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Subject: Why do some recent games go OOP so quickly? rss

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Donald M.
United States
Sweet Grass
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When I first starting board gaming, I read a lot of reviews. Then when I go looking for the games about 30 percent were out of print. Some came back after waiting years, others never come back in print. One has to spend a lot of money to buy these rare games.

Recent games also become unavailable quickly. So when I see a game I like and the quantity is low, I usually buy it for fear of never seeing it again for a long time.

Why is this? Is it because some companies are small and have small print runs?

For example: "Leaving Earth" a 2015 game I cannot find anywhere .Pillars of the Earth in English is impossible to find (cheap) as is the expansions. Etc. etc.
 
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Ian Williams
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I figure lots of games just have that first print run, and unless it sells really well there isn't much impetus to do another. Perhaps they figure most people who want it, bought it first time, and there aren't another few 1000 potential customers.
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Don Riddle
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Cult of the New.

Precisely because many things become quickly hard to find, many collectors buy things they never open. Or know little about. I've found the secondary market is strong with many bargains to be found for a dedicated hunter.

And the companies usually can't take too much of a chance on a game's success because they're expensive to produce. It's better to leave folks wanting than to have a warehouse full of unwanted games.

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Mark McGee
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It's largely because game companies need money to flow.

They make an initial print run that is as large as will sell out reasonably quickly. After that, when gauging demand, if it doesn't seem like there will be enough demand to sell mostly out of another print run, then it's not financially reasonable to print another run.

Printing a run of games turns your money into cardboard that takes up a lot of space. Space takes money. So if the cardboard doesn't turn back into money quickly (by being sold), then you're not only out the cost of storing all that cardboard, but the money that has turned into cardboard is also lost (effectively, since it's tied up for an undetermined amount of time).

So most of the time, there is one print run and that's all, unless the game is significantly popular.
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Don Thiess
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FYI, Leaving Earth is available direct from the publisher. I'm not sure it ever entered other distribution channels.

You can purchase it here.

Edit: As for Pillars of Earth, I think it's out of print because of rights not being licensed to the publisher any longer, but I'm not certain on that.
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J J
Australia
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What they said, but also this:

A modern board game will see a print run of 3000-5000 copies as standard. Some might do more, some might do less, but let's settle for a figure of 5000 copies.

That's the entire supply over the entire world.

It is not hard to see how such an item might vanish from all the suppliers you see or know. It might actually sell out quite quickly, or there might be 1500 sitting on shelves half-way across the world that you'll never know about. Which one is actually the case doesn't make much difference from where you sit.

As an example - I learnt about Fealty some time before it was released. Quite liked what I saw. I've been keeping an eye out ever since. So far as I know, despite its fairly standard production run (and lively second-hand life in the US and Europe), it never made it to Australia through distribution channels. Not even by the guy in Canberra who specialises in bringing in limited numbers of rare games from the US and Europe. There's a similar story to Ascending Empires (although it was available here, very briefly, through one importer/distributor/retailer).

The world is large, and this hobby is small
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Donald M.
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Sweet Grass
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In this case I should not hesitate buying anything new that I may like and not regret later. Problem is I don't have all the money in the world lol.

In an ideal world, everything should always be available to everyone. Yes, I know economic plays a huge factor. The things you learn.
 
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Don Thiess
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Also, try not to let the fear of missing out force you into buying something.

There usually isn't a good reason, in my opinion, to spend unreasonable amounts of money on "rare" games. They will either be reprinted eventually or a similar game will be made (or possibly already exists) or a reimplementation with a new theme will be made.

Plus, there are already so many games that are readily available and more being announced/released almost every day.

I definitely agree that it's a bit of a bummer to find out that something you are interested in is unavailable. But hopefully you can happily occupy yourself with games that are.
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Donald M.
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Sweet Grass
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Wisegy84 wrote:
Also, try not to let the fear of missing out force you into buying something.

There usually isn't a good reason, in my opinion, to spend unreasonable amounts of money on "rare" games. They will either be reprinted eventually or a similar game will be made (or possibly already exists) or a reimplementation with a new theme will be made.

Plus, there are already so many games that are readily available and more being announced/released almost every day.

I definitely agree that it's a bit of a bummer to find out that something you are interested in is unavailable. But hopefully you can happily occupy yourself with games that are.


Good kind advice. Much appreciated. I noticed if a game is really popular it will have multiple print runs (guess it depends on the company). There is an initial blitz and then the 2nd print has tons left over too.

I made the mistake of buying games just to full out a free shipping threshold or panic as a game was selling out fast all over many times. This happens on sales too. OTHO, I do posses games that are OOP so it works both ways.

 
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ace hawkster
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This comment from previous post sums it up I'm afraid
"The world is large, and this hobby is small "
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Paul DeStefano
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All games are OOP the moment that they stop the first print run.

Whether or not they get a second run is dependent upon the market, production costs and remaining stock.

No publisher WANTS a game that prints 5,000 and stops.
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Richard Keiser

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If you know its new, and you like it, buy it. Most likely, you won't be alone in that conclusion.

If its old, and no longer available, then you will learn a common theory of micro-econ.

 
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Mark Jackson
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You fell in a pit on the first turn. Good job!
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Buying games for fear of not being able to get them later is a great way to spend a crap load of money and end up with a crap load of games you never play. But I'm not a game collector, so if you are have a ball.
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