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Subject: Getting into painting, Blood Rage. rss

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Tom Piperni
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I know, people have asked before but I want to see some fresh opinions anyways.

I've never painted before, I'm not an artist by any means but I really want to paint my copy Blood Rage. I'm interested in giving it a shot, since it's just way too expensive to pay someone to do it.. Plus, it could be a fun hobby to get into.

I'm looking to get some sort of starter kit maybe, paints, brushes, stuff that'll be good to use for Blood Rage (maybe move to 'The Others; 7 Sins' one day). I'm willing to spend $100-200. From what I've researched, the cheap stuff is exactly that, cheap in both price and quality and thinning the paints could be an art of it's own.. I'm not really interested in that. Citadel appears to be top of the line but their prices are absurd. Looks like maybe Vallejo is something in the middle? Good quality and reasonably priced. Or is Citadel really worth the extra cost?

So, please let me know what you'd suggest I spend my money on (including primers). Post pictures of your painted Blood Rage and let me know what paints and colours you used as well as brushes and sizes.

Thanks!
 
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Jake Staines
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I haven't bought any Citadel paints in over a decade but unless they've got dramatically better the difference is in the quality of their marketing department, not the quality of their paint. Citadel washes might be worth it, but if the paints are notably more expensive where you are then don't feel like you should spend more compared to Vallejo, Reaper, P3 etc.

With Vallejo in particular bear in mind they do more than one line. Air Colour is for airbrushes, so don't buy that. Model colour is for kits, although it works fine for figures if you thin it a bit more. Game colour was originally intended to mirror Citadel's colour range, although I believe Citadel has moved on since then.

Equally important to good paints is good brushes - make sure that the bristles are flexible and come to a neat point when moistened. They often get shipped with a bito f wax on the bristles to form a point - don't buy the brush until you've broken the wax and moistened it and made sure it doesn't splay all over the place. Prefer shorter-bristled model brushes to long-bristled artist's brushes where it's hard to get the same control for tiny details.
 
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Edmund Proctor
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There a few articles linked from the BGG miniatures wiki which might be helpfull.
 
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Jordan Ackerman
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Painting is a great part of the hobby and $200 is more than enough to set you up for a few years of painting.

Buy two top-tier quality brushes (Windsor & Newton Series 7/Raphael Davinci/Rosemary & Co.), round size 0 and round size 1. If you order from an art supply company, these are watercolor brushes. There are two types of brush length at this size. I have only used the shorter size, which is good for fine detail, but be aware there are shorter and longer bristle lengths when shopping.

Then buy some cheap brushes for metallic paints and drybrushing, because those techniques ruin brushes. Get a range of sizes, including some flat brushes (rectangle shaped) of a couple sizes.

Brush holders can be rigged up with various tools, but Master's Brush Soap is a must and you must also clean your brushes before leaving your paint station.

Paints, choose either Reaper, Vallejo, or P3 to start. Army painter also makes great stuff and there are some other high quality obscure options if you start exploring paint brands. Citadel makes great paint, but their paint pots are awful and their prices are high. Citadel washes are hard to beat and worth the money.

Paint sets can be found for a good discount and a preselected pallette of colors. After using a hsndful of colors to start, I bought the Reaper HD Blitz set for $65 and supplemented it with greens and purples. Haven't run out of a color in 1 1/2 years.

Buy a black and/or white spray primer, matte or ultra-matte. Almost all cheap brands are widely considered good enough.

You will slso want s hobby knife (exacto blade) and possibly some Green Stuff or Milliput if you are going to fill in gaps on your minis.

A gallon of distilled water.

A plastic dry pallette or baking paper, paper towels and an old tupperware for a wet pallette.

Paper towels, as many as you can buy.

One can each of Testors Glosscote and Testors Dullcote to seal your minis.

Lastly, products like matte medium, flow aid, and drying retardant (Slo-dri from Liquitex) for the paints. Reaper have a flow aid added already and should only need water if you decide on that brand of paint; not sure what other brands are preblended this way. Matte medium (Lahmian Medium from Citadel) is used to make your own glazes, which are a technique you should start learning after you do your first mini.

I haven't painted Blood Rage, but I may come back here later and upload some photos of my Descent minis for you.
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Freelance Police
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Reaper Learn to Paint Kits: https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/1162642/reaper-bare-bones-l...
 
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Nathanael Robinson
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Suicide Kings wrote:
From what I've researched, the cheap stuff is exactly that, cheap in both price and quality and thinning the paints could be an art of it's own.. I'm not really interested in that.

I'm not sure about the craft paints that are available to you in Canada, but getting a good consistency out of Folkart is not that difficult. However, it does require a little experience so that you can sense what is right.

I think Vallejo is a decent way to go. You might want to add Citadel Nuln Oil, which is an adaptable brown, transparent wash. A few art paint products will also be helpful: soft body black, titanium white, and burnt umber to adjust colors and matte medium to increase the transparency of paints. Most primary will give the results you want, but avoid anything 2X (paint and primer) at all cost. A black primer will be more forgiving, but may require you to paint additional layers.
 
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Jordan Ackerman
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Craft quality paints do require several more layers to provide complete coverage, but they blend really well. You do need to add a mixture of water and flow aid to get them to behave properly, but learning the proper consistencies of a basecoat versus a glaze is a major part of the hobby.

Also, craft paints have less of a matte finish to them, but I actually prefer this for a few things, such as the basecoat of some cloaks and anything with a shine to it, such as insect chitin. I always have some Liquitex colors around to mix with my other brands and they are the paints I started with while learning.
 
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"What do you mean, I can't pay in Meeples?"
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rutherford82 wrote:

Buy two top-tier quality brushes (Windsor & Newton Series 7/Raphael Davinci/Rosemary & Co.), round size 0 and round size 1.


+1 to this.

Put your money into good brushes; cheap ones will give you no end of frustration. Do not try to paint minis with dollar store offerings unless you are going to do nothing but drybrush/wash techniques. You're looking for natural fibre watercolour brushes with a fine point - sable, particularly kolinsky sable, is regarded as the best brush money can buy. That said, it may not be the best for you personally as an entry level painter - Citadel makes some decent sable brushes (at least, they did in the past, I haven't bought one from the most recent line) for a fraction of a W&N's price. Your local art store almost certainly carries something similar. That's what I'd recommend as your first brush purchase. Even if you move onto a W&N later, it'll do good work putting down flats and bases for years to come.

Two common mistakes are buying too many brushes and brushes that are too small. One or two good brushes plus a couple of inexpensive 'throwaway' synthetics for drybrushing / washing is plenty to begin with. You don't need a meaty handful of specialized shapes to do great minis. The point of the brush matters more than the size of the brush. A good #1 will do finer detail and hold more paint, making for less trips over to the wet palette, than a 0000 that can't hold a point.

Oh yeah, Wet Palettes! Do yourself a favour and make a DIY one - just some parchment paper, paper towel/sponge and a cheap resealable container.



If you invest in good brushes, also invest in good brush maintenance. Do not allow paint to get into the ferrule (the metal bit that holds the bristles together). Do not pull hairs from your brushes or store them anything but hair side up. Clean well after use, don't let paint dry in them. Last but not least, grab yourself a pot of "The Masters Brush Cleaner and Preserver" - any good art store, including a place that carries Windsor & Newtwon, should have it. One small pot should do you for life. It's brush-safe soap that'll dramatically increase the lifespan of expensive brushes.



What brushes you select also depends what standard you want to paint to. Basic tabletop is very different from showpiece. If you're never going to paint something smaller than a fist or belt, professional level brushes are overkill and won't really improve your experience. Having bought a number of starter kits for painting, I can confidently say - Don't.

Kits are rarely a good deal - either you end up with low quality brushes, or paint colours you don't really want, or both. Pick one of your models, figure out what the basic colors you need are (this should always include black and white, plus one or two greys) and get 2-3 complimentary shades/tones of each. While you can and should learn how to mix colors, it's much easier to keep unit consistency if you have pots of the base colours available at all times. Get a good variety of browns. Brown is a pain in the butt to mix and it gets used for a ton of things - light sandy browns, ruddy reddish browns, deep dark browns, medium browns, grey brown, tan brown... it's one colour to not be stingy with when picking out paint pots.

Washes are wonderful. Get at least one each of blackish, brownish, and chestnut/flesh wash.

My current paint collection breaks down like this:

Monochromatic - Black, three shades of Grey, White
Washes - Black, Flesh, Chestnut, Brown, Red, Green
Metallics - Silver, Dark Silver, Copper, Light Gold, Dark Gold, Dark Metal
Flesh - dark and light.
Green - Five from pastel green to very dark green, plus olive.
Aqua - Three varieties of blue/green.
Blue - ice blue, robin egg blue, Royal blue, grey-blue, Dark blue, Navy blue
Red - Dark Red, bright red
Orange - just one
Yellow - bright yellow, dark yellow
Earthy - Terracotta, dark terracotta
Purple - lavender-pink, dark purple, medium plum
Brown - So many browns. Over a dozen very distinct colors from tan to sandy brown to khaki to muddy to chestnut.

And allows me to paint pretty much anything I want from trolls to eagles to dragons to puny human snacks.

As for actual paint brands, well friend, we don't get a ton of options up here. If you live near a hobby shop, you'll probably have Vallejo and Citadel to choose from. Both have their issues. Citadels aforementioned overpriced pots are horribly designed and require regular babysitting with water top-ups to not dry out. That said, the actual paint quality is good, or at least it was in the past. I don't know about the current range, but the older one was made by HMG Paints (now marketed as Coat D'arms), who still exist and sell their marvellous paint in the old-style squish-on tops that hold up extremely well to evaporation. Downside, you pretty much have to order them online from the UK. Coat D'arms is my go-to paint of choice.

Vallejo isn't bad - the colour range is very broad, many people swear by the dropper bottles since they're far more spill proof and don't dry out or get crusty nearly as fast. Downsides include you need to use a palette, some of the colours don't cover very well (they tend to be thinner) and, my personal gripe, they chip easily and separate in the bottle. Expect to do a lot of shaking. Varnishing afterwards is almost mandatory if using Vallejo model paint range. The Game Colour range are as durable as GW paint though tend towards being a bit shiny as a result. They're also harder to find, most stores that don't cater to miniatures/gaming specifically will carry the model line not the game colour line.

Then there's your craft paints. These can be hit and miss. I find acrylic airbrush colours like Createx, and acrylic air-dry / water based enamels to be hard wearing and good choices. DecoArt is my go-to for solid blacks and metallics. Last but not least, there's artist grade acrylics. Don't get the stuff in tubes, it's far too thick and takes some skill in thinning to work with properly. Also avoid 'student grade' materials - this paint has less pigment coverage and given how little paint you need to do a large number of minis, it's best to invest in good stuff. Tri-Art Artist Acrylic Colors in bottles are a good choice for picking up really nice shimmery metallics.

In short, don't limit yourself to one paint range. See what's available locally. Dollar store acrylics aren't terrible but like brushes, you'll get better results from better materials.


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Tom Piperni
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Lots of great info, thanks so much for taking the time, I really appreciate it. From everyone, thank you all. I'm going to re-read everyones posts a couple more times to retain the information better and then start doing some shopping. I'll check some local store prices and compare to online. I'm guessing online will be cheaper, as with most things.

If any of you have painting Blood Rage, share the pictures, I'd love to see them.. Or any game for that matter, show off some of your work!

Again, thanks a lot everyone.
 
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Niko J
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Here's my first paintjob for Cyclades monsters (poor photo):

http://i.imgur.com/86mdMqz.jpg

Variety of the sculpts was interesting. Lots of trial and error. Really enjoyable process. Probably my worst paintjob to date and they still look good on the table which I'd like to think is encouraging. Heck, that minotaur is barely highlighted and I've had people wow over it! I imagine Blood Rage's monsters will be a similar experience for you, if not better since the're much better figures.

Good luck with Blood Rage. Try not to get discouraged by all those clansmen. I know I have motivation issues when it comes to repetitive paintjobs. If you're going to paint them assembly line style I'd recommend you don't do too big batches to start with. It's better to do three at a time, then five or whatever, than it is to try to batch paint 10 figures and quit halfway through because you found it a soul grinding experience.
 
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Starla Lester
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They look great! thumbsupthumbsupthumbsup
 
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