. You can never have two of your pieces in a region.

Take the following card: "use after you muster a Trireme: Battle a land space adjacent to that Trireme."

Without the "muster in place" rule, you could only battle land spaces adjacent to a newly placed trireme. Since mustering in place is allowed, you may declare one of your existing Triremes as the mustered one (once you spent the card to muster it "again") to fulfill the first part, then battle a land area that is adhacent to that existing Trireme.

The card you mentioned is not the best example, because you could do one effect without the other (one is not a pre-requisite for the other).
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